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March 07, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-07

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THE MCMCiAN DAILY"

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 1959

TWU~ 1IWUW~A1V DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7,1956

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Our constant aim is your
eating pleasure and sat-
isfaction. You can't find
more perfectly cooked
c nd seasoned food any-
here .. . as good as at
the Golden Apples- Room.
Try it yourself!
*i Y ROPA'IYo 4 7ram

SEE PEUROPE
FOR LESS ON.
ALL-STUDENT TRIP
You can save up to $289 on your
trip to Europe . . . if you hurry!
See England, France, Italy, up to
16 other countries. Travel with
other U.S. college students. Have
more fun in a small group of con-
genial travelers of your own age
and interests. Only small deposit
needed up to April 15. But hurry,
only limited space still available.
Write today for FREE folder and
information on AYA's all-student
summer travel bargains.
3 TO 9-WEEK TRIPS--
$295-$1045
See your local agent or write:
AMERICAN YOUTH ABROAD
317-C 14th Ave. S.E.
Minneapolis 14, Minn.

How many times have students
waited anxiously for the familiar
ring of Bell's well known inven-
tion?
Exactly 80 years ago today, the
telephone, universally important
for business and social reasons,
came into existence. A joint pat-
ent was issued to Alexander Gra-
ham Bell and Governor Gardnier
Greene Hubbard, Boston attorney,
on March 7, 1876.
The well known first sentence,
"Mr. Watson, come here I want
you," was spoken by Bell two days
after the patent was received. Bell
had accidentally spilled some acid
and called his assistant Thomas
Watson to help him.
Bell and Hubbard developed an
interest in transmitting speech
electrically as a means of teaching
the deaf to speak. Bell was em-
ployed at the Clarke School for
the Deaf in Boston when he be-
came acquainted with Hubbard.
The two men became business as-
sociates and later Bell married
Hubbard's daughter.
Fame of the telephone spread
rapidly, interest soon developed
in the new invention. In 1878 Hub-
bard began canvassing Detroit for
subscribers. He succeeded in ob-
taining 73 customers and during
tfhe same year, the first telephone
directory was established.
Impatient\ people who dislike
waiting for calls should be calmed
by realizing that their call is only
one out of a total of 197,476 local
and long distance calls made daily

Bell Invention Has Birthday

--

in Ann Arbor. The Bell Telephone
Company in Michigan employs
27,400 people and has a yearly
payroll of $116 million.
These facts and figures provide
ample evidence of the multimil-
lion dollar business which began
only 80 years ago when two men
bega nexperimenting with a means
of transmitting speech electrically.
Vietnamese
Paper Begins
New Edition
The first English-language news-
paper of Viet Nam began publi-
cation this year.
"The Times of Viet Nam has
originated from the need to make
Viet Nam known to her friends
throughout the world," the edi-
tors explain in the first issue.
"The Times of Viet Nam shall
not be the propaganda-tool of any
party or faction; on the'contrary,
the Times of Viet Nam will always
try to remain free platform whence
any democratic opinion could find
its own expression."
.The weekly newspaper carries
Vietnamese news, special national
features such as "Rice: Product
Number One of Viet Nam," "People
in the News" column and business
and financial news.
The paper says in its lead story,
"At this moment the question of
elections for an assembly in Viet
Nam is more than a topic for edi-
torial controversies; it is a prob-
lem which means the life or death
of Viet Nam as a democratic na-
tion.
"Aware of the fake-assemblies
which they have experienced in
the past, the Vietnamese wish to
see the future elections ensure the
freedom of vote of every citizens,
and the future assembly to include
the representatives from all poli-
tical parties in Viet Nam.

U' Clinics
Fill Varied
Functions
The growing University clinics
are now treating an average of 850
patients a day'.
"Even with this large number,
we are trying to keep treatment
as individual as possible," Richard
J. Hinds, assistant director of the
Hospital says.
"For instance, with each of the
18 clinics in the Out-Patients
Building, having a lobby of its
own, we have gotten away from
the feeling of congestion."
Each of the 22 clinics -run by
the University has a specialized
function. Such varied fielf of
medicine as surgery, psychiatry
and allergy treatment are repre-
sented by separate clinics.
The majority of those treated
in the clinics have been sent there
by private doctors, according to
Hinds.
In such cases the clinics work
in close conjunction with the
patient's doctor.
"Generally we try to follow the
wishes of the referring physician
concerning the patient as closely
as possible," Hinds explains.
Such patients are billed accord-
ing to their monthly salary and
the number of their dependents.
In no case does the costdexceed
$20 for the standard 21 days of
consultation.
Another type of patient handled
by the clinics is the person need'-
ing medical attention who can't
afford to pay the ordinary fees for
it.
Patients of this kind have to be
admitted by order of a county's
welfare department. The state
government pays for the treatment
and collects the money later from
the county.
The clinics provide for no hos-
pital service, but generally are
what Hinds terms "diagnostic cen-
ters."
The great growth of the clinics
at the University and throughout
the nation is due to such medical
discoveries as antibiotics and peni-
cillin, Hinds says.
Treatments now can be made
easily at a clinic that formerly
could be effected only during a
hospital confinement, he explains.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
FOR SALE
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)123B
FOR SALE-Small desk, coffee table,
twin bed. Must sell. NO 3-6018. )129B
FOR SALE: Collegiate Furnishings for
Apartment-tables, drapes, beds, etc.
NO 2-6983. JO ANNE. After 5. )128B
GOLF CLUBS-Four Wilson K-28 Woods
and eight Spaulding Irons. Good con-
dition. $55. Phone NO 2-0860. )147B
GROMMESH 100 watt amplifier and
Jensen 10 inch speaker and enclo-
sure. Good condition. $20. Call Jerry
after 5:30, NO 2-5695. ) 143B
FOR SALE-20 volume set, The Book of
Knowledge by Americana still in or-
iginal crates. Call GR 5-7221 for fur-
ther information. )144B
USED DAVENPORT, rust color, clean.
$10. 625 S. Forest, side door. Apart-
ment 4. )145B
LOST AND FOUND
PLEASE-Lost, Phi Gamma Delta pin
chained to Alpha Chi Omega pin! In-
estimable value. Phone NO 3-3381.
) 139A
LOST-K.E. 10" Slide rule. Please call
owner at NO 3-2290 or 3-8436. )141A
LOST-green wallet in area of Rack-
ham. Reward. NO 2-0471. )138A
LOST-Green Snorkle pen, Albert P.
Levin engraved lightly. Call 39 Hayden
House, E.Q. )137A
LOST-Elgin watch last weekend. Re-
ward. J. Greene, NO 3-0676. )140J
r.1

1115

BUSINESS SERVICES
FRENCH TUTORING. Editorial Work
on Short Manuscripts. Call NO 3-
2382. )39J
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C-3 Camera with case and flash--
used. $39.95.
Purchase Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone: NO 8-6972
)141B
RE-WEAVING. Burns, tears, moth
holes rewoven. Let us save your
clothes. Weave Bac Shop, 224 Nickels
Arcade. )30J
SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
205 N. Main 207 E. Washington
NO 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."
)36J
SPEECH IMPROVEMENT -- practical
training for professional, business,
social purposes. NO 3-1531, Ext. 296.
)35J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J
USED CARS
1951 CHEVROLET Blue, Two Door. Wil-
liam Hornett, NO 8-8844. )119N
WE NEED USED CARS!
to stock our new lot. We can give you
top allowance on your present car ...
any make or modell Come in and test
drive the new, beautiful 1956 Mercury.
Our low overhead enables us to give
you the top notch deal on a new or
used car in Washtenaw county. Fitz-
gerald, Inc. Iincoln-Mercury, 3345
Washtenaw Rd. Phone NO 3-4197 -
NO 2-3293. )116N

ROOMSEFOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 Male Students.
Cooking privileges. Half block from
campus. 417 E. Liberty. )33D
YOUNG, good-natured landlord needs 2
men students for large double. $7
each per week. 1227 South State. NO
3-1650. )i9D
BOARDERS
BOARDERS WANTED. $10 per week.
Good food. Call NO 8-8400. )13S
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS to California in June via Yel-
lowstone, Grand Canyon, Las Vegas.
NO 2-8444. )40G
FOR RENT
SUITE FOR TWO OLDER BOYS-Board-
ing, convenient to campus. 1328 Ged-
des. )C44
HELP WANTED
STUDENTS and students' wives--Full
and part time sales positions available
in Ann Arbor Area. Car and phone
necessary. For interviews, call NO
2-9903 between 9 A.M. and 5 P.M.
)82Hs
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part time.'
Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H

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Operatic Soprano

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IN ONE OF FOUR
AMERICAN CONCERTS

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DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING TODAY

THERE'S BASEBALL in the air and
Sports Illustrated (20c) on the) Cw
stands. Our student-faculty rate: $4
for 52 issues (8c each). Student Peri-
odical, NO 2-306k. )103F

; .

Tickets-$1.50, $2.00,
$2.50, $3.00, $3.50
frUniversity Musical Society
>'; ,'Burton Tower

8:30 P.M.

Prof. R. Freeman Butts will
speak on "The Tradition of States'
Rights in American Education" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow, in Aud. A,
Angell Hall.

CO~LOR by 09 tU%!*i

presents

you will greatly enjoy

A

OF

o captivating new color film
produced and narrated by
R U BE RT LAVAST I D)
featuring lovely Jamaica
and exotic British Guiana

Organization Notices
Congregational and Disciples Guild: Coffee Hour with guests from the Soci-
Meditations-study (exploring resources ology Dept., today, 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., 2nd
for meditation and prayer), today, 5:10 floor Terrace Room of the UNnion.
to 6:00 p.m., Guild House, 524 Thompl * * *
son. NAACP: Meeting, tonight, 7:00 p.m.,
s sRm. 3G, Union. 0
Episcopal Student Foundation: There * * *
will not be any Inquirer's Classes on Physics Club: Mr. Floyd Cross will
Wednesday or Thursday evenings of this speak on "Application of Binary Com-
week. A meeting for married e puter to Problems in Physics," Mar. 8,
will be held Friday, March 9. Anyone 7:30 p.m., RAm. 2038, Randall Hall.
interested call Canterbury House by : 2 H
Thursday, March 8.
Hillel Foundation: Assembly meeting, Pi Lambda Theta: W. B. Herrin,
tonight, 7:00 p.m., Hillel. Director of Family Service Agency in
Religious Committee meeting, today, Ann Arbor, will speak on "The Agency
4:15 p.m., Hillel. and Related Services in the 'Commun-
* . ity." Mr. Herrin will show a film "Fam-
International Center: Social hour with ily Affair" at the meeting. Open meet-
special guest, Dr. Everett Clinchy, ing tonight, 7:45 p.m., Assembly Room,
Council of Christians andJews, March Rackham Bldg.
8, 4:30-6:00 p.m., International Center. *'*" *
* . . Sociedad Hispanica: "Tertulia," con-
League House Judiciary: The meet- versation in Spanish, today, 3:30-5:00
ing for 4:30 p.m. today, has been can- p.m., Michigan Union Cafeteria.
celled. 0 "
*e" *. Ullr Ski Club: Meeting, tonight, 7:30
Le Cercie Francais: The film, "La p.m., Union. Election of officers will
Chartreuse de Parme," will be shown be held, and plans for the spring
tonight, 6:45 p.m., in Kellogg Auditor- vacation trip made. It is urgent that
ium. all members and interested people be
* * * there.
Lutheran Student Association: Len- * *
ten\ service followed by a class on Westminister Student Fellowship:
Luther's Small Catechism, tonight; 7:15 Bible Study, Mar. 8, 9:10 p.m., Presby-
p.m., Lutheran Student Chapel, terian Student Center.
* * * Morning Devotions, March 8, 7:00 a.m.,
Michigan Union: Student-Faculty Presbyterian Student Center.

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March 11, 3:00 P.M.

DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
327 S. Fourth Ave. (Masonic Temple)
Box office open daily 10-5 Phone NO 2-5915 early for reservations
Admission $1.65 Students 99c

PATTENGILL AUDITORIUM
105 South State Street
General Admission, $1.00

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Natural Color
Tickets --$1.10
(unreserved section-50c)
BOX OFFICE OPENS
TOMORROW 10 A.M.

DANNY KAYE
THE
COURT JESTER
GLSIL ANGLA CCIL
GLYNS ONSPATI4BONE LANSBURY' PWRK[R
Vws a'4 Mksie ~s# IFne 94 sarmvCahrt
WpodPirectiediNOPJM PANNP~YFMANJ K
Color byTECHN!COLOR

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Coming
Thursday

Starting
Thursday

i ..r.w..W s PM

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Members
1.50

Non-Members
1.75

Reservations Required by March 15

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PR.E LIST

Hillel
Members

Non-Members
and Guests

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Dial
NO 2-2513

AA

Special Rate for all 8 meals .................. .$14.20

First Seder or Second Seder ....a. ..........

3.50

$17.70
3.75
7.50

Both Seddrim ...........*...*.*............... 6.50
Each Lunch ........... .............. . 1.10
Each Dinner .............................. 1.95

1.45
2.50

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MAIL COUPON TO HILLEL, 1429 Hill, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Enclosed is cash or check drawn to "Hillel,
Passover" for $ to cover cost of:
[1 All 8 meals1
Q Seder, Monday Q Dinner, Wednesday I
SdLunch, Tuesday ~Q Lunch, Thursday
1F1 Seder, Tuesday Fn Dinner, Thursday

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