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March 03, 1956 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-03

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TH M CMGAN DAILY

SATVRDAY. MARCH & 1658

THE MICHIGAN DAILY S ATT~flAV~ IWAIWW ~

ti..ai VaLa iay l iC1 Ll\ 1; J. lijJV
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I

OLLBERG'S 'YOU AND TV':
Mysteries of Television Answered in Recent Booldet

By ALLAN STILLWAGON
Do you know how the picture is
formed on your television set?
or how a television camera
works?
Or why TV studios usually have
thousands of vacuum tubes?
These and a number of other
common questions about the mys-
tery of television are answered for
the layman in a new booklet,
"You and TV, by Robert Stoll-
berg, president of the National
Science Teacher's Association.
After a short, basic explanation
of the fundamentals of electricity,
Stollberg plunges into a lucid ex-
planation of picture tubes. Estab-
lishing that the picture tube is a.
specialized vacuum tube, he illus-
trates the fundamental operations
of its components. The electrons
in a picture tube are "shot" from
an electron gun at the back. The
cathode, heated by a powerful
electric heater, is the source of a
stream which is guided by deflec-
tion coils back and forth, up and
down the surface of the tube's
face.
A special deice called a control
grid controls the strength of the'
electron-beam and therefore the
brilliance of the picture. The min-
ute and temporary glow caused by
tiny bombardments on the sur-
face, multiplied by the thousands,
makes up the final image.
Studio Tour
Next, the reader is taken on a
* tour of a typical television studio,
into the heart of a television cam-
era. The camera, a complex elab-
oration of an ordinary Kodak, and
an electric eye, uses a process sim-
ilar in part to that in the home
receiver. An image of the per-
formers is formed by a lens on a
plate consisting of thousands of
tiny electric eyes. When light falls
on the eyes they produce an elec-
trial charge proportional to the
strength of the light. This series
of charges forms the video signal,
which is amplified and broadcast
from the TV transmitter.
In order that the reader might
understand the process by which
sight and sound are sent from the
studio to the home, radio waves
are reviewed next. Illustrations
tell the story of amplitude modu-
lation (AM) and frequency modu-
lation (fm). The line-of-sight path
of very high frequency waves, used
by both television and FM broad-
asting makes the construction of
coaxial cables and microwave relay
stations necessary.
Having a pretty good idea of
what happens in the TV station
and how a picture is actually
formed on a picture tube, the scene
shifts to the other fundamental
parts of the set.
Set Fundamentals
Starting at the antenna, which
is "aimed' for two sections of the
channel lineup (the large dipole
for lower channels 2 through 6,
and the smaller for higher han-
nels 7 through 13) travels down
twin-lead lead wires, to the re-
ceiver. Here, the fundamental steps
in the operation of a simple radio
circuit are reviewed. The steps
usually take' place in this order.
1. The radio signal from the
antenna is tuned, ,selecting the
signal desired, and "throwing-out"
the extras.
2. The selected signal is am-.
pified-
3. The stronger signal is chang-
ed into an electrical signal similar
to the one produced when the
sound struck the microphone at
the studio. This step is usually
called detection or de-modulation.
4. This detected signal is am-
plified some more.

5. The amplified electrical signal
is changed into sound.
These same five basic steps occur
in both the audio and video por-
tions of the home receiver, with
the exceptions that many addi-
tional substeps are included in the
vastly more complex circuits of
television. Step five additionally
changes electrical signals into both
sight and sound.
A look into the future is at-
tempted. It is hard to predict what
will or will not be true about
television five years or even five
months from ndw, but some de-
velopments are almost sure to
make an appearance.
New T. V. Uses
Non-commercial television, now
in extensive use throughout the
world, provides an ever-increasing
field of application. Television in
the operating room, in. both black
and white and color has proved
its value long ago. Military televi-
sion not only provides command-
ers on the ground a "bird's-eye-
view" of battle conditions, but
enables ground bound pilots of
guided missils to see a clear pic-
ture of the conditions ahead of
his ship. In general, closed circuit

ing to pay for movies or super-
spectacular productions in the
home.
Finally, ultra - high - frequency
and color television loom in the
horizon. UHF channels, the range
of which extends from 300 to 3,000
million cycles per second are now
being assigned to those cities with
no other TV facilities. In other
areas, battles rage over allocation
of the 12 VHF channels which all
sets in the country receive without
addition of special attachments or
converters.
Color Television
Although color sets remain in
the luxury class, dealers all over
the country report heavy sales of
this revolutionary new form of en-
tertainment. Daily program sche-
dules indicate a relatively high
percentage of color shows being
broadcast both nationally and lo-
cally. Color television may never ;
replace black and white, but it is
sure to ,be common within a very3

short time. fundamental understanding of its
Whatever the future of televi- secrets is a must for those who
sion, many surprises lie in store. A would understand what is to come.
D9MLY OFFICIAL BULLETIN~

for Summer and Regular Research, De-
vel,. and Design.,
Honeywell Regulator Co., Chicago, Ill.
and Minneapolis, Minn.-all levels in
Aero., Elect., Ind., Instru., Mat., Math.,1
Mech., Engrg. Mech., Metal., Physics,
and Science for Research, Devel., Design.,
Prod., and Sales. U.S. citizens.
Pittsburgh-Des Moines Steel Co.,
Pittsburgh, Penn.-all levels in all pro-
grams for Research, Devel., Design,
Prod., Constr., and Sales.
Wright Air Devel. Center; Wright-
Patterson A.F.B., Ohio-all levels in
Aero., Ch. E., Civil, Elect., Ind., Instru.,
Mat., Math., Mech., Eng. Mech., Metal.,
Nuclear, Physics for Research and De-
vel. U.S. citizen.
The Warner & Swasey Co., Cleveland,
Ohio-B.S. and M.S. in Elect., Ind.,
Math., Mech., Eng. Mech., Metal, and

Physics for Research, Devel., Design,
Prod., and Sales.
Freeport Sulpher Co., New Orleans,
La.-B.S. and M.S. in Naval and Marine;
all levels in Ch. E., Instru., ant Metal.;
B.S. and M.S in Mech for Research,
Devel., and Prod.
The Garrett Corp., Los Angeles, Calif.
-all levels in Civil, Constr., Mater.,
Municipal, Naval and Marine and Sani-
tary, PhD in Eng. Mech and Metal for
Summer and Regular Research, Devel.,
and Design.
Northrop Aircraft, Inc., Hawthorne,
Calif. for all levels in Aero., Civil,
Elect., Math., Mech., Eng. Mech. and
Physics to work in Devel. and Design.
U.S. citizen.
Thurs., Fri., March 8, 9:
The Glenn L. Martin Co., Baltimore,
Md.-all levels in Aero., Chem. E., Civil,

Elect., Instru., Mat., Math., Mech.. Eng. Toledo Edison Co., Toledo, Ohio-B.S.
Mech., Metal., Naval and Marine, Nu- in ELec, and Mech. for Operating, and
clear, Physics, and Science for Summer Etwr. Dept.
and Reular Research Devel., Designilt cotac the Engrg
and Analysis. U.S. citizens. P1 icenat Office, 347 W. ., tExt. 2182.
Socorny i1ohil Oil Co., Inc., Newi 'Yorh,
N.Y.-all levels in Che. E., E e In-rt-- -
str.. Mcch.. Nuclear, an Science for I INTERVTEW NOTICE:
Summer and 1 ular Devel., cad Prod. There will be ineetiNus on Tues.
Fri.. March 9: March 6, One at 2:00 and one at 3:00,
Chrysler Corp., Chrysler Inst. of in room 3G of the Michigan Uhion for
Enzrg., iizhland Pork, Mh. all men md women interested in overseas
levels in Aero.. Cie. E.. Civil.E, I ncc ., employent with the Army Special
Instr., Almat.. Alath., M1ch., En'. Mech., Serrices Div. Positions are available
Metal.. Naval and Marine. NuItclar. Ph-.in Sports Direction, Recreation, Library
Sics and Science for Research, Devel.. Work, and Arts and Crafts. It is not
Design, and Procduetion.lit (I ucer: i to make n appointment to
Essa S andard Oil Co., Baion Ronue, .attend one of these meetings.
La.-all levels in Che.E. Phyics, and F'or further information contact the
Chem. for Research and Dvel, U.S. Bureau of Appointmncuts, 3528 Admin.
citizens. Bldg, Ext. a71.

I'

(Continued from Page 4)
School)--Teacher Needs: Italian/Science
or Comnmerce.
Lakeview, Oregon - Elementary; 8th
grade Social Studies/Language Arts;
High School Girls Physical Ed; Social
Studies; Commercial; Librarian; Eng-
Ush; English/Math.
State of Colorado-All fields.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 3528 Adminis-
tration Building, NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will be at the Engrg. School:
Tues., March 6:
Long Island Lighting Co., Hicksville,I
N.Y.-B.S. and M.S. in Elect. and Mech.1

for Summer and Regular Devel, Design,
Prod, Const., Sales, Power Station Oper-
ation, Maintenance, System Operations.
Haven-Busch Co., Grand Rapids,
Mich.-B.S. and M.S. in Civil, Constr.,
and Mech. Engrg. Sales Trainee. U.S.
citizen.
Wed., March 7:
U.S. Naval Ordnance Plant, U.S. Geo-
logical Survey, U.S. Weather Bur., U.S.
Civil Service Region 7, Gen' Services
Admin.-ail levels in all programs for all
phases of Engrg., countrywide, U.S.
citizens.
Thurs., March 8:
American Metal Products Co., Detroit,
Mich.-all levels'in Aero., Constru.,
Elect., Ind., Instru., Mat., Mech., Math.,
Eng. Mech., Metal., Physics and Science

SpornCoffee, See Le

4

f.1

Come

to Church

Sunduy

r

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M, 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions Wadnesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
THE/CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays--10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herold of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
6:30 P.M. Young friends fellowship supper
meeting.
Mr. Ralph Cooper will discuss Summer Service
Project of the American Friend's Service
Comm.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland. .Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Remaking a
Man." Dr. Abbey preaching.
9:30 A.M. Two Discussion Groups. Problems of
Christian Beliefs, and Paul's Faith and World
Religion.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper.
6:45 P.M. Worship and Program. Rev. Fuller,
Minister of the Memorial Christian Church,
will speak on Prayer.
7:30 P.M. Fireside Forum
WELCOME TO WESLEY FOUNDATIONS ROOMS,
OPEN DAILY
ANN ARBOR MENNONITE
FELLOWSHIP
Lane Hall Upper Room
7 P.M. Sunday
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
8 o'clock Holy Communion at St. Andrew's
Church. (Breakfast at the Canterbury House
following the 9 o'clock).
11 o'clock Morning prayer and sermon.
7 P.M. Group discussion on Sacramental Living
at Canterbury House.
8 P.M. Evening prayer and commentary.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue,
Ann Arbor, Michigan
$unday 11 A.M.
Mar. 4-Man
Wednesday 8 P.M.
Sunday School 9:30 AM.
Reading Room, 339 South Main. Tuesday to Sat-
urday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday 11 A.M. to
9 P.M., Sunday 2:30 to 4:30,
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10 A.M. Unitarian Adult Group-Mr. Gerald C.
Bailey, U. of M. graduate student in psychol-
ogy on: "The Scientific Approach to the'
Study of Prejudice."
11 A.M. Services of Worship: Rev. Edward H. Red-
man preaching on: "The Parting of the Ways
Between Liberalism and the New Orthodoxy."
7:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Group with Dr.
B. K. Bagchi, U. of M. Department of Psychi-
atry, on "Oriental Religions."

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ),
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship. Sermon: MARRIAGE
AND FAMILY LIVING.
9:45 A.M. Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M., Memorial Christian Church. Speaker:
Professor Preston Slosson: CURRENT TRENDS
IN THEOLOGY.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with sermon by the Rev. H. F. Wind, D.D., of
St. Louis, Mo., Exec. Secy, of the Department
of Social Welfare of The Lutheran Church--
Missouri Synod.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program, with talk by Dr.
Wind on "Serving the Lord Through Social
Welfare Activities."
Wednesday at 7:30: Lenten Vesper Service, with
sermon by the pastor, "Why Christ Faced
Trial."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10:30 Divine Liturgy
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director.
10:45 A.M. Worship Service. Sermon: "We Be-
lieve in the Fellowship of the Church."
7 P.M. Student Guild.
Wednesday, 7:30 P.M.-Midweek Lenten Service.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min.
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
Sunday, March 4:
9:45-The Student Class will continue its study
of the "Parables of Jesus."
11:00-Sermon: "True Religion" Rev. Loucks.
6:45--"Summers Well Spent" given by Mrs.
Nancy Nagler and Miss Sue Gillespie.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock-Sunday School.
11 o'clock Sermon: "The Compassion of Christ."
6 o'clock-Student Guild.
7 o'clock Sermon: "History and the Christian Gos.
pel."
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting.
We welcome you.

WOMEN'S LEAGUE .. . a building with a labyrinth of rooms and a multiplicity of activities.

"Let's go to the league for cof-
fee," is a standard invitation after
classes.
You head toward a large brick
edifice on North University and
go down the stairs into the snack
bar where you gather with friends,
eat a sandwich and occasionally
play cards.
But what goes on in the build-
ing above you? Out of mere
curiosity, one day you decide to
investigate and discover what ac-
tivities go on in the labyrinth. of
rooms and offices in the "other"
portion of the League.
On the first floor you peek into
a large room and find another
cafeteria where meals are served
daily. You make a mental note
of this and proceed down the hall,
past the main entrance where
people are gathered around a tele-
vision set and you stop at an office
which is impressively marked,
Undergraduate Office.
Inside, you see coeds clustered
around a desk, talking animatedly
on phones and in general looking
extremely busy with administra-
tive affairs. Deciding not to dis-
turb them, you continue down the
hall and up some stairs into the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre where
students are preparing a set for
that evening's play.
Out the back way, you proceed
up to the second and third floors
and hurry down the corridors
glancing in the doors of the li-
brary, listening rooms, meeting
rooms, the ball room and rooms
with no official titres.
By this time, you're awfully
tired, but your curiosity is still
whetted and you continue up to
the fourth floor. On this level
you find a maid cleaning a hotel
room and you have a chance for
8, fleeting glance into a neat, trim
bedroom before ending your tour
of the League.
With your brain reeling with the
intricacies of the building and your
feet tired from so much walking,
you decide to take the elevator
down to the first floor and return
once again to the familiar envi-
ronment of the snack bar. But
you resolve never again to think
so lightly of the League, as only
a place in which to drink coffee
with friends.
Story By
DONNA HANSON
Pictures By
SAM CHING

4

CAFETERIA UNDERGRADUATE OFFICE ... the center of coed activities.
... where meals are served daily

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE ... center of University play.'

LIBRARY ... a quiet place to study.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Win. S. Baker, University Pastor'
Patricia Pickett, Assistant
Sunday: Bible Study at SAE house, 9:00 A.M.
Seminar: "The Problems of Faith" in the Student

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
10:45 A.M.-Church School and Junior Church
in Douglas Chapel.
10:45 A.M.--Public Worship. Dr. Parr will give
the third sermon of the series "Faiths Men
Live By," the subject being "A Rainbow Is
as Real as a Derrick," (Richard LeGallienne).
7:00 p M.-Student uildA will meet nt Mmn.eo

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