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March 03, 1956 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


'HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH! 3, 1950

I

Music School
Requests 12
Guinea Pigs'
Music school is looking for
"guinea pigs" to take free lessons
in piano and voice.
The practice teaching classes of
Profs. Helen Titus and Harold
Haugh of music school are looking
for students on whom they may
practice their methods.
About twelve students are need-
ed for each of these classes. They
must be willing to see the lessons
through for the semester. There
will be no charge.
Piano students should be of the
intermediate level, having had
from three to four years previous
experience. No experience is need-
ed for those interested in v o i c e
lessons.
The only requirement is that
the piano students have a place of
their own to practice.
Prof. Haugh will interview stud-
ents at 10 a.m. today in Auditori-
um. A, Angell Hall. Prof. Titus
will be at her studio, Rm. 219,
Music School, between 10 a.m. and
noon today for those interested in
piano lessons.
Rievision PYlanned'
For Registration
The Basement of Waterman
Gymnasium will be revised, for re-
gistration next fall, Edward G.
Groesbeck, director of the Office
of Records and Registration, re-
vealed yesterday.
Some though had been given to
using the Intramural Building,
Groesbeck said, but the idea was
disgarded.
The classification area upstairs
will be enlarged with the assessing
processes moved downstairs.
"It is more convenient to hold
registration in Waterman than in
the IM building and with the en-
larged basement area we'll have
enough room," Groesbeck com-
mented.
Cinema Guild
Cinema Guild now has petitions
ready for campus organizations
who wish to sponsor programs in
order to raise money.
Petitions may be picked up at
the SGC offices. Interviews will
take place March 10.
TeWUERTH
The Higher the Reward ...
The Hotter the Gun!
WARNER BROS. PRESENTm
RAN DOLPH
_rC T

UNIVERSITY PRESS BUILDING
*.. the Ann Arbor cows just got out of jail

MILK FROM ALL OVER THE WORLD:
U' Press Moves 'Into New1 Quarters

By TED FRIEDMAN
The University Press began mov-
into gleaming new glass, metal and
brick headquarters at 412 'May-
nard Thursday.
Although the $120,000 structure
is not entirely completed, the Uni-
versity Press has already set up
offices in the new building.
The German-born director, Fred
D. Wieck, explained that the Press
handles scholarly works, texts, and
books addressing the general pub-
lic. As a publisher, it selects the
books to be printed, and directs
their production.
Cows and Publishers
However, director Wieck em-
phasized the distinction between
publishing and printing.
"We publish and that's all we
do," he said with concern, appar-
ently disturbed by the frequency of
misunderstanding along this line.
"Publishers don't print. There is
as much difference beween a pub-
lisher and a printer as between a
dairy and a cow.
"This is the dairy and we buy
milk from all over the world."
Then, with obvious relish at the
analogy, he explained that though
they received their material
"mainly from Ann Arbor cows,"
they publish boos of excellence
regardless of the location of the
author.
Screening
Before any manuscript is ac-
cepted for publication, it must
pass a screening board composed
of specialists at the University.
The University Press is "not a ser-
vant of the faculty so much as a
servant of scholarship," he said.
Unlike some other universities'
presses, it refuses to accept every-
thing faculty members submit.
Wieck explained how instructors
are often under pressure to pub-
lish in order to win promotion.
In universities where every book
submitted by faculty members is
automatically published, the status
of the press is in danger of be-
coming that of "the night-watch-
man."
"We have a quality control
w h i c h commercial publishers
normally cannot match. The books
which are put through the screen-
ing of University knowledge, are
likely to be better than books with-
out that screening," he said.
Expansion
The University Press is passing
through a period of rapid expan-
sion. Book distribution this year
will be nearly three times what it
was last year, and it is expected
to double again next year.
'Before the year is completed, the
University Press plans to enter
the field of music publishing.
"This is unprecedented," Wieck
said. "Music publishing is gener-
ally considered a speciality, and
Journalism Dept.
Included in Study
The University's Department of
Journalism has been included in
an extensive study of the instruc-
tion programs of leading journal-
ism schools throughout the nation.
The 817 page study, directed by
Prof. James H. Herring of Mar-
shall College, W. Va., reveals a
marked growth in the schools' pro-
grams from 1940 to 1951.
A considerable increase has
taken place in such areas as sem-
inars, research, radio news writ-
ing and broadcasting, the study
shows.

no other American university press
is engaged in the systematic pub-
lishing of music scores."
Wieck appears well suited for his
work, since he has strong feel-
ings about literature.
Adventure in Time and Space
"I believe that the greatest con-
quest of time and space," he an-
nounced," are books. Compared
to them, the airplane is nothing.
Man will abandon the printed
word just as soon as he abandons
the wheel.
"Books simply refuse to stay
dead."
Wieck, who refuses to read
newspapers because they have too
much misinformation, is a large
energetic blond man with just a
trace of a German accent.
"English is a wonderful lang-
uage," he said. "I know two or
three others, but there's none like
English.
"In German you cap get away
with foggy thinking. In English,
if you don't know what you want
to say, you end up with gobble-de-
gook."
University presses are almost
unknown outside America and
England. "It's a peculiar Anglo-
American practice," he said.
"Publishing in the nameof uni-
versities goes back to the thirteen-
Lab Develops
Stellar Heat
The 15,000 degree heat of the
stars, reproduced for a split second
in a University physics laboratory,
is giving astronomers a better un-
derstanding of the temperature
and composition of these celestial
bodies.
Nearly three times that at the
surface of the sun, the tempera-
ture is generated in a long, narrow
instrument called a shock tube,
after a diaphram separating gases
under extremely high and low
pressures is broken, producing a
powerful shock wave.
Since heat is the energy of atoms
in motion, the violently-agitated
gas particles in the wake of the
shock reach high temperatures.
Part of the heat is dissipated in
the form of brilliant light.
So short-lived is the shock wave
that it does not have time to heat
the walls of the tuhet
As the wave passes a small win-
dow at the end of the tube, physi-
cists measure its speed, then calcu-
late its temperature from special
equations.
By observing the characteristic
light of the agitated atoms in the
shock tube, physicists gather data
on known conditions that can be
used by astronomers to check their
interpretations of stellar spectra.
Eugene B. Turner, research as-
sociate of the Engineering Re-
search Institute, belives that the
tube will be valuable in helping
to determine the amounts of ele-
ments present in the stars. The
presence of these eler-ents can
now be detected, he notes, but
there is no reliable way to measure
the quantity.
Brauer To Speak
Dean Jerald C. Brauer, member
Federated Theological Faculties,
University of Chicago, will address
the annual Michigan Student
Christian convocation at 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m. today in the Rackha
building.

th century. It was started in
England by Oxford University
Press with the encouragement of
the Crown," he continued.
Founded in '30's
Michigan's University Press was
founded in the '30's, he explained.
Until the present building was
erected, Wieck's office was in the
General Library, and the other
University Press offices were scat-
tered in three locations through-
out campus.
"To move into the new building
was like getting out of jail," Wieck
concluded.
Sin gers Get
Met Honors
Runners-up in the Great Lakes
Regional Auditions of the Metro-
politan Opera Association held in
Cleveland last Monday were
Thomas Tipton, Spec., and Hildred
Kronlokken, Grad.
Tipton received $200 and Miss
Kronlokken $100 in the auditions,
which give potential opera per-
formers a chance to be heard with-
out going to New York City.
Ninety-five contestants audi-
tioned. Fifteen finalists were se-
lected by Max Rudolf, assistant
manager of the Met at WHK Aud-
itoriun .
Winner of the competition was
Robert David Nagy of Cleveland,
who will receive $300 and a free
week's trip to New York, where he
will audition at the Met.
Tipton did his undergraduate
work at Michigan State Univer-
sity and studied privately in New
York before coming to the Uni-
versity. He is a teaching fellow
in the music school.
He sang for two seasons with
the New York City Opera Com-
pany and has also sung with sym-
phony orchestras in the Midwest.
He began serious study after his
discharge from the Army nine
years ago.
Miss Kronlokken will receive her
master's degree in June. She is
also a teaching assistant in voice.
She studied at Luther College, De-
corah, Ia.
Both Tipton and Miss Kronlek-
ken will audition at the Met to
appear on the air with the com-
pany in the fall. They will also
sing for the Rotary club in Cleve-
land on Thursday and have made
tentative plans to appear with the
Cleveland Symphony March 11.
In April Tipton and Miss Kron-
lokken will sing with the Toledo
Symphony in "Carmen."
Tipton studies with Prof. Chase
Baromeo, formerly of the Met,
and Miss Kronlokken is working
with Prof. Harold Haugh.

Fund, Bequest
Starts Alumni
Scholarships
The Laurel Harper Seeley and
Lucy Elliott scholarships for
women, offered by the Alumni As-
sociation of the University, are the
result of the interests of two wo-
men in furthering the position of
women students and helping those
who are self-supporting.
The two scholarships were es-
tablished by memorial fund and a
bequest.
The Lucy Elliott award, a $750
fellowship for graduate women,
was begun in 1930 on Miss Elliott's
death. She was active in the De-
troit Women's City Club and the
Detroit Association of University
of Michigan Women. In addition,
she had been social director of
Helen Newberry Residence and
served as Dean of Women for the
summer session.
The Seeley award began as a
bequest of 500 shares of stock by
Laurel Harper Seeley, an Ann Ar-
bor resident since 1902, a graduate
of Michigan State Normal Col-
lege, and a member of the Adelia
Cheever board.
These four scholarships are
available to graduate or under-
graduate women and are for $200
each.
Applications for the awards may
be obtained at the Alumnae Coun-
cil office in the League, and are
due on March 30.
U' Expands
Med. School
Since 1951, The University has
accomplished the equivalent of
establishing a new medical school,
Robert L. Williams, assistant dean
of the faculties, told the Saginaw
Kiwanis club recently.
By admitting 50 more freshman
students during each of the past
four years, The Medical School has
increased its enrollment by 200.
Williams discussion topic was
"Our Students, Our Faculty, and
Our Services to the State."
"The University is one of the
five great universities in the coun-
try," he said.
He predicted an enrollment of
about 22,300 for next year at the
University and about 40,000 by
1970.,
Two out of every three students
come from Michigan, Williams
said, with the representation from
around the state in accordance
with the spread of population.
It makes no difference whether
they come from big or small
schools. The same percentage suc-
ceed.
Williams also stated that the
occupations of parents of Univer-
sity students coincides with t h e
distribution of occupations as a
whole.
Medical Education
To Be Discussed
Wayne Whitaker, assistant dean
of the University medical school
will discuss modern methods of
"Medical Education" at 5:15 p. m.
today over WWJ-TV on "Accent:
A Michigan Report."
Requirements for medical stud-
ents and the cost of education at
this university will be outlined. In
analysis of the types of students
in medical school, Whitaker will

disprove the notion that a doctor's
son has the best chance of being
admitted.

20
NC

*EIIS&Dr

SMITH'S FLOOR COVERINGS
5 N. Main 207 E. Washington
D 3-8321 NO 2-9418
Complete floor coverings shops
Headquarters in Ann Arbor for:
Armstrong linoleum and tile
Mohawk and Bigelow carpets
Guaranteed installation or
"do-it-yourself."

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.30
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday
Phone NO 2-3241
BUSINESS SERVICES
MRS. VAN AKKEREN
now at
620 Church St.
Sweaters mended
)375J

I

)36J
SPEECH IMPROVEMENT - practical
training for professional, business,
social purposes. NO 3-1531, Exut. 296.
)35J
RICHARD MADDY - VIOLINMAKER.
Fine, old certified instruments and
bows. 310 S. State. NO 2-5962. )31J
USED CARS
CALL ON THIS ONE!
1952 Chevrolet, 10,000 miles on tires.
Radio and heater. NO 3-5192. )118N
1947 FORD TUDOR, Radio, Heater,
Spotlight. Good mechanical condition,
cheap. NO 2-4551, Don or NO 3-6408,
Bernie. )117N
WE NEED USED CARS!
to stock our new lot. We can give you
top allowance On your present car
any make or model! Come in and test
drive the new, beautiful 1956 Mercury.
Our low overhead enables us to give
you the top notch deal on a new or
used car in Washtenaw county. Fitz-
gerald, Inc. lincoln-Mercury, 3345
Washtenaw Rd. Phone NO 3-4197-
NO 2-3293. )116N

ROOMS FOR RENT
ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 Male Students.
Cooking privileges. Half block from
campus. 417 E. Liberty. )33D
WILL RENT to Univ. male student.
Attractive room in private home.
Phone NO 8-6037. )32D
ROOMS FOR MEN - Doubles $7.00,
Dorm $5.00. Two blocks from Michi-
gan Union. Phone NO 2-9311 (Meal
Hours) or NO 2-6491 (Evenings). )31D
YOUNG, good-natured landlord needs 2
men students for large double. $7
each per week. 1227 South State. NO
3-1650. )29D
MEN STUDENTS-=Single at 518 E. Wil-
liam. Singles and doubles at 426 Ham-
liton Place.
CAMPUS TOURISTS
Phone NO 3-8454 )19D
FOR SALE
B & L MICROSCOPE, Extra oculars and
case. $65. Phone NO 5-5479. )142B
NEW SHIPMENT of fish and plants are
in. University Aquarium, 328 E. Lib-
erty, NO 3-0224. )140B
"PURCHASE FROM PURCHASE"
Argus C-3 Camera with case and flash-
used. $39.95.
Purchase Camera Shop
1116 S. University Phone: NO 8-6972
)141B
FOR SALE-Small desk,* coffee table,
twin bed. Must sell. NO 3-6018. )129B
FOR SALE: Collegiate Furnishings for
Apartment-tables, drapes, beds, etc.
NO 2-6983. JO ANNE. After 5. )128B
ARMY, NAVY type oxfords-$6.88, sox
39c, shorts 69c, military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.
)1238
BOARDERS
BOARDERS WANTED
PHONE NO 8-6641 and
ASK FOR STEWARD )11S
BOARDERS WANTED - Reasonable
rates. Call NO 3-5806. House Manager.
)14S
BOARDERS WANTED. $10 per- week.
Good food. Call NO 8-8400. )13S
WANTED TO RENT
APARTMENT to sublet for 2 or 3 girls
during summer. Call Irene after 5 P.M.
3004 Stockwell. )17L

HELP WANTED
CAMP COUNSELORS WANTED
A few openings available for men
and women to serve on staff of ex-
ceptional Northern Michigan Camp.
Interviews held Saturday, March 3
at Union, Room 3G, from '2:00-
5:30 P.M. )88H
STUDENTS and students' wives-Full
and part time sales positions available
In Ann Arbor Area. Car and phone
necessary. For interviews, call NO
2-9903 between 9 A.M. and 5 P.M.
)82H
WANTED-Cab drivers, full or part time.
Apply 113 S. Ashley, Ann Arbor Yellow
and Checker Cab Company. Phone
NO 8-9382. )70H
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
HAS OPENINGS FOR
SECRETARIES, STENOGRAPHERS
TYPISTS
Medical Technologists in the fields o
CHEMISTRY, IO-CHEMISTRY'
BACTERIOLOGY
Good vacation, sick leave policies.
Liberal fringe benefits, excellent
working conditions.
Apply:
University of Michigan
Personnel Office
3012 Administration Bldg.
Ann Arbor, Michigan
)71H
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS to California in June via Yel-
lowstone, Grand Canyon, Las Vegas.
NO 2-8444. )40G
RIDE WANTED to Miami, Fla. - Spring
Vacation. Will share driving and ex-
penses. Call Joel, 212 Adams, NO 2-
4401. ) 39G
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds
DIAL NO 2-2S13
CHIG

.4

x

BUSINESS SERVICES

RE-WEAVING-Burns, tears, moth holes
rewoven. Let us save your clothes.
Weave Bac Shop, 224 Nickels Arcade.
)30J

ENDS TONIGHT
AMAZING
TRUE LOVE
ADVENTURE!
CO LMBIA PICTURES Prsts
THfREE
STRIPES
Aldo RAY'Phil CAREY. Dick YORK

rt

;

ENJOY
Carry-Out Beer & Wine
Service Served
at the
Del Rio Restaurant
122 West Washington at Ashley
Open 11 A.M. to 12 P.M.
CLOSED TUESDAY Telephone NO 2-9575
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
presents
A 'HENRIK IBSEN
r A
SOLD OUT TONIGHT
FINAL PERFORMANCES!
Tonight & Tomorrow.
Tomorrow 2:30 P.M. & 8:15 P.M.
1111 1 jll Special Performance
8:15 P.M. Sunday
[DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
327 S. Fourth Ave. (Masonic Temple)
Admission $1.65 Students 99c
BOX OFFICE OPEN DAILY 10-5
Phone NO 2-5915 for reservations now!

4

_Y1

Also Cartoon - Sport - News

I

Take off that apron, my dear,
I'm taking you out! We're
having Sunday dinn e at the'
famous Golden Apples Room
at the Tower Hotel.
FAMILY DINNER
Children's portions.
Serving Sunday Dinner
12 to 9:30 P.M.
Smorgasbord 5 to 9" P.M.
7*iA Oe'NiU 47P't

1'

Also
She was afraid ... too Late!

1~

LATE SHOW TONIGHT
11 P.M.

Organization Notices
East Quad Radio Club: WCBN-EQ- Church, Dexter, Michigan, will speak on
There will be a staff meeting for the "The Meaning of Faith," March 4, 4:00
members of the East Quad radio station, p.m., Lane Hall.
today, in the East Quad Council room, * * *
11:00 a.m. This is an important meet- Student Government Council: Na-
ing which no staff member should miss tional and International Committee-
without an approved excuse. Petitioning is now open for the scholar-
* * * ship to the Free University of Berlin.
*F*S*r This is a student exchange scholarship'
Hillel Foundation: Saturday morning for the academic year 1056-57. Require-
Sabbath services, 9:00r a ill n ments are: 1) A good academic record,
Student Zionist Organization will 2) A knowledge of campus activities, 3)}
spjonsor Israeli folk dancing, Mar. 4, A knowledge of German. Petitioning is
7:00 p.m., Hillel, from March 1 through 16. Petition
Sunday night Supper Club followed by blanks may be secured in Quonset Hut
film, "Song of the Negev," and record A between 3 and 5 p.m. For other in-
dance, 6:00 p.m., Hillel.formation, phone Paul Vitz, NO 2-3176.
Inter-Arts Union: The postponed Pete Student Religious Association: Folk
Seeger concert will take place March Dancing at Lane Hall, Mar. 5, 7:30-10:00
10, in the Nat. Science Aud. Original p.m. in the recreation room. The
tickets are still good. Refunds are Swedish Hambo will be featured. In-
available, however, at Liberty Music struction for every dance and beginners
Shop and The Music Center, if attend- are,welcome.
ance is prohibited. Unitarian Student Group. Dr. Bagchi
* * * will speak on "Religions of India," Mar.
Michigan Christian Fellowship: Rev. 4, 7:00 p.m., Unitarian Church on
Robert Murray, St. James Episcopal Washtenaw Avenue.

1t

li ike tlie.
.1 " s v
and found it smiling right back-at him! '
A wonderful
slice of life..carved ";s>s r ".}ig,. +
out of the whole human :1'{.:"' f"::"'<:>s{'
comedy...sprinkled with
laughter... flavored with
a tear......

4

G in ena'quid.
Saturday at 7 and 9
Sunday atS only
Alec Guinness

Today and
Sunday

ORPHEUM

1:30 P.M.
65c

I

The incomparable FERNANDEL in the year's most
captivating comedy!
"Screamingly comic . . . a slight case of French
murder and mayhem" - N.Y. Times.

4

I

maass

I.Plaved with relish by

r4

I

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