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March 02, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-03-02

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THE MCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 2, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH 2,11)56

,┬░

OSU ds

an

Big

Ten

Swim

Meet

Bill Russell Heads All-American Cagers,
Falls 91 Short of Unanimous Vote

11

Indiana's Woolsey Winner
In 1500; O'Reilly Third-

NEW YORK (N)-Just as im-
pressive in the voting as he has
been in leading San Franciscoto
48 straight victories, 6-foot-10 Bill
Russell dominates the 1956 Associ-
ated Press collegiate All-America
basketball team.
Russell missed a perfect tally
by only 91 points in the voting of
329 sportswriters and broadcasters
announced yesterday.

He received 308 first team votes
and seven second team notations
for an aggregate 1,554 points on
the basis of five for a first and two
for a second. A perfect score would
have been 1,645.
Robin Freeman of Ohio State,
and Darrell Floyd of Furman, like
Russell repeaters from the 1955
All-America, Sihugo "Si" Green of

**
*
Are you interested in Detroit as a work area?

Duquesne and Tom Heinsohn of
Holy Cross, comprise the remain-
der of the team. All are seniors.
Freeman, who is engaged in a
virtual neck-and-neck struggle
with Floyd for major college indi-
vidual scoring honors, was an easy
second in the balloting. He got
1,257 points on 233 firsts and 46
seconds. Green, Duquesne's "one-
man team" polled 861 on 153 and
48 followed by Floyd's 813 on 125
and 94. Heinhorn barely beat our
Ronnie Shavlik of North Carolina
State with 624 points on 98 firsts
and 82 seconds.
Shavlik got 81 firsts and 88 sec-
onds for 581 points to top the sec-
ond team. K. C. Jones, Russell's
San Francisco teammate, was the
only other player to poll over 500
points. He received 519 on 73
firsts and 77 seconds.
Completing the second team are
"Hot Rod" Hundley of West Vir-
ginia with 470 points, Len Rosen-
bluth of North Carolina, 324, and
seven-foot Bill Uhl of Dayton, 322.

By ED SALEM
Special to The Daily
LAFAYETTE, Indiana - Indi-
ana's Bill Woolsey won the 1500
meter freestyle last night, but Ohio
State accumulated more points as
the 1956 Big Ten Swimming Cham-
pionships got underway here at
the Purdue Fieldhouse Pool.
Woolsey easily won the event,
the only one of the evening, in the
creditable time of 19.5:8, but Ohio
State placed men in the second
and fourth positions to give them
eight points. Woolsey's first place
was worth seven points to the
Hoosiers.

JOHN O'REILLY
... cops third place

Jorgensen Breaks Individual
Three-Year Scoring Record

Year by year, each record has
only been the incentive for an-
other.
Mack Supronowicz's total of 634
points for his college career, 1947-
1950, served as a Michigan goal

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MECHANICAL ENGINEERS

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS

CHEMICAL ENGINEERS
CIVIL ENGINEERS

You'll be stepping

out

SCIENCE MAJORS
*
career opportunities in
or write -

smartly in these new
Richman Bros. spring
suits that are arriving
daily and they're priced

.;. T
. 4.

only until Don Eaddy surpassed
this mark witha new high of 823
points last year.
Paul Groffsky, captain of the
1955 cagers, compiled a total of
773 for his cage career, only to be
outdone by teammate Eaddy.
While the Michigan cage fans
had their attention centered on
high-scoring Ron Kramer, team
captain Tom Jorgensen, by virtue
of a 45-point performance in two
weekend games, boosted his career
total to 828 points and set a new
mark.
Winding up a cage career which
was considerably marred because
of a bad leg, Jorgensen is sporting
an average of 11.8 points Per game
in 12 conference contests. His .868
free throw shooting average is
second in the Big Ten, which is
headed by Indiana's Hallie Bryant
with .891.
Kramer Averaging 21
The inimitable Ron Kramer, who
is averaging 21.0 points per game
in 12 conference battles this sea-
son, is the only Michigan basketeer
to ever shoot over 20 points per
game. At present, he is sixth in
the Big Ten jindividual scoring
race and is only .8 of a point away
from the third slot.
In his two years of cage play,
Kramer has hit for 766 points, just
68 short of Jorgensen's three-year
mark.
Records are made to be broken
and when Tom Jorgensen set his
new mark, he put up a sign which
reads, "Here's a New Target."
And Mr. Kramer is the man
who's got his eye right on the
bulls-eye.

Due to the time needed to swim
the required distance, the event
was run in three heats, with poin*
being awarded for the six best
times. All of the top five per-
formances of the night occurred
in the third heat.
O'Reilly Third
Michigan's Captain John O'Reil-
ly swam the event i nthe fastest
time of his career to cop third
place honors for the Wolverines.
He finished just four seconds be-
hind ther Buckeye's Jerry McNa-
mee, although at one point he was
only 20 yards behind.
O'Reilly got ofT to a poor start
but after each of the 65 lengths
of the pool required to complete
the distance found himself gain-
ing on the leaders. Unfortunately,
neither Woolsey or McNamee were
to be cenied as they, too, turned
on the power leaving the Wolver-
ine behind.
Michigan's only other entry in
the race, Harrison Wenner, swam
an excellent race and finished sec-
ond in his heat. However, his time
was only the eighth best of the
night.
Valuable Points
Ohio State picked up other valu-
able points, as Rocco Cirigliano
managed to beat both Earl Ellis
of Iowa and Jack Beattie of MSU
for fourth place honors. Ellis and
Beattie gaining fifth and sixth
places, respectively.
Team honors thus far, in addi-
tion to OSU, go to Indiana in
second with seven points. Gus
Stager's Wolverines have garnered
only four points giving them a
third. The remainder of the list
includes Iowa with two and Michi-
gan State with a single point, fol-
lowed by the other four squads
which failed to place.
Final Events
Four final events will take place
this afternoon, namely, the 50 and
220 yd. freestyle races, 200 yr.
backstroke,t and200 yd. butterfly.
This evening will feature the 400
yd. freestyle relay and the one
meter diving competition. An in-
jury received by Buckeye Glen
Whitten makes his competing
doubtful in the diving event.

1

&

>1

For
call

the utility field,

*
*
*

x

Operations Staff Department

at only ...

$3950

U

_ 'fit,\f
n
A.

I

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415 Clifford St., Detroit 26, Michigan
Phone: WOodward 5-8000

"Local Home of Richman Bros. Clothing"
ANN ARBOR CLOTHING
113 South Main St.

Take the right step toward a.

See theU representative on March 5th-6th

SCIENTISTS,

I-M Scores
BASKETBALL
Professional Fraternity
Phi Delta Epsilon 37, Phi Rho
Sigma 31
Law Club 23, Delta Theta Phi 21
Nu Sigma Nu 31, Delta Sigma
Delta 29
Phi Delta Phi 34, Alpha Kappa
Kappa 19
Phi Alpha Delta┬░39, Alpha Kap-
pa Psi 13
Phi Chi 31, Psi Omega 28
Delta Sigma Pi over Hospital
(forfeit)
Phi Alpha Kappa 74, Alpba
Omega22
Independent
Evans Scholars 31, Owens House
30
PADDLEBALL
Social Fraternity
Delta Tau Delta 2, SAE 0
Pi Lambda Phi 3, Theta Chi
Sigma Nu 3, Delta Upsilon 0
Sigma Phi Epsilon 3, Alpha Ep-
silon P1 0
Phi Gamma Delta 2, Alpha Tau
Omega 1
Lambda Chi Alpha 3, Tau Kap-
pa Epsilon 0
WATER POLO
Residence Halls
Winchell 1, Allen-Rumsey 0
Chicago 5, Gomberg 0
Williams 3, Hayden 2
FACULTY-STUDENT
VOLLEYBALL
Cooley 3, Sociology 1
Michigan 3, Physical Education
0
Sigma Chi 3, Air Science 1
Evans Scholars 3, English 1

*1
4
V,
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r

APPLIED
MAT H E MA IAN
important on-campus
interviews so n1
North American Representatives
Will Be Here Mar. 1, 2
You'll learn first hand about the advantages
and opportunities in choosing a career with
a future at North American. Here engineers
and scientists are now discovering new
frontiers in four exciting new fields.
AUTONETICS
A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
In the field of cMO -MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-producing new
missile guidance systems, fire and flight control systems, computers
and recorders.
ROCKETDYNE
A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
In the field of ROCKET PRoPULsIoN-the largest producer of large liquid-
propellant rocket engines, more powerful propellants and turbines.
ATOMICS INTERNATIONAL
A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
Peaceful application of ATOMIC ENERGY in any phase of reactor devel-
opment, either for research or power production.
MISSILE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
r.----. - -1 - - . . 7. .-.... s _ar . . . - - - -4 ., . ....4

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Read
Daily
C lassifieds

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Working here at International Harvester's Melrose Park Works near Chicago
are graduate engineers conducting research on an experimental diesel
engine to obtain basic combustion data.

When the representatives
from lB are on your cam-
pus, contact your Placement
Director for personal inter-
view.
Or, if unable to meet with IH
representative at that time,
write to F. D. MacDonald,

The engineer who joins International Harvester joins a sound, long-estab-
lished but progressive company-that represents opportunity for advance-
ment. Harvester has long been associated with leadership in new and improved
products that increase agricultural productivity, result in better transporta-
tion, and assist in construction and the handling of heavy materials.
M npAo maanmech inial.Itiril. metalluriical. chemical. agricultural. and

SEE EUROPE
FOR LESS ON
ALL-STUDENT TRIP
You can save up to $289 on your
trip to Europe . . . if you hurryl
See England, France, Italy, up to
16 other countries. Travel with
other U.S. college students. Have
more fun in a small group of con-
genial travelers of your own age
and inteet. nlvsmo all rat

4.

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V. s r

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