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February 12, 1956 - Image 12

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-12

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rru MICHIGAN ' DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1956

Am THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1958

ancoln's Travels Short Compared
o Journeys of Modern Executives

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Associated Press Newsfeatures Writer
If travel is what broadens the
mind, Abraham Lincoln should
dot have been one of the most en-
lightened Presidents in American
history.
The man whose deep under-
standing and tolerance guided
this country through the Civil
War was not much of a traveler.
If you tried to trace the move-
ments in the life of a modern
President, you'd need half the
globe for a stage. You can do it
for Lincoln with a map of half the
United States. Were it not for
trips to New Orleans during Abe's
youth, you could get by with only
a slice extending from the Mid-
west to the East Coast.
Missed Convention
During a modern presidential
election campaign, a candidate is
sure to visit every section in the
nation at least once. Lincoln not
only did not attend the Republi-
can convention at Chicago in, 1860
when he was nominated, but he
didn't step out of Springfield a
single time during the campaign.
Iincoln had made his mark on
the body politic during the de-
bates between himself and Ste-
phen A. Douglas two years earlier
ina nationally reported contest
for a Senate seat-which Lincoln
lost-and he was willing to abide
by the tradition of that day that
a nominee should not campaign
in his own behalf.
Even after his election, Lincoln
didn't budge from his Springfield
home until it was time to take the
train to Washington for the in-
auguration. Newspaper editors
who clamored for a statement of
the policies he intended to put
into operation were politely di-
rected to his earlier speeches.
With the means of transporta-
tion available today, a President
is likely to turn up almost any-
where on earth for meetings with
chiefs of other nations. But dur-
ing his five years in the White
House, Lincoln was never more
than 150 miles away from Wash-
ington.
Journey Begins
Lincoln's life journey began
near Hodgenville, Ky., where he
was born 247, years ago today,
1809. "The shortand simple an-
nals of the poor" is the way he de-
scribed his childhood, spent help-
ing his family wrest a living from
wilderness homesteads in Ken-
tucky, Indiana and Illinois. Abe
had a total of only one year's for-
mal schooling in his entire life.
He was 19 when he mde his
first long trip away from home, a
trading voyage down the Missis-
sippi to New Orleans with a yung
companion. His first move after
lie left the family hearth to strike
out on his own three years later
was another journey down that
romantic waterway, with a cargo
of barreled pork, corn and live
hogs.
For the next 16 years, his move-
ments were almost entirely re-
stricted to Illinois. He enlisted
during the Black Hawk War of
1832. and got as far north as Wis-
consin, but saw no active combat.
His base for the first six years of
this period was New Salem, where
he operated a store and began
studying law.
He was elected as a representa-
tive to the state legislature four
times and emerged after the cap-
itol" seat was moved from Van-
dalia to Springfield as one of the
leading figures of the Whig party
in Illinois. Established in the state
legislature, he moved to Spring-
fi.eld, married Mary Todd and be-
gan practicing law.

Serves in House
Always active in politics or on
its fringes, he served one term as
an Illinois representative in the
House of Representatives but
nearly destroyed himself political-
ly by going against popular feel-
ing in his home state and calling

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Art Exhibits
On Matisse,
Religion Set,
Two exhibitions, "Immaculate
Heart College" and "Etchings by
Matisse," will be on display in the
Museum of Art in Alumni Memor-
ial Hall during the month of Feb-
ruary.
The first will be hung from
February 1 to 26; the second from
February 11 to March 3.

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Religious Art
The 55 examples of religious art
from Immaculate Heart College,
Los Angeles, will be shown under
the auspices of the Western Asso-
ciation of Art Museum Directors.
Included in the exhibition will be
nine prints, five oils, three water
colors, three drawings, three mos-
aics, and twenty-seven medallions.
Immaculate Heart College has
achieved a renaissance of art root-
ed in religion. It has received
wide attention in this country for
the art produced by its faculty
members and students, who have
won numerous awards.
Sister Magdalen Mary, I.H.M.,
chairman of the College's art de-
partment, in explaining the ob-
jectives of the art program, says:
"Our work might be called Early
Renaissance in organization, By-
zantine in enrichment, medieval
in its Biblical subject matter,
Eastern in its two-dimensional,
non-materialistic emphasis, and
Western in its efforts toward an
active apostolate."
Show Matisse Work
The Matisse exhibition, which
consists of thirty prints selected
from the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller
Print Room, includes a few early
drypoints of 1903 and examples
from the important series of etch-
ings which Matisse created during
1914 and in 1929.
The etchings of 1914 are chiefly
informal portraits of the artist's
family and friends. The second
series, done in 1929 presents stud-
ies of professional models.

U
VALENTINES
--STUDIO TYPE -
,:HALLMARK and NORCROSS
NOWHERE BUT NOWHERE
CAN YOU FIND SUCH A SELECTION
O .ASSHOWN AT
Chester R'obertsGIT
O 12 SOUTH STATE STREET
XC

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a Spanish-American War unnec-
essary and unjustified.nHe was not
nominated for a second term.
It was the slavery issue that
brought him from the sidelines
four years later to challengt the
position of Illinois' famous Demo-
crat, Senator Douglas. Lincoln's
developing powers of. oratory
brought him such notice he found
himself the Illinois spokesman for
the new Republican party. He was
called on to make several out-of-
state speeches, but they attracted
no great attention.
In 1858 Lincoln won the Repub-
lican nomination for the Senate
and it was this- campaign which
produced the great debates be-
tween himself and Douglas. Al-
though he. lost the election,; he
gained a national reputation.
Later he made a tremendous
impression in the East with an ad-
dress delivered in New York City.
Before returning to Illinois from
this trip, he made a swing into
New England, speaking at the ma-
jor cities along the way.
Stays In Capital
This set the stage for his nomi-
nation and election is President.
He took a zig-zag route to Wash-
ington for the inauguration, but
moved little after he once reached
the nation's capital. With the on-
set of the Civil War, his only trav-
els were short visits to the battle
lines, which he considere dvaca-
tions from his responsibilities at
the White House.
An exception was a short trip to
appear at dedication ceremonies
of the battlefield cemetery at Get-
tysburg, Pa., where he gave Amer-
ica in 268 words one of its most
classic documents - the Gettys-
burg Address.
Lincoln's last Journey was the
short carriage ride from the
White House, on Good Friday,
April 14, 1865, to Ford's Theater
in Washington for the final per-
formance of "Our American Cous-
in." It was there he was shot by
John Wilkes Booth. He died in
the modest home of a tailor across
the street from the theater the
following morning.

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