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February 28, 1956 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-28

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0

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE nyuV

Coeds Chosen
To Organize
Annual Event
Chairmen Announced
For Frosh Weekend
Centrctl Committees
The Women's League has an-
nounced the new members of the
Frosh Weekend Central Commit-
tees.
General chairman for the Blue
team is Gerry Wise. She will be
assisted by Lynnette Beall.
Heading the floorshow commit-
tee will be Lenore Fink and she
w i have as her assistant, Alice
Royer.
Publicity Chairman r
Elizebeth Erskine is the new
publicity chairman for the Blue
tearn, with ,Carol Meyer assisting
her.
Decoration committee will be
headed by Judy Mewhort and
Mary Beth Wyss will act as her
assistant. The program chairman
is Sandra Kopper; finance chair-
man is Barbara Meyerson and
tickets chairman is Helen Clark.
In charge of the awards and
judges committee will be Janet
Getty, while Sandra Frost will be
heading the patrons committee
and Joan Higgins the properties
committee.
Maize Team Chairmen
The Maize team for Frosh Week-
end will have Donna Wickham for
its general chairman and she will
be aided by Joann Hodgman. -
In charge of the floorshow com-
mittee is Linda Green, who will be
assisted by Maureen Murphy.
The new publicity chairman for
the Maize team is Libby Sundel
and her assistant is Marcia Bry-
ant.
Decorations Head
Kay Yonkers is in charge of the
decoration committee with Claudia
Taylor assisting her.
Heading the program committee
will be Arline Harris, while Sue
Hattendorf will take charge of the
finance committee.
The tickets committee will have
as its chairman Ethel Buntman,
while the awards and judges com-
mittee will be headed by Betty
Barnett..
Patrons Committee
In charge of the patrons com-
mittee will be Barbara Maier, as
Susan Stokes heads the properties
committee for the Maize team.
The new general chairmen have
set 7 p.m. Thursday for the first
meeting of the combined central
committees of the freshman pro-
ject.
Frosh Weekend will be held Fri-
day and Saturday, April 27 and 28
in the League.
The teams are judged by a point
system on their themes, dances,
entertainment, decorations, pro-
grams and design, tickets sold and
publicity.
Last year the contest ended in
a tie between the Maize and Blue
teams

League Plans rFILMS, DISCUSSIONS, F
Many Events ISA Sche

dules Varied Activities

JOAN HEIDEN DIANE QUINLAN

JEANNE HAGER

'l/L~d's"Jan] 6n agemnti

Heiden-Beaver
The engagement of Joan Heiden
to Fred Beaver, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Freeman Hudson of Detroit,I
was announced recently by her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick O.1
Heiden of Detroit.
Miss Heiden is a junior in the
School of Architecture and Design
and is president of Betsy Barbour
House.
Mr. Beaver is a junior in the
literary college.
The couple plan to be married
on August 25 in Detroit.
Quinlan-Williams
r. and Mrs. John E. Quinlan
of Grosse Pointe Park announce
the engagement of their daughter,
Diane, to Lt. David O. Williams,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Orris R.
Williams of Greenville, Pa.
Miss Quinlan is a junior in the
School of Nursing and is affiliated
with Alpha Xi Delta.
Lt. Williams is a graduate of
Allegheny College and was affili-

ated with Phi Gamma Delta. After
his ter mof service in the U.S.
Air Force, he plans to attend the
University of Pennsylvania law
school.
* * ao
Hager-Samosuk

Detroit, was announced on Dec.
29 by her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
James A. Hager and Mrs. Wallace
G. Tarter of Dearborn.
Miss Hager is a senior in the
School of Education and is affili-
ated with Alpha Delta Pi.
Mr. Samosuk is a senior in the
School of Natural Resources. He
is a member of Phi Delta Theta.

Jeanne Hager's engagement
Andrew Stephan Samosuk, son
Mr. and/ Mrs. Andrew Samosuk

to
of
of

U' Panhellenic Groups Open
Petitioning, Elect President

For Students
Beginning intermediate and ad-
vanced dance instruction is again
being offered at the League this
semester.
The eight-week classes are open
free to coeds. Women interested
in learning new steps or in im-
proving- their dancing, may join
and act as hostesses for the weekly
sessions.
John Urbanic will teach the fox
trot, waltz, polka, jitter-bug and
Charleston. -Lessons will also be
given in such Latin American
numbers as the samba,rhumba,
tango and mambo.
Date Bureau
A special feature of the League
dance classes is the date bureau,
which posts lists of coeds in the
Undergraduate Office, who will
be a "date" for the classes.
Lessons, which began yesterday,
are being offered. Mondays to
advanced couples at 7:15 p.m., with
an exhibition class scheduled for
8:30 p.m.
Every Tuesday and Wednesday,
classes for beginning singles will
be held at 7:15 p.m., while inter-
mediate couples will start at 8:30
p.m.
League Scholarships
Once again the League is offer-
ing three 100 dollar scholarships
to all interested junior coeds.
These scholarships will be
awarded on the basis of participa-
tion in cimpus activities. The
coeds' scholastic achievement and
financial need will also be taken
into consideration.
Applications for the awards may
be picked up in the Undergraduate
Office of the League. Two letters
of recommendation must be sent
directly to Erika Erskine at the
Undergraduate Office.
Coeds To Visit Factory
Foreign and America coeds, par.-
ticipating in the League's "Ameri-
can Friends" program, will journey
to Detroit Tuesday, March 6 to.
tour automobile manufacturing
plants.
Previously, foreign students have
attended the various factories, but
rarely did women go. Recently,
one company arranged a special
program and tour for the women.
Leaving by bus at 6:30 p.m. from
the League, the coeds will be guid-
ed about the plant for approxi-
mately two hours, and will return
to Ann Arbor by 10:30 p.m.
Foreign students 'and their
American big sisters are to call Pat
Dow at NO 2-2547 today.
The "American Friends" pro-
gram was initiated last spring by
the Women's League to acquaint
foreign students with the campus
and its customs.

Continuing with the discussions
and regional evening series initi-
ated recently, the International
S tudents Association plans a full
semester of diverse activities,
First on the ISA calendar will
be the regular Sunday evening film
presentation, which illustrate some
aspect of life in a region or coun-
try of the world.
China will be the subject of this
week's movies, to be offered at
7:30 p.m. Sunday in the recreationI
room of the International Center.
Future Programs
Carrying through until the end
of the semester, the films will deal
consecutively with India, Africa,
Japan, Palestine, the West Indies
and Hawaii, Australia and New
Guinea, Scotland and Ireland, the
American West, Alaska and finally
Portugal and Spain.
On Friday, March 9, a discussion
of a current Indian issue will be
presented at the fourth in a series
between American students and
students who represent a particu-
lar county or region.
It will be held at 7:30 pm. in the
Center.

The series is designed to clarify
misconceptions which Americans
may have about the cultural or
political nature of different coun-
tries.
Other discussions scheduled will
have as their subject Japan, Tur-
key, Africa, Pakistan and Korea. {
Duplicate bridge enthusiasts may
exhibit their skills at a tournament
Saturday, March 10. This will also
be held at the Center and will be
open to all interested persons.
African Evening
Featuring a display of African
handicraft, a cultural program and
social dancing, the African Eve-
ning will' be offered Friday, March
16.
This event marks the third of
another ISA series started last
semester. Presented by the Afri-
can Club, the evening will permit
viewers a varied and intimate
glimpse of life in this region.
ISA has also scheduled similar
evenings which will be concerned
with South and North America.
German Democracy
The prospect of democracy in
Germany will be discussed by Prof.
Pollock of the political science

'/;

department Tuesday, March 27.
Speaking by special invitation,
Prof. Pollock has recently returned
from Germany.
Switching to the more social
side," a Masquerade Party will be
offered Saturday, April 24. Theme
of the party, which will be held
from 8:30 p.m. to midnight, will
be Latin American.
Highlighting the semester's
events will be the sixth annual
International Week, schbduled
fronm Saturday, May 5 to the fol-
lowing Saturday.
The week will feature the Inter-
national Ball, a dinner, fashion
show, lecture and pageant.
Scholarships
Applications for two Delta
Delta Delta scholarships of $125
each, may be turned in to the
Dean of Women between now
and 5 p.m., Thursday, March 15.
Applicants must rurnish three
letters of recommendation. They
will be judged on scholarship,
citizenship, interest in attend-
ing college and financial need,

I-

4,ln'4Catnpue

I'

JGP-There will be a meeting of,
the Junior Girls Play ticket com-
mittee at 5 p.m. today in the
League.
There will also be a meeting of
the make-up committee at 7:15
p.m. today in the League. Inter-
ested junior coeds who are unable
to attend may contact Mary Bloe-
mendal or Sally Lyons.
* * S
RIDING GROUP-The crop and
saddle section of the Riding Club
will meet at 7 p.m. today in front
of the WAB.
** *
BALLET CLUB-Members of the
WAA Ballet Club will meet today,
with lessons scheduled for 7 p.m.
and business meeting at 8 p.m. in
Barbour Gymnasium.
* * *
ASSEMBLY CHAIRMEN-There
will be a meeting of the Assembly
Dormitory Activity chairmen at 4
p.m. tomorrow in the League.
FIGURE SKATING-The Figure
Skating Club wilf have a business
meeting for old members at 7:30
p.m. tomorrow. New members are
welcome.

Mary Tower of Kappa Kappa
Gamma was elected president of
Junior Panhellenic Association in
yesterday's Junior Panhel meeting.
Miss Tower defeated Lynette
Beall, Sue Hattendorf and Sue
Steketee, who were also nominated
from a field of 15 candidates by
the organization's interviewing
sorority pledge class had one vote
in the election.
Miss Tower's term will run until
next February and she will head
the pledges taken in next fall's
rushing. Molly Dwan, also of
Kappa Gamma, is outgoing presi-
dent of the group.
Panhel Petitioning
Sorority women may turn in
their petitions for senior Panhel-
lenic offices and sign up for inter-
views in the League Undergraduate
Office until 5:30 p.m. Monday.
Included in the petitions should;
be specific ideas for future plans.,
Positions open to Junior women,
who will be seniors in - the fall,'
include president, two vice-presi-
dents, treasurer and chairman of
rushing chairmen.
Other Posts Open
Coeds] who will be either juniors
or seniors may petition for chair-1

man of public relations and secre-
tary.
The post of chairman of rush-
ing counselors will be open to
juniors.
Other jobs which will be avail-
able, but which do not include
places on the executive council of
Panhel are chairman of interna-
tional relations, chairman of hous-
ing and chairman of i'anhel Ball.
I
Swimming Club
Will Re-organize
Re-organizational meeting of the
Speed Swimming Club will be held
at 7:15 p.m. today in the lounge
of the women's swimming pool.
Purpose of the club, according to
Betsy Alexander, manager, is "to
give coeds, who are interested in
competitive swimming, an oppor-
tunity to swim together, improve
their skills and hold meets with
other organizations during the'
semester."
Miss Alexander said that the
club is open to any interested wo-
men, regardless of the amount of
previous swimming experience.

" "' 04
. ;t:" ti
w~SI.
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t s 1*

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WAA Petitioning
Petitions for WAA Executive
Board posts must be turned in
by 5 p.m. tomorrow to Jaylee
Duke's box in the League Un-
dergraduate Office. Sheets will
be posted for coeds to sign up
for interviews.

The
yours b
American
in Europe

Vie Volk

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SPORTS FACTS
Undoubtedly one of the most dramatic moments in Michigan
basketball history was provided by a five-foot, eleven inch, bowlegged
guard known primarily for his accurate foul shooting. The boy's name
was ChuckhMurray-the some Murray who eventually was named
captain of the Wolverine hoopsters.
But January 9, 1950 in the Field House was all his, and they're
still talkirg about the dramatic, last-second basket that gave Michi-
gan an upset 69-67 thriller over the highly-touted Hoosiers.
With bbt a minute remaining the score was knotted at 67-67,
and Michigan Coach Ernie McCoy told his men to play cautiously
and wait for a close-in shot in the waning seconds.
The shot finally come and was missed by Don McIntosh, but the

A firsthand look at American
students in Europe
... how they launch new friendships in Paris cafes
... cope with the unexpected
(a coeducational dormitory in Grenoble)
....struggle to get to know Europeans
("We meet them only when we order from waiters," ,
said one girl-on-a-tour, "or ask the
femme de chambre for an extra blanket")
and have a wonderful time -
doing what they wouldn't do at hame
MLLE'S 33 pages on studying, working and
wandering abroad include the news on
summer and winter study in Europe
(with a group or on your own), tours (study or
sighlt-seeing). tra~vel by car or bike.

I ~ ~i.::.

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