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February 12, 1956 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TH-MCHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1958

'RI Report Says Atom Propulsion Feasible, Safe

Suggest Shortage
Of Labor in 1976

Nuclear propulsion of merchant
lips is both feasible and safe,
id the first commercial atom-
weredvesselishould be a' large
Lnker, University engineers have
cided.
A nuclear reactor comparable to
1e now used to propel the sub-
arine Nautilus would provide all
ie powe'r required, their research
lows, and the number of crew-
en needed should be no more
.an that employed to operate con-
ntional oil-fired ships
The engineers suggest that "for
llest utilization of the advan-

tages of nuclear propulsion, the
first ships to be so equipped should
be those which have the greatest
percentage of underway time and
which are of the largest size and
greatest power. These conditions
are best fulfilled by large tank-
ers."
These findings, the outgrowth
of studies of nuclear equipment al-
ready in operation, being planned
or in development, are outlined in
the annual report of the Univer-
sity's Engineering Research Insti-
tute, which is currently being dis-
tributed. The Institute adminis-

ters and conducts research for in- was twice that of 1953-54," Prof.
dustry, government and other off- Richard G. Folsom, director of the
campus agencies. Institute, says. "Forty-two proj-
Increase Noted ects with a dollar value of more
During 1954-55, the report points than $400,000 were carried out on
out, the Institute conducted re- such subjects as food preservation,
search valued at $8,609,755, an nuclear transportation, processing
increase of eight percent over the of nuclear fuels, and the effects of
previous year. Work was carried radiation on petroleum products."
out on 408 research projects, and A total of 1759 persons were
industry-sponsored studies jumped employed by the Institute during
37 percent, it is further noted. the year, the report adds, includ-
"Our biggest areas or growth was ing 200 faculty members on a part-
in the atomic energy field, where time basis and 900 registered full
the number of projects conducted and part-time students. The re-

mainder is made up of full-time
staff specialists.
The annual report also tells of
the role played by University soil
experts in the investigations of
foundation conditions at the site
of the Mackinac Straits Bridge.
This research resolved a ques-
tion as to the ability of the Pointe
Aux Chenes shale to support the
large piers of the bridge, for tests
showed that the, rather low-quali-
ty rock had more than ample ca-
pacity as a foundation..
Borings also were made at select-
ed locations on a line between
Mackinac City and St. Ignace, and
samples were measured for shear-
ing resistance, moisture content
and other physical properties.
Highlights Listed
Other highlights of the year de-
scribed in the report included:
WAR-GAME SIMULATION-to
provide synthetic combat experi-
ence for military officers, ERI en-
gineers developed ways to wage
mock wars on high-speed comput-
ers. Not only does the system test
the manner in which officers con-

duct battle operations, it also
shows the effects of new techniques
of warfare that have arisen since
the last war.
JET ENGINE RESEARCH-al-
loys used in the construction of
high-temperature components of
jet aircraft engines were investi-
gated for their ability to resist
thermal shocking, the phenomena
that occurs when the metal is pub-
jected to rapid and extreme
changes in temperature. Thermal
shock can cause components to
crack and fail, so researchers heat-
ed a variety of alloys up to 2000
degrees, suddenly cooled them, and
sought to evaluate the factors in-
volved.
VISION-Various studies of the
operation characteristics of the
human eye for application to prob-
lems on the visibility of military
targets are being pressed. This
research may be expected to de-
fine the distances at which our
military vehicles are safe from
enemy visual detection, and to
suggest the best times for obser-
vation of enemy targets.

By 1976, United States industry
could find itself 76 billion man-
hours short of filling production
requirements, according to the cur-
rent issue of "Better Living" mag-
azine.
In the lead article "Labor Short-
age Ahead," the Dupont employee
magazine said the United States
will have an estimated population
of 216 million with a demand for
goods and services twice what it is
today.
Figures are based on the trends
of the last 80 years, the article
stated.
"Yet the work force 20 years
hence will be only about 30 per
cent larger than it is today," the
magazine continued. "What this
means is that, at today's rate of
output, the nation woujd be able
to produce only about 70 per cent
of the goods and services demand-
ed."
Economics Professors Comment
Commendin on the article, Prof.
Harold M. Levinson and Prof. Wil-

1

S~; b etter~n
}enV
0V n9V:

than words...

a Ientines

Day I

(NC

BOOK ON EDUCATION PUBLISH ED:
Text Aims at Community Cooperation

liam Haber of the economics de-
partment agreed on its general
assumption.
But the present rate of output
obviously will not continue, Prof.
Levinson explained. "By the same
logic," he said, "if the trends of
the past 80 years continue, we
will have more output per man
hour."
Prof. Charles F. Remer of the
economics department added that
the United States will need more
capital equipment and the "skilled
labor to o with it."
On the other hand, Prof. Shorey
Peterson of the economics depart-
ment thought the article violated
a principle of economics. ,."What
is the basis of purchasing power?"
he asked. What people want de-
pends on what they can pay for,
he explained, and what they can
pay for depends on what they pro-
duce.
Technology Called Nation's Hope
The article stated that "Only by
automation and similar technolo-
gical improvements can the nation
hope to avoid this dangerous labor
shortage."
The article traced the dual rise
of technological improvements and
population, and commented:
"If the past is any guide to the
future, there is every reason to be-
lieve the nation will find ways to
fill tkhe demand of its people in
1976.
TU' Graduate
Gets $1000
Scholarsi
Dorotha Snyder '49, former
executive director of the Jackson-
Girl Scout Scholarship Commit-
tee, received a $1,000 scholarship
recently.
The scholarship, established' by
the W. T. Grant Foundation, is
part of a Girl Scout program to
help more womenprepare for the
organization's top executive posi-
tions.
Miss Snyder is completing het
work on a Master's degree at the
University of Denver in Coloradok
During the 1955-56 academic
year 16 women will be working on
graduate programs through Curt
Scout scholarships. Executives cur-
rently employed by the QIrl Scouts
are eligible as are "promising
young women."

1.i

Assorted Chocolates -
a tempting variety of the finest milk
chocolates, and dark chocolates with creams,
nuts, crisp and chewy centers.
b. box 2 . box
You won't have to tell her - she'll know,
when you give her Russell Stover candies.
Because they are the finest you can buy,
they say more than words!-

CA N D 1 E S
Valentine "Hearf"
tempting assorted chocolates, In a beautiful
red foil heart-shaped box.
1 lb. HEARTl
Other Heart Boxes 80c to $7.50
CH ESTER ROBERTS
312 South State

Prof. C. Wenrich, chairman of tional Education and Practical
the department of vocational'edu- Arts in the Community School."
cation and practical arts is co- Prof. Wenrich says the aim of
author of a book entitled "Voca- the book is to help local adminis-
STUDENT HEADQUARTERS
FOR YARNS
AND
KSUT TK I GS UP L HE
/MANY DIFFERENT
TYPES OF YARNS
!@ A LARGE SELECTION OF
SWEATER AND SOCK PAKS.
Yarncraft Shop
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE
Phone NO. 2-0303 10 Nickels Arcade

trators, meners of boards of edu-
cation, teachers, and the people of
the community 1) to increase the
availability and effectiveness of
bhose aspects of the school program
designed to develop vocational
competencies and 2) to enrich the
general education of hildren,
youth, and adults. '
The book is based on the premise
that effective school programs
must be developed cooperatively
by the people in the school and
community. Co-author with Prof.
Wenrich is Prof. Harold M. By-
ram, professor of Agricultural Edu-
cation at Michigan State Univer-
sity.
Some of the unique features of
the book are:
1) an extended treatment of the
practical arts;
2) an interpretation of the roll
of the elementary schoolin this
area;
3) descriptions of cooperative
occupational training and other
work-experience programs;
4), discussion of the use of citi-
scommitteesfor vocational
education;
5) consideration of facilities'
needed for these programs;
6)the nat'ure of the task of in-
terpretation of vocational educa-
tion and the practical arts.

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