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February 28, 1956 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1956-02-28

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1956

THE MCBIGAN DAMY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1956 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Labor Youth League Motion
Heard By Federal Court

Architectural Survey Tells 'Inside Story'

A motion to allow presentationl
of an amicus curiae brief in the
case of Labor Youth League v.
Subversive Activities Control Board
was presented to the Federal Dis-
trict Court of Appeals Saturday
in Washington, D.C.
The amicus curiae (friend of
the court) brief challenges the
constitutionality of the McCarran
Internal Security Act of 1950.
It was prepared by a group of
student leaders at the University
of Wisconsin under the leadership
of Allan Blumstein, president of
the Young Democrats there.
A statement prepared by the
group challenges the Act's consti-
tutionality on the basis of its "im-
Foreign Stud
Plans Listed
Details on the Fulbright pro-
gram for study abroad have been
published in a recent News Bulle-
tin issued by the Institute of In-
ternatio al Education.
The flbright act, as part of
the international educational ex-
change activities of the U.S. State
Department, authorizes the sale
of surplus property abroad to make
it possible for American students
to study abroad.
The grants provide funds for
students, 'teachers, professors, and
lecturers to go to foreign lands
and pays travel expenses for for-
eign students coming to the United
States.
The purpose of the Fulbright
program is not to help bright stu-
dents get Ph.D.'s, but to send rep-
resentative Americans who are
capable of profiting by it to a
foreign university, Dr. Catherin
Sims of the national selection com-
mittee for graduate students noted.
The Institute of International
Education also disclosed recently
that two fellowships for graduate
study in Iran are being offered by
the ,University of Tehran. Candi-
dates are required to have a work-
ing knowledge of the Persian
language. -

pact on the vast majority of Ameri-
can youth who are not members
of the Labor Youth League, who
may disagree with its policies, or
who may never even have heard of
the' LYL."
LYL is appealing a decision of
the Subversive Activities Control
Board (SACB) that the League
nust register with the attorney-
general as a Communist-front or-
ganization under the provisions of
the McCarran Act.
The case is presently on the
court's docket, and a decision is
expected this spring.
LYL officials have indicated they
will take their case all the way to
the Supreme Court if necessary.
The SACB conducted hearings
from November, 1953, to April,
1954, before deciding the League
was a Communist-front organiza-
tion.
The League also challenges the
constitutionality of the McCarran
Act, claiming the Act is the real
"clear and present danger to the
Constitution and Bill of Rights of
the United States."
Leon Wofsy, national LYL chair-
man, testified before the SACB
that the League opposed the act
on the grounds that it created an
atmosphere of fear in institutions
of learning and stifled the expres-
sion of young people, pointing to
the LYL's hearing before the
SACB as a case in point.
LYL witnesses claimed further
that the Act contained a built-in
conviction or outlawing power, in
that it deprived groups of their
freedom merely by designating
them as Communist-front organi-
zation and without due process of
law, even though the Communist
Party itself has not been outlawed.
The amicus curiae brief ques-
tioned the constitutionality of the
Act "because it limits the rights of
students to freely associate and
freely discuss any controversial is-
sue of the day." It adds that stu-
dents or student organizations
might be summoned before the
Security Board under the present
Act for favoring desegregation.

The "inside story" on the ar-
chitectural profession was recent-
ly released by the Columbia Uni-
versity School of Architecture and
the Architectural Forum magazine.
This report is a survey titled "A
Report on Registered Architects
in the United States, 1955" is con-
cerned with the 22,000 registered
architects in the country.
Although the survey is made up
of many statistics, this first com-
prehensive study of the architec-
tural profession gives a picture of
the architect at work, where. he
works, and what projects he is
working on.
When the statistics were com-
piled, the report revealed that
nearly 20 percent of all registered
architects were graduated from
four colleges, one of which is the,
University of Michigan's College
of Architecture and Design.
The other three colleges are the
University of Illinois, the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania, and Colum-
bia University. The statistics also
showed that more than half of
the architects graduated from
these schools after 1930.
Another fact revealed by the
report was that two out of every
five architects work as heads of
their own independent firms and
only slightly more are in partner-
ships or affiliated with other larger
firms.
The survey was tabulated under
the direction of Dean Leopold Ar-
naud of the Columbia architec-
tural faculty and Oscar N. Ser-
bein Jr., Professor of Statistics
at Columbia's graduate School of
Business.
Both of these men sent out ques-

tionnaires to the registered archi- Serbein concluded that, "It does
tects. About 10,000 questionnaires not stretch credibility too far to
were returned. believe that the findings'from this
Although the tabulations were group are, to a substantial extent,
made with only one half of the applicable to all registered archi-
architects' questionnaires, Prof. tects in the United States."
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-Daily-vern Soden
AUTOMOBILE TRANSMISSIONS-Shown above is a display of General Motors' 8 and 6-cylinder
overdrive and synchromesh transmissions. Saturday's display was part of a University-sponsored in-
struction program for public school teachers of auto-mechanics. The program, designed to introduce
new features in automobile transmissions, included displays, demonstrations and lectures by repre-
sentatives of Ford, Chrysler, and General Motors. Held in the Mason Hall lobby and first floor
classrooms, the program, termed an "institute," was the third of the 1955-56 season.
NEIGHBORHOODS, COMMUNITIES:
Whittemore Active in City Planning
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By JIM BOW
Cities as well as buildings are
frequent subjects of exhibits in
the College of Architecture and
Design.
One of the men responsible for
this is Prof. Harlow O. Whitte-
more, Professor of Landscape Ar-
chitecture.
Prof. Whittemore has worked
with city planning ever since the
program was instigated at the
University in 1913. Whentasked
how long he had worked in the
field, Prof. Whittemore was quick
to add that his interest in city
planning had developed in his
boyhood years..
In further conversation, Prof.
Whittenore brought out several as-
pects of the field of city planning
both at the University and in the
nation.
Prof. Whittemore stressed the
need for city planners. "The de-
partment receives calls for plan-j
ners almost every day," he explain-
ed, adding that graduates have
opportunity to work either for
municipal governments or for
private planning firms.
One of the problems discussed
by Prof. Whittemore is graphi-
cally illustrated by one student,
who began his career' in Los Ange-
les. The young city planner wrote
Prof. Whittemore that one of his
biggest problems was the popula-

tion increase of 2600 a day in
Los Angeles County.
To help solve these problems, a
city is divided into segments. The
ideal unit or segment is the neigh-
borhood, perhaps a square mile
area consisting of a school, church,
playground, and 'shopping center.
The next largest unit is the com-
munity, a group of eight or ten
neighborhoods with a major shop-
ping center, a high school, and in-
dustries.
Another problem of city plan-
ning is illustrated by Prof. Whit-
temore's words, "It's either go up
or go out." Factories, apartment
houses, and schools are requiring
more space for their structures,
which are themselves more spread
out. Thus, cities are spreading out'

creating problems of distance in
travel.
Prof. Whittemore summed up
the problems of city planning in
these words, "Cities are built by
men, and if they can build them
they should be able to plan and
control them."

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HOW TO CONQUER FRUSTRATION. When blocked
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BEST ADVICE I EVER HAD. A street-corner phrenolo-
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GUIDED MISSILES: KEY TO PEACE?Terrifying weap-
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HOW MUCH DEBT CAN YOU AFFORD? Worried over
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HOW YOUR NOSE KNOWS. Scientific facts about our
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AMERICAN MEN ARE LOUSY FATHERS. Famed au-
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THE MAN WHO SAVED A PRESIDENT. The impeach-
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WHY DO DOCTORS SMOKE? A doctor asks, "How
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knowing its harmful effects?"
COLLEGE WITH A BUILT-IN POCKETBOOK. Story of
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