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February 26, 1956 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-26
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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THE MICHIGAN 'DILY

Paae Eiaht

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, February 2.6, 1956

Pleasure-Loving Miami

DAIQURIS & TROPICAL FISH

(Continued from Page* '
of July and the latest De Mille
epic. Not even in his wildest
dreams could the most talented of
the Cinemascope set designers
have given birth to this monstr-
ous cancer that is a final, damn-
ingl testmn t hepleasure-iseek-f
afemel afeter h otifte motel.

'The hotels are palaces, and the
motels are second-rate if they
don't have more than one swim-
ming pool and a golf course. Each
neon sign is bigger and flashier
than the next and they glare with
dizzying persistence.
The interior of these 'tourist
th t eri rs A he ab ul u
FLouifcs, thalbb resebles
epttat litl isa sorwe thtr
paaal ltloea o hrty doras

M IAMI In the winter Is for the
rich man or the spendthrift.
But Miami in the summer provides
the same facilities at greatly re-
duced prices that make it within
the reach of almost anyone who
can afford to take a vacation;
and temperatures are usually lower
'than those in other U.S. metro-
Thse wo knohth cubityel
not asll to ur thtity has itsei-
touittra and the fashy
And it wants to be.

Sporting look
from
State & Liberty -
Seen in o ur turi g I'..*
Ne SA CONY

By JANE HOWARD
TRAVEL GUIDES on Cuba rhap-
sodize about H2,vana's grandi-
ose palm-lined boulevards, twisting
world's gaes hand costlest niht
spots
Cued in by one ardent Cuban-
by-adoption, Ernest Hemingway,
the ook be th viao nto
nantrofte Saisthe colonalera.nd
Theyubastoh ht ad
agoTand evna of humid Caag-
southern Cubans agree that
commercialization would rob their
domain, of its unique- appeal. If
they want occasional proof of
President Batista's noble inten-
tions, they can fly in a couple of
hours to Havana, where some cam-
paign promises have been fulfilled.
But southern Cuba has unher-
alded attractions of its own. Some
bf it is picturesque, but not so
pretty--the naked children playing
in the filth of the unpaved streets,
and an economic status making
senoras glad to get jobs as maids
for "nearly nothing" per month.
However, the area has features no
other section can duplicate.
From the United States Naval
Base at Guantanamo Bay, an oasis
of stateside routine and custom,
the tourist can sidestrip his way
to any number of places the travel
books forget,
He can drive over thirty miles
of rough and sometimes nonexist-
ent roads to Guantanamo or "Git-
mo City," as local jargon has ab-
breviated it.
IN "Gitmo City," the tourist can1
provide business for the customs
offices in dark shops where alli-
gator and mahogany goods tempt
his pocketbook. He can eat lon-
gusta and other seafoods he's never
heard of before, in restaurants
specializing in the exotic.
He can sip memorable frozen
daiquiris in sidewalk cafes, accept-.
ing the commnon Cuban maxim that
rum is cheaper than water. Cer--
tainly it's more popular.
If his Spanish is limited to
"hasta Ia vista"-whlch is some-
thing of a handicap--he can play
charades with liquid-eyed shop-
keepers until they understand that
he's interested in their perfumes,
liquors, cigars.
He must make clear to them, too,
that he's not intrigued by the
shops' pride: racks of drab dresses
and suits said to represent "latest
styles" in stateside wear. ,

THE PROBLEM of transporta-
tion In and around Gitmo City
can be solved-colorfully. There are
rickety cabs, rivalling their Pari-
sian counterparts for reckless
speed. More picturesque wagons,
drawn by ancient burros barely
able to walk, attract other patrons.
And there are awkward straws
covere as o ft e t ris , hg -
gin astalt flantsad herd ofy
anaoHers Jt ad fromi
work. ,eseial b aios
Fordstherpedestran th aerae
the unsicieoere of littl eu
dEgl i an who arue moesthan
willo tmraiisitor. in the hop-
ofansray coin osed sthrs wary
leads across theiba og Cimesa,u
whoe veso mote uior ague
scorching sun retire, electricity
blazes.
The Naval Base itself, a sprawl-
ing and orderly community mark-
ed of f by radio towers and piers
named alphabetically, offers its
attractions. In a song he calls
"Calypso Gitmo" one naval officer
has immortalized the life there
with the line "it's the only base
in the whole darn fleet--where
inspections are held to a mambo
beat."
THE VISITOR can see the song's
point. Dances, almost daily
crowding the base's packed social
schedule, make good use of native
bands adept at the cha-cha-cha
routines. This, under fabled palms
and fantastically full moons,
makes for evenings nobody on
Guantanamo can forget,
For a change of pace Guanta-
namo people can pack up a lunch
and spend a day a few miles over
he purple mountains on the Carib-
bean beach. By holding their noses
and diving under they find that
the water's incredible royal blue
is only half the sea's color scheme:
Beneath the surface are schools
of wierdly-colored tropical fish,
fearlessly brushing by swimmer's
feet.
This doesn't annoy even the
squeamish, because Caribbean
swimming calls for shoes as pro.
tection against jagged and Un-
expected coral reefs.
That's not all. There are the
birds, leading inquisitive minds to
ornithology books. There are the
wild fuchsia zhrubs of bougain-
villea, starkly contrasted against
the blue of sky and water. And
there is the unmistakable attitude
of "manana."

The People---
The Fce of
A PHTOGRAPHER' VIEW

NUNS QN BEDLOE'S ISLAND, NEW I

11

Sports Shop
tower level

Playcloth-es and swimsuits
in unforgettable painters'
COlors.

SERVANT (*IRLDALEXANDR1A

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AND
NORTHERN EUROPE
Departure July 30, 1956 . . . 58 days
Killarney, Cork, Dublin, Belfast, Turnberry, Burns
country, the Trossachs, Edinburgh, Bergen, M.S.
"Meteor" cruise to Hardongerfjord, Oslo, Visby,
Stockholm Helsinki, Len'"g'ad' Moscow Baltic
Sea, Copenhagen, Hamburg, London, Deauville,
Bciyeox, Mont St. Michel, Dinard, Morloix, Quimper,
Vonnes, Angers, Tours of the chateau country, Paris.
Arrive New York September 25, 1956
T RAVEL BUREAU INC.
1313 S. University NO 2-5587

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