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February 26, 1956 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-26

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 26, ISM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1958

lation' s Thirst for Steel Unquenched
34.0
en"
3.16
I (
3 G
1 -9
STEEL'S TOTAL PAYROLL
(IN BILLIONS) -
NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES Q.
(IN THOUSANDS)--'
8 U.S. STEELMAKING
$9 - ,.*......CAPACITY BY STATES
LIONS OF INGOT TONS
$r.9 ~PROPORTION OF TOTAL.
5 4WAR I
.STATES WITH PRODUCTION
* 940 1947 1Q55 CAPACITIES L ESS TH AN 1.5
.)MILLiON INGOT TONS
RISE IN WAGES AND SALARIES 289% STATES WITH NO PRO-
RISE IN NUMBER OF EMPLOYEE:S 33% U.Et-LAv A' D ees DUCTION CAPACITIES

1,500,000 WATCH EVERY WEEK:
'U-TV' Succeeds Without Campus Transmitter

V

(Continued from Page 1)
allocation is necessary. Prof. Gar-
rison comments, "It would seem
best to wait until this situation is
cleared up. When the only insti-
tution in the state with UHF ex-
perience is trying to get out ... "
But, when things are settled, the
Television office is ready to move
ahead.
If the University does establish
its own TV station, be it months
or years from now, what kind of
programs would the station offer?
Outline of Programs
Prof. Garrison has presented the
Daily with his outline of several
types of programs designed to meet,
special interests.
1. General adult education and
information.
"A hunger to know is quite
universal. The different interests
and needs of housewives, business
men and women, laborers, clerks
and secretaries, farmers and city
folk and many others can be serv-
ed effectively and easily via tele-
courses on a variety of subjects
from wood-working to literature.
A better informed adult citizenry
is a 'must' for effective democratic
society. A non-commercial station
permits discussion of important
public issues on the local, state anc
national level in prime evening
time.
Specialists would be available as
guests on news programs for first
hand authoritative comments. In-
terests of the general audience also
embrace sports and special ex-
hibits. Such activities at the Uni-
versity may be presented via film
and on-the-spot pick-ups."
2. Out-of-school viewing for
children of school age and daytime
viewing by pre-school children.
"Here is an area which 'in com-
mercial television programming is
a, subject of great criticism. Parents
and children would have more
choice of programs with a non-
commercial University stations
Series would be designed-to answer
the criticism directed aginst some
current program practices.
Athletic instruction by Univer-
sity coaches and top campus ath-
letes would have high interest
value for teen age boys and girls,
for example, in addition to being
imaginative and interesting, should
attract sizeable audiences."
3. General Programming.
"Many programs would be de-
signed to enrich the lives of the
people, suchmas various series in
fine ,arts, music, literature and
drama. Programs which are of the
entertainment type will be utilized
also as an outlet for students en-
gaged in taking television or allied
courses, such as music and speech.
Experimentation in programming
techniques will be encouraged."
4. Programs designed for class-
room reception.
"This parallels roughly the cur-

rent widespread -use of radio pro-
grams in the classroom. As supple-
mental aids, the resources of a
able to the teacher in the Gloss-
great University will be made
available to the teacher in a class-
room. Imagine the stimulation for
a class in general science in a
rural school when a telecast from
the Naval Tank deals with scien-
tific work in ship design or when
the working of the cyclotron in
nuclear physics research is ex-
plained by one of the nation's
leading physicists.
Students in civics would eaves-
drop on important discussions by
world figures as they visit the
campus. Specialized series in art,
music, language, vocational guid-
ance, etc., could be planned for
integration into the curricula of
t1 , scaools."
5. Post-professional or in-serv-
ice information and instruction.
"This type of program would
bring to graduates of professional
schools information on the latest
developments in the respective
fields. The schools of Business Ad-
ministration and Pharmacy, for
example, could offer television
counterparts of their interesting
community service programs.
The School of Dentistry and the
Engineering College, and others,
could have a continuing series on
recent developments in those pro-
fessions. Papers on medical re-
search might be presented to a
number of county medical society
meetings at the same time. These
are only illustrative of this im-,
portant area."

6. Direct adult education.
"This area could be another
branch of the Extension Service's
excellent correspondence ' work.
Students who are not able to at-
tend Extension Center classes be-
cause of distance a-.d work sched-
ules, might be permitted to enroll
in regular University Extension
courses by television and receive
credit when successfully passing
supervised examinations. The spe-
cific details would need to be care-
fully worked out in order to insure
that such courses are in accord-
ance with regular University aca-
demic procedures.
7. Continuing Public Relations.
"Educators have an excellent op-
portunity to schedule programs to
aid the taxpayers and parents in
understanding the varied aspects
of instruction, research and serv-
ice.
Television permits personal tours
to classes and laboratories in op-

eration and first-hand reports on
aims and purposes of the educa-
tional system. The TV spotlight
may stimulate interest, provoke
discussion, and permit applause of
constructive criticism for particu-
lar philosophies and methods uti-
lized. The public has an oppor-
tunity to judge for itself."
Aware of Dangers
Prof. Garrison is fully aware of
the dangers involved in such a
staggering operation. "The quick-
est way to kill educational tele-
vision," he warns, "is to have ama-
teurish direction and amateurish
talent." The past five years have
pretty well erased that threat from
the campus. Whenever they come,
workable plans and an appropriate
subsidy will be met with talent,
resources, and experience.
One thing is certain. With or
without a television station, the
University will continue to reach
into thousands of homes, where
opportunity is virtually boundless.

A

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The FINEST in
r Meals and Snacks
1204 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
10:30 A.M. to 11 P.M. Closed Saturdays

0"

i

By DAVID L. BOWEN
Issoclated Press Newsfeatures Writer
The United States steel indus-
y, finding the economy's thirst
r steel still unsatisfied despite
cord-breaking expansion since
Ze end of World War II, this
eek announced plans for boosting
ill further America's capacity to
oduce the basic ingredient of
rosperity.
Benjamin F. Fairless, former
esident and chairman of the
oard of United States Steel Co.
id now president of the Ameri-
in Iron and Steel Institute, an-
>unced in New York that within
Le next three years the industry
:pects to raise its annual steel-
aking capacity by 15 million net
ns. This would provide an an-
ual total United States capacity
more than 143 million net tons.
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"The need for this great ex-
pansion," Fairless said, "is ap-
parent in the rapidly growing pop-
ulation of our country, in the ris-
ing standards of living and in the
generally expanding economy."
During the past year, production
capacity in the United States was
increased by 2.6 million tons.
Already the United States is by
far the biggest producer of steel
in the world. American capacity of
128.4 million net tons of ingots at
the end of 1955 dwarfs the esti-

mated 49.6 million tons of steel-
making capacity in the Soviet Un-
ion. The United States possesses
4 per cent of all the steel produc-
tion capacity in the entire world.
The accompanying map shows
the impressive expansion of steelj
production capacity in the United
States since the end of World War
IL Fourteen states now have ca-
pacities in excess of 1.5 million
net tons. Another 13 states pro-
duce some steel, but in amounts
less than 1.5 million tons.j

Petitioning Begins For SGC,
Four. Other Campus Boards

Among the eight leading steel
producing states (Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan,
New York, Maryland and Ala-
bama), Michigan has added the
greatest percentage of capacity in
the nine postwar years.
Michigan jumped from eighth
place among the leaders with an-
nual capacity of 3,275,420 ingot
tons in 1946 to fifth place in 1955
with an annual capacity of 6,-
783,000-a rise of more than 107
per cent.
In this same group of states,
Maryland's percentage capacity in-
crease was next highest 51.8. per
cent, followed by New York with
48.2 per cent, Indiana with 38.3
per cent, Alabama with 36.7 per
cent, Ohio with 31.8 per cent, Il-
linois with 27.4 per cent, and
Pennsylvania with 26.6 per cent.
Laporte Praised
Physics Prof. Otto Laporte has
been commended by the United
States State Department for his
work in advancing U.S.-Japanese
relations.
Prof. Laporte, who became a
science attache at the U.S. em-
bassy in Japan in September of
1954, played a part in securing an
agreement with Japan on civil
uses of atmoic energy.

We have many new dress and sweater
packs in new yarns just brought out
by the companies
COME IN AND SEE THEM
YARNCRAFT SHOP
Phone NO 2-0303 10 Nickels Arcade

- -

Student Government Council
hopefuls and potential candidates
for,positions in four other campus
boards are now able to pick up
petitions.
Council positions, which will be
distributed according to highest
votes in the. end-of-March elec-
tions, include six full-year terms
and one semester teri.
In addition to SGC candidate
petitions, there are applications
for seven positions on she Union
Board of Directors, nine openings
for sophomores on the J-Hop com-
mittee, three vacancies on the
Board in Control of Student Pub-

'{

lications, and one spot for a soph-
omore on the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate, Athletics.
Five of the seven Union Board'
positions are open to all male stu-
dents, while the other two are re-
served one each for students in
Law School and medicine or den-
tistry,
Petitions for all offices in the
coming all-campus elections may
be picked up at the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, 1020 Administration
Bldg. from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
All petitions must be returned to
OSA by 5 p.m., March 7.

for the studying room, the living room,
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Wrought Iron Utility .Desk

Our Complete Staff is now ready
to serve you again this semester

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ENGINEERS,

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SCIENTISTS,
P H YSICISTS,
PPLIED
MATHEMATICIAN S
important on-a mm pus
interviews soon!
North American Representatives
Will Be Here Mar. 1, 2
You'll learn first hand about the advantages
and opportunities in choosing a career with
a future at North American. Here engineers
and scientists are now discovering new
frontiers in four exciting new fields.
AUTONETICS
A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
In the field of ELECTRO-MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-producing new
missile guidance systems, fire and flight control systems, computers

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ybk It's good news for University stu-

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A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
In the field of ROCKET PROPULSION-the largest producer of large liquid-
propellant rocket engines, more powerful propellants and turbines.
ATOMICS INTERNATIONAL
A Division of North American Aviation, Inc.
Peaceful application of ATOMIC ENERGY in any phase of reactor devel-
opment, either for research or power production.
MISSILE DEVELOPMENT ENGINEERING
Engineering and developing Long-Range MISSILES-Intercontinental

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