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February 12, 1956 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1956-02-12

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T1111E MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1956

THE MICHIGAN DAILY SU~JDAY, FEBI~UARY 11,11956

Jnion Opera
)irectors
aloose Men
Members of the 1956 Union Op-
'a Executive Committee were ap-
oved Thursday by the Opera
ommittee of the Union Board of
irectors.
They are: General Chairman
on Medalie, '56 BAd, General
ecretary Thomas Cleveland, '57,
oad Show Chairman Jim Bar-
r, '57,i. Programs Chairman
,eve Koplin, '57, Production
hairman John Moore, '57E, Mu-
: Chairman Frank Knox, '57, and
:omotions Chairman Tom Oates,
7E.
Tryouts for positions on the
mmittees will be held later in
e spring. Those interested in
mmittee positions may contact
e chairmen immediately.
There will be an "authors'
eeting" at 3:30 p.m. Thursday
Room 3-G of the Union. for
ose interested in writing a ten-
-15 minute skit for the 1956
pera.

$687,591.45 TOTAL:
Gifts, Grants Accepted By Regents

EARTH SATELLITES:
'U' Engineers Propose
New Measuring Devices

The Board of Regents accepted
gifts and grants of $687,591.45 at
their meeting Friday.
Largest grant was $156,450 from
the- National Foundation for In-
fantile Paralysis to be paid over
a period of five years and an ex-
pediting grant of $117,615 to be
used during 1956.
For the Virology Laboratory
Fund, the grant will be used under
the direction of Dr. Thomas Fran-
cis, Jr. to continue the study of
drugs for the prevention or treat-
ment of polio.
Regents accepted five grants
totalling $85,200 from the Nation-
al Science Foundation of Wash-
ington. D.C.
Fron the National Fund for
Medical Education, New York, the
Regents accepted $54,118.29 for
use by the Medical School.
The Rockefeller Foundation has
made a grant of $39,000 to enable
the Survey Research Center to
'study voting behavior in the 1956
elections.
A Class A Common Stock Cer-
tificate in the Christjane Corpora-
tion valued at $18,005.13 was giv-_

en by John C. Thom, New York,
for the Henry E. Riggs Scholar-
ship fund.
Survey Research Center has re-
ceived a grant of $16,675 from the
Foundation for Research on Hum-
an Behavior, Ann Arbor, .for a
one year study of the "motiva-
tional and social-psychological fac-
tors in scientific performance."
The final payment from the es-
tate of Walter R. Parker, Detroit,
Nuclear Power
Feasible, Safe'
University engineers have found
that nuclear propulsion of merch-
ant ships is both feasible and safe.
These engineers also recommend
that the first commercial atom-
powered vessel should be a large
tanker.
Their research. also shows that
one nuclear reactor comparable to
that now used to propel the sub-
marine Nautilus would provide all
the power required.

Come to Church
Today.

of $16,000 was accepted by the
Regents for the Margaret Watson
Parker Art Collection. The col-
lection, now housed in the Museum
of Art, consists of 679 items and
is valued at more than $120,000.
To support a five year study in
cardiovascular research in the
field of thoracic surgery, the D.
and R. fund of Chicago has made
a grant of $10,000.
In addition to the monetary
gifts and grants, several not in the
form of money were accepted by
the Regents.
The Clements Library received
a rare pamphlet, dated 1788, from
Dr. Lawrence Reynolds, Detroit.
The pamphlet, "The Biographical
History of Dionysius, Tyrant of
Delaware," was written anony-
mously by Dr. James Tilton and is
a bitter political attack on George
Read of Delaware for his alleged
toryianism durhig the Revout3n*.
The Museum of Art received
several gifts. A collection of five
Japanese paintings, valued at
$10,000, was given by Mr. and Mrs.
Province Henry, San Francisco.
The Museum also received two3
paintings from Mr. and Mrs. Har-
ry L. Winston, Birmingham.
New Posi tions
Given Hubbell,
Davenport.
Dr. Horace W. Davenport was;
appointed professor of physiology
and chairman of the Department
of Physiology in the Medical
School by the Board of Regents
Friday.
He has been professor and head
of the Department of Physiology
at the University of Utah College
of Medicine since 1945.
Prof. Theodore H. Hubbell,
curator of insects in the Museum
of Zoology, was appointed' direc-
tor of the Museum of Zoology, ef-
fective Feb. 12.
Prof. Hubbell has been at the
University since 1947. His ap-
pointment will fill the vacancy
left by the death last May of Prof.'
J.. Speed Rogers.

FOREIGN HANDICRAFTS -- A sample of the "exotic, unusual"
manufactures that will be on sale during World University
Service's fund-raising Treasure Van, to be held February 23 to 25.
'TreasureVan To Head
W US Funds Campaign

$y VERNON NAHRGANG
World University Service is
making final preparations for its
coming fund drive and Treasure
Van, both to be held next week.
Letters have been prepared by
the local committee and are being
mailed to all faculty members and
their wives, inviting them to at-
tend the opening of the Treasure
Van, February 23.,
Thousands of dollars worth of
handicrafts and manufactures are
being imported for exhibit and
sale during the three days of the
Treasure Van.
Van to Sell Jewelry, Shoes
Jewelry, bells, shoes, bookends
and dolls are among the many
valuable foreign imports being
sold at prices of 75 cents to $25.
Everyone is invited to visit the
Hussey Room of the League dur-
ing the three . sale days of the
Treasure Van, February 23-25.
All profits made from sales will
go to World University Service
member countries to "Help stu-
dents help themselves."
WUS to Conduct Bucket Drive
During the first two days of
the Treasure Van sales, WUS will
be conducting its "Bucket" Drive
-without buckets. Sixteen cam-

pus locations will have collection
stations.
Plans so far will have various
houses manning the "buckets" for
short pe'riods, with results and
amounts collected by each group
being tabulated.
In addition to the "Bucket"
Drive and the Treasure Van, stu-
dents will have other ways of
contributing to WUS's program of
aid to students all over the world.
Students Can Donate Blood
"They can also give by blood
pledges," Anne Woodard, '57, co-
chairman of WUS said. "Students
can go to the University Hospital
and donate a pint of blood. The
hospital sends WUS a $15 dona-
tion for the blood."
WUS groups throughout the
country will be watching the suc-
cess of the local Treasure Van,
which is being tried in this coun-
try for the first time although it
has met with great success in
Canada.
Only students and faculty mem-
bers of the University are asked
to contribute to WUS. The dona-
tions will be sent to students and
faculty members in foreign coun-
tries who are only partly able to
support themselves.

Three proposals for measuring-
instruments in the launching of
earth satellites have been made by
University engineers for the In-
ternational Geophysical Y e a r,
1957-58.
Suggestions entailed a unit for
measuring pressure and composi-
tion of the upper atmosphere by
various ionization gauges, an in-
strument for measuring electron
density, and a complete satellite
that would measure the total den-
sity of the atmosphere at alti-
tudes between 200 and 250 miles.
The latter is expected to be ac-
complished by placing a sensitive
accelerometer in afive-foot-dia-
meter sphere weighing five pounds.
The drag of the air on the satel-
lite would be detected by. the in-
ternal device and radioed to the
ground. The drag would remain
in its orbit for days or even weeks,
said the engineers, even though it
is measurable.
Engineers Offer Suggestions
Leslie M. Jones, University re-
search engineer of the Engineer-
ing Research Institute, Professor
Gunnar Hok of the engineering
department, and Henry S. Sicinski,
associate research physicist with
the Engin'eering -Research Insti-
tute, participated in a two-day
meeting of the Upper Atmosphere
Rocket Research Panel at the Uni-
versity last month in which 40
suggestions for measuring-instru-
ments were made.
Prof. Hok described the instru-
ment for measuring electron den-
sity while Jones described the
satellite which would be used for
measuring the total density of the
atmosphere.
Sicinski told the gathered scien-
tists about an instrument designed
to measure pressure and composi-
tion of the upper atmosphere.
No decision has been reached by
Organization
Notices
Michigan Union : Meeting for pros-
pective try-outs, Feb. 15, 4:15 p.m. in
Rooms 3 L,- M, and N, and 7:15 p.m. in
Room" 3b, Union.
* * *
Union Opera: All persons interested
in writing short skits for 1956 Union
opera, please attend the meeting on
Feb. 16, Rm. 3G, Union, 3:30 p.m.
Unitarian Student Group: Orienta-
tion dinner at 6:00 p.m. tonight, New-
comers welcome, no admission, Dr.
William Hammond will speak on "Uni-
tarianism" at 7:00 p.m., 1st Unitarian
Church, 1917 Washtenaw.
* * . -
SRA: Lane Hall Folk Dancers, under
the direction of Jud McGehee, will re-
sume meeting for the second semester,
Feb. 13, 7:30-10:00 p.m. in the recrea-
tion room. Instruction for every dance.
Beginners welcome.

officials of the U.S. International
Geophysical Year concerning what
specific instruments to include in
the satellites.
Suggestions In Test Series
University officials said, how-
ever, that suggestions made by the
engineers would likely be included
in the first test series when the
satellites are launched by rocket
from Patrick Air Base, Fla.
Dr.'Joseph Kaplan, chairman of
the U.S. IGY complimented the
University, saying it nad done an
"outstanding job in paving the
way for launching earth satellites.
He singled out the University's
research on space flight problems
in connection with Army Signal
Corp and Air Force contracts and
added, "The University has done
an outstanding job in rocket re-
search, on the type that provided
a basis for our satellite program."
Five Holmes
Films Listed
For Semester
A series of five Burton Holmes"
travelogues, sponsored by the Uni-
versity Oratorical Association,
will be presented at 8:30 p.m. Veb.
16, 23, March 8, 15 and 22 in
Hill Auditorium.
Holmes, the foremost exponent
of the travelogue, has been a.
leader in his field for more than
three decades. Thayer Soule and
Robert Mallett, Holmes' associates,
will narrate the films.
Soule will narrate "Cairo to
Baghdad" Thur'sday. The film
deals with the Middle East, cov-
ering the Nile, the Pyramids, the
Dead Sea and Damascus.
"The Caribbean," covering trop-
ical lands along the Spanish Main,
will be the second offering Feb
23. Highlights of the picture,
which Soule will narrate, are Car-
acas, Trinidad, Jamaica, Haiti and
the Virgin Islands.
March 8 "The Grand Tour of
Europe" will be presented. With
Mallett narrating, the film is a
tour of London, Belgium, Holland,
Germany, France and Italy.
Soule will narrate "Switzerland"
March 15. The picture will feat-
ure visits to St. Moritz, Interlak-
en, Lucerne, Rhone Glacier and
the Jungfrau.
The final offering will be
"California" March 22. Narrated
by Mallett, it will include a tour
of the Redwood country, Death
Valley, San Francisco, Los Ange-
les and the Pacific coast line.
Tickets for the series as well as
for individual shows are now o1
sale at the boxoffice.

d

i

MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets.
Rev. Russell Fuller, Minister
10:45 Morning Worship, Sermon: "What Color
is God?"
9:45 A.M.-Church School.
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
6:30 P.M.-Informal supper at the Guild House,
welcoming new students.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Masses Daily at 7:00 A.M., 8:00 A.M., 9:00
A.M.
Sundays at 8:00 A.M., 9:30 A.M., 11:00 A.M.,
12 noon.
Novena Devotions, Wednesday Evenings - 7:30
P.M.
Newman Club Rooms in the Father Richard Cen-
ter.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:45 A.M. Friends Meeting.
10:45 A.M. Sunday School.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erlanid J, Wangdahl, Eugene
A. Ransom, Ministers.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship, "If Ch'ristians
were Christians." Dr. Abbey preaching.
7:30 P.M.-Open House, Welcome to New Stu-
dents. Games, refreshments. Wesley Lounge.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, open daily.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division Street
Services:
8 o'clock and 9 o'clock Holy Communion at St.
Andrew's Church (Breakfast at Canterbury
House following the 9 o'clock)
11 o'clock-Morning prayer and sermon.
8 P.M.-Evening prayer and commentary.
5:30 P.M.-Buffet supper at Canterbury House.
7 P.M. to 10:30 P.M.-Informal open house at
Conterbury House.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Avenue,
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Sunday 11 A.M.
Feb. 12, Lesson Topic, "Soul."
Wednesday 8 P.M.
Sunday School 9:30 A.M,
Reading Room, 339 South Main. Tuesday to Sat-
urday 11 A.M. to 5 P.M., Monday 11 A.M. to
9 P.M., Sunday 2:30 to 4:30
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister.
10 AM. Unitarian Adult Group panel: Dr. David
Nonney, Dr. B. K. Bagchi, and Dr. Richard
Hicks: "The Philosophy of Science."
11 A.M. Sermon by Rev. Edward H. Redman:
"Darwin"
6:00 P.M. Unitarian Student Dinner. Rev. Wil-
liam D. Hammond, Grosse Pointe Unitarian
Church, speaker. .
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave., NO 2-3580
Henry Kuizenga, Minister.
Wm. S. Baker, University Pastor

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
Sundays-10:00 A.M. - 11:00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, Minister,
Charles Burns.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays- 1:00 to 1:30 P.M.
WHRV-Sundays 9:15 A.M.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 10:45 A.M.: Service, with .sermon by
the pastor, "The Call of Lent."
Sunday at 6:00 P.M.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Club, Supper and Program.
Wednesday at 7:30 P.M.: Ash Wednesday Lenten
Vespers, with sefmon by the pastor, "Why
Christ Went Up To Jerusalem." Celebration
of Holy Communion.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director.
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421.
10:00 Morning Service
7:00 Evening Service.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North. Main
Rev. Andrew Missiras
9:30 Matins
10:00 Sunday School.
10:30 Divine Liturgy
Sermon in Greek and English.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Avenue
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Morse Saito, Student Director.
10:45 Worship Service. Sermon: "We Believe in
the Lordship of Christ," by Rev. Press.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron
Chester H. Loucks and Duane L. Day, Min
isters. Student Advisor: Beth Mahone.
Sunday, February 12:
9:45-The Student Class will continue its study
of the "Parables of Jesus."
11:00-Sermon: "Color Blind." Rev. Loucks.
7:00-Rodger Williams Guild Worship Service.
8:00-Choral Even Song.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State & Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor.
10 o'clock-Sunday School.
11 o'clock-"Dedication to the Lord."
7 o'clock-"The Grace of God at Work."
Wednesday-7:30 Prayer Meeting.
We Welcome You.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and Williams Streets
Minister, Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Church School and Junior Church at 10:45 A.M.
Public Worship10:45 A.M. Subject of Dr. Parr's
sermon, "Toasting Marshmallows at a World
Conflagration."
Student Guild will have supper at the guild house
with incoming students as guests.

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the younger

set of every beach

and country club dotes on
Sailing Blues

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on the pocket.
m. Sailing Blue
The Shorts, 5.00

TRIM SLEEVELESS SHIRT with an
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'The Shirt, 4.50

embroidered emblem
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SLEEVELESS SAILOR DRESS. Front buttoning, tape trimmed with em-
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Matching Bag, 5.95

i

11

Monv timanu nnra rntnr!e and enmbina#ienso 1 r7Ol:;

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