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February 19, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE: FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1955

IT'S IN THE BOOK:
Dismayed Seniors Find
Mysteries in Catalog

By ARIAS GARON
"You mean I was ┬župposed to
read all this stuff in the cata-
logue?"
"But my advisor told me it
would be all right!"
"Do I have to take that course
now?"
Comments such as these sound
familiar to the Recorders for Sen-
ior Records in the Registrar's of-
fice. They are busy for the first
few weeks of the semester inter-
viewing seniors who have neg-
lected some detail in their records
which could prevent their gradua-
tion.
50 Per Cent Short
More than 50 per cent of sen-
iors, entering their last semester
have been informed that they are
short one or more credit hours for
graduation, are missing a distri-
bution requirement, or have failed
to meet some other regulation.
"Details, technicalities-anyway,
they are ridiculous!" commented
an irritated coed who had just
been notified that she was one of
many students forgetting to sign
a concentration slip at the end
of her sophomore year.
According to Assistant Regis-
trar Edward G. Groesbeck, all
graduation requirements are list-
JGP Choruses
Plan Rehearsals
Junior Girls' Play's singing
chorus D' is to meet today at 1
p.m. at the League.
From 2 to 4 p.m., Chorus 'B'
(athletes) will meet and from 3 to
4 p.m., chorus C (homebodies) are
to meet. Chorus A (sophisticates)
are to meet from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Fountain Pens C3
Greeting Cards
StationeryQ
Office Supplies
Typewriters
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files
MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177
Open Saturday til 5 P.M.

ed in the college bulletin. Prob-
lems which arise are generally the
result of student apathy to reading
the catalogue.
"It may be there all right," re-
acted a senior, "but in vague un-
intelligible words hidden in small
print."
Burden on Students
Groesbeck agreed that students
may have difficulty in understand-
ing the announcement. He said
there are "innumerable details
of permissions and prohibitions
with the burden of completing
thesedegree requirements placed
on the students."
The C a t alog Committee of
each college has a difficult job, he
believes. Condensing it would omit
important details and expanding it
for clarity would make it too long.
Unable to Interpret
Students have reported academ-
ic counsellors are unable to inter-
pret the intricacies of detail and
sometimes appeal to the Chairman
of Academic Counsellors for help.
Is Anthropology 31 social sci-
ience or natural science distribu-
tion credit? An early clarification
of this point would have helped
many seniors who planned to
count it for natural science dis-
tribution and found they couldn't
because they had also taken An-
thropology 32.
Received No Credit
"A semester's work for nothing!"
complained a distressed coed. "And
I really need those four credit
hours." She had taken French 1
without following it with French 2
and thus received no credit.
"I'm sure my friend John got
more credit than this when he
dropped ROTC," argued one boy.
In answer to a statement like
this, Groesbeck emphasized each
case is individual. What applies
for one student may appear com-
pletely different in another case.
Groesbeck suggested students
carefully plan their curriculum
with their counsellors and concen-
tration advisors during their first
three and one-half ye rs.
He urged them to get distribu-
tion requirements fulfilled early
and also to have a few extra hours
credit padding to allow for fail-
ures or drops.

SCIENTIST OBSERVES MANUFACTURED DIAMONDS
GE Laboratories Produce
Diamonds for Industry

Subscribe to
The Daily Now!

-~

m

By ETHEL KOVITZ
Will an American scientific dis-
covery indirectly aid Russia in pre-
paring for war?
This question has been pon-
dered by scientists throughout the
world since General Electric re-
cently announced that its labora-
tories could manufacture dia-
monds, according to one spokes-
man.
General Electric's top scientist,
C. Guy Suits made it clear that
his laboratories have produced di-
amonds not "imitation" or "dia-
mond-like" stones.
This is the only substance ever
produced by man hard enough to
scratch a natural diamond.
100 Produced So Far
The stones reproduce the same
distinctive pattern when pierced
U'-Produced
Film Honors
Soo Centennial
First official showing of a Uni-
versity-produced sound color mo-
tion picture. "The Locks of Saulte
Ste Marie," was held yesterday
for members of the press, the
Soo Locks Centennial Celebration
Commission and the Michigan
Historical Commission.
Directed by Ford L. Lemer of
the Audio-Visual Education Cen-
ter, the film is part of the Univer-
sity's contribution to the centen-
nial celebration at the Soo.
The film will be shown Monday
night in Lansing at a joint session
of the House and the Senate.
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher will address the session.
On February 28, the film will
be shown at the Soo at a dinner
meeting of University alumni, and
it will be shown publicly after the
dinner meeting.
The University has also pub-
lished a 36-page booklet, "The
Saulte Canal Through 100 Years,"
by F. Clever Bald of the Michigan
Historical Collections. T h i r t y
thousand copies of the booklet
have been distributed and a sec-
ond printing is contemplated.
Student Hearing
Set for March 10
Deportation hearing for Buick
Navidzadeh, Grad., will next be
held March 10 following a three-
week adjournment granted
Thursday, Prof. Beauford J.
George of the Law School said
yesterday.
During the next meeting con-
ducted by the Immigration Serv-
ice an additional witness will tes-
tify on Navidzadeh's behalf. At
present, action taken or hearings
after the March 10 sessionare
indefinite, Prof. George concluded.

by x-rays as do the natural prod-
uct. So far 100 small diamonds
have been produced. They are of
industrial quality resembling those
used in cutting and boring tools.
The spokesman added that Rus-
sia today is not able to buy as
many of these industrial diamonds
as she needs. The lack held Ger-
many back in the last war as the
diamonds were needed in the man-
ufacture of precision parts in guns,
tanks and airplanes. Russia, too,
is handicapped because the United
States buys most of the world's
supply of diamonds, he continued.
It is strongly feared that if the
United States is able to manufac-
ture enough diamonds to satisfy
its needs, countries whose economy
depends upon diamond sales will
be forced to do business with Rus-
sia, according to the spokesman.
Other Problems Arise
Still other problems may grow
out of the recent discovery, he
said. For example, what will hap-
pen to the hardened metal manu-
facturers in this country? These
people earn their living making
cheap substitutes for industrial
diamonds. If diamonds can be
manufactured at a low cost, they
will be out of business.
For the present time at least,
the gem diamond industry has
little to fear from the recent dis-
covery, he feels. It is highly im-
probable that enough pressure to
make gem diamonds will be ob-
tainable for several years to come.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETINJ
(Continued from Page 2)
The Extension Services announces the
following class to begin Mon. evening,
Feb. 21:
Hydraulics and Dynamics-Engineer-
ing Mechanics Review III. 7:00 p.m.
Room 171 School of Business Admini-
stration. Intensive review designed to
prepare candidates for civil service or
other engineering examinations. A min
imum of advanced mathematics is used.
Lecture notes are available. Eight weeks.
$9.00. Prof. Roy S. Swinton, Instructor.
Registration for this class may be
made at the first meeting of the class.
Make-up exam in Economics 51, 52,
53, and 54 Thurs., Feb. 24 at 3:10 p.m.,
207 Economics Building.
Seminar in Chemical Physics. Mon.,
Feb. 21, 4:10 p.m. in Room 2308 Chem-
istry. Dr. Guido Vidale will speak on
"Flush Photolysis."
Concerts?
The Budapest String Quartet-Josef
Roismann and Alexander Schneider, vi-
olins; Boris K'royt, viola ,and Mischa
Schneider. cello; will perform. in the
three concerts of the 15th Annual
Chamber Music Festival Fri. and Sat.
nights, and Sun. afternoon, Feb. 18, 19,
20. At the Sun. afternoon concert the
group will be assisted by Robert Courte,
violist in two quintets.
The programs to be heard are as fol-
lows:
Fri., Feb. 18, 8:30 p.m.-Haydn Quar-
tet in G, No. 1; Lees Quartet No. 1; and
the Schubert in A minor, Op. 29,
Sat., Feb. 1, 8:30 p.m.-Mozart Quar-
tet in D, K. 499; William Denny's Quar-
tet No. 2; and the Quartet in E minor,
No. 2 by Beethoven.
Sun., Feb. 20, 2:30 p.m.-Beethoven
Quintet in C major; Bartok Quartet No.
1; and the Brahms Quintet in G major,
Op. 111.
Tickets are on sale at the offices of
the University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower; and will also be on sale an
hour before each concert in the lobby
of the Rackham Building.
Events Today
Wesleyan Guild. Sat., Feb. 19. All
those going on the SpiritualtLife Re-
treat at Port Huron, meet in the lounge
at 7:00 a.m. Please be prompt!
S.R.A. Saturday Lunch-"Desegrega-
tion in Schools North and South."
Marjorie Frogel and Theodore Beals will
discuss findings of the Nationl Youth
Legislative Conference held in Washing-
ton, D.C. by the NAACP, 12:15m. Lane
Hall.
Coming Eventsj
Lutheran Student Association. Meet
at the Center promptly at 6:45 p.m.
Sun., Feb. 20 to go to the Universal
Day of Prayer Service at the St. An-
drew's Episcopal Church. Those who
live near there can meet us there at
7:30 p.M.
Graduate Outing Club meets Sun.
2:00 p.m. at the Rackham Building.
Come in old clothes to the north west
entrance.
Meeting of all men and women in-
terested in helping write, edit and direct
the Independent Hillelzapoppin Skit,
the Traumatic Players, Sun., Feb. 20,
8:00 p.m. Hiilel Bldg.
Westminster Student Fellowship Bi-
ble Seminar in Room 217 of the Pres-
byterian Student Center at 11:00 a.m.,
Sun., Feb. 20. Discussion on, "When
Heaven Comes to Earth."
Episcopal Student Foundation. Can-
terbury House breakfasts following both
the 8:00 and 9:00 _.m. services Sun.,

Hillel: Chorus rehearsal
pm. Main chapel

Feb. 20. Confirmation Instruction, 4:301
p.m., Sun., Feb. 20, at Canterbury
House. Canterbury Supper Hour at 5:45
p.m., Sun., Feb. 20, at Canterbury
House, followed by the Interguild-spon-
sored World Student Day of Prayer at
7:00 p.m. in Saint Andrew's Church. Dr.
Joseph Sittler, preaching. Coffee hour
will follow the service.

FT

Hillel: Supper Club. 6:00 p.m. Sun.,
Feb. 20.
New Testament Study Group --
"Searching the Synoptics for Meaning
in Today's World." Under the direc-
tion of Prof. E. Wendell Hewson. Lane
Hall, Sun., Feb. 20, 3:00 p.m.
Lane Hall Folk Dance Group will meet
Mon., Feb. 21, 7:30-10:00 p.m. in the
recreation room. Plans for an exhibi-
tion group will be discussed. Instruction
for every dance, pnd beginners are al-
ways welcome.
The Romance Languages Journal Club
will meet Wed., Feb. 23, at 4:15 p.m.,
in the East Conference Room of the
Rackham Building.nSpeakers: Prof.
Victor E. Graham, "A Report on the
Progress of a Critical Edition of the
Works of Philippe Desportes"; Miss Ed-
eglard Conradt, "The Problem of Re-
ality in Cervantes."

11-

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Sun., 4:30

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group with Prof.
Sam Estep on: "The Federal Security Sys-
tem."
11:00 A.M.-Services of Worship: Rev. Edward
H. Redman on: "Let US Be Tolerant, Too!"
5:00 P.M.-Pot-luck for High Schoolers and an
Orientation Course on Unitarianism and Uni-
versalism.
7:30 P.M-Unitarian Student Group after 7:15
Transportation pick-up from Lane Hall: Panel
on "Unitarian Beliefs,"
8:00 P.M.-Adult Group Lecture: Harold A.
Cranefield, Gen'l Counsel for UAW-CIO:
"Labor's Point of View on Government Secur-
ity and Individual Liberties".
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister-Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
Church School in the Nursery at 10:45; also Jun-
ior Church in the Douglas Chapel.
Public worship at 10:45. Dr. Parr will preach on
"Plain Christianity."
The service is broadcast over WHRV from 11:30
to noon.
Student. Guild. Dessert in Mayflower Room at
6:00 p.m. This will be followed by a joint
Student Day of Prayer service in St. Andrew's
Episcopal Church.

..........

Kalamazoo County Juvenile Court
Probation Officer 1
The Kalamazoo County Juvenile Court,
has an opening for a male college grad-
uate as Juvenile Court Probation Officer 1.
Applicants must have Bachelor of Arts
Degree in Sociology, Psychology, Social
Work, or related field. Salary $ 3,570-
$4,170. For further information contact-
W. WILLIAM BLACKMORE
County Juvenile Agent
Kalamazoo County Building--Kalamazoo, Mlichigan

I

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'Opera

Scenarios

Top Off Your Evenings
at the
MIILK MAID DRIVE-INN
RESTAURANT
Open 11 A.M. - 12:30 P.M.
3730 Washtenaw Near Pittsfield Village
ORDERS TO GO- NO 8-7146

Scenarios for the 1955 Union
Opera are due March 10.
Entries may be turned in at the
main desk in the Union, according
to Jay Grant, '55. For further in-
formation, contact Grant, NO 3-
5437.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-"THE VICTORY OF FAITH"
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"AN URGENT INVITATION"
Wednesday, 7:30-Prayer Meeting
WE WELCOME YOU!

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Hundreds of close-out from old libraries
and stock at extremely attractive prices.
Browse at Our Bargain Tables.
9c and up
Overbeck Bookstore
1216 South University

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i
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FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Edward Sue, University
Pastors
Sermon Topic: "We Are the Lord's"
Sunday morning discussion following early service
11:00.
5:30-Student Dinner
Evening WSF fellowship 6:45.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship "Still Seeking
Power That Lasts." Dr Abbey Preaching.
9:30 A.M.-There will be no Student Seminar
this week due to Spiritual Life Retreat.
6:45 P.M.-Meet in Wesley Lounge, go to St.
Andrew's Episcopal Church for "Universal
Day of Prayer for Students"
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms. Open
Daily.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephanou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.--Orthodox Stu-
dent Guild.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M.-Worship Services, Sermon by Rev.
Press, "Opportunity Passing By"

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship services,
with the .pastor preaching on "The Christian's
,Prayer Life"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Talk by Mrs. John
Morovitz of Detroit.
Wednesday at 7:30: Ash Wednesday Vesper Ser-
vice, with Holy Communion. Sermon, "Mary
of Bethany-Beloved Believer"
Wednesday at 9:15: Devotional service, with
repetition of the sermon of the earlier service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P, M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks. Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
Sunday, Feb. 20-
9:45-Student class studies Revalations
11:00-Sermon
6:45-Guild meets at Guild House to go to
Episcopal Church
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
10:00 A.M.-Young Friends
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship. Visitors We-
come.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M. - 11.00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7 :30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundays-i1:00-1 :30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
Confirmation instruction at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 5:45 P.M.
Inter Guild-sponsored World Student Day of Prayer
at 7 P.M. Dr. Joseph Sittler of the Chicago
Lutheran Seminary will Preach. A coffee hour
will follow the service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-Sunday Morning Service
Feb. 20-Sermon-"Mind"
8:00 P,M.-Wednesday Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor

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