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February 15, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-15

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AGE EI HT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1955

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-Daily-Dick Gaskill

Work Resumed on Addition
To Union Despite Weather

Although weather has caused a
few days' delay, construction on
the Union addition continues.
The Regents have approved
plans to add two more floors to
the original addition., Completion
of the project is expected by Dec.
1, according to Frank Kuenzel,
general manager of the Union.
He said that "parts of the build-
ing will be open before Dec. 1."
At this time, most of the foot-
ings ar'e in place, except on one
side where a roadway runs through
the scooped-out area.
The steel structure that is now
standing is the elevator shaft.
Kuenzel noted that the present
Union passenger elevators must
be used as freight carriers be-
cause the other was taken out in
the course of demolition. The new
elevator is expected to be in op-
eration by April.
Budapest Quartet
To Open Series
Playing in the 15th annual
Chamber Music Festival, sponsor-
ed by the University Musical So-
ciety, the Budapest String Quar-
tet will present the first in a series
of three concerts on Friday in
Rackham Auditorium.
The Budapest String Quartet
makes more than 100 appearances
a year, including its annual long-
term engagement in the Library
of Congress.
Both series and single concert
tickets are available in the Bur-
ton Tower offices of the Musical
Society.

Kuenzel also said that the Un-
ion's elevators will be turned 90
degrees so that the complete Un-
ion corridor will be clear.
Young Democrats
To Hold Elections
The Ann Arbor Young Demo-
crat Club will elect officers and
make plans for the coming semes-
ter at a meeting at 7:30 p.m. to-
morrow in the League.
For entertainment the group
will play "The Investigator," a
recorded satire of a United States
Senator.
r DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Reorganization Meeting of the Co-
Recreational Badminton Club,. Wed.,
Feb. 16, in Barbour Gym at 7:00 p.m.
Come prepared to play after the meet-
ing.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House,
Wed., Feb. 16, after the 7:00 a.m. Holy
Communion.
Industrial Relations Club meeting
Wed., Feb. 16, Stanley H. Brams, edi-
tor and publisher, Detroit Labor
Trends, "I Cover the Labor Front," at
7:30 p.m. In theB us. Ad. student
lounge.

'Shtiggy'
NEW ORLEANS ()') - Nine
hours of "Shtiggy Boom" greet-
ed the listeners of a New Or-
leans radio station yesterday
when two disc jockeys locked
themselves in the transmission
room and played the record
from 6 a.m. on into the after-
noon.
The performance started as a
gag and got out of hand when
the two men refused to answer
the phone
Sole interruptions of the rec-
ord were the regular ccmmer-
cials.
Air Invention
Credit Here
Incorrect
A predecessor of the Wright
brothers was incorrectly credited
for many years in the United
States with the invention of the
first successful airplane, according
to Captain J. Laurence Pritchard,
former secretary of the Royal Aer-
onautical Society of Great Britain.
In a lecture entitled, "The
Wright Brothers-from an Eng-
lishman's Point of View," spon-
sored by the aeronautical depart-
ment of the Engineering College,
Capt. Pritchard said that prior to
the Wright Brothers' successful
flight at Kitty Hawk; North Caro-
line in 1903, the Smithsonian In-
stitute had sponsored the flying
experiments of Samuel Langley.
Langley Experiments Failed
Langley's attempts to fly all
ended in failure. When the Wright
brothers appeared with their
"lighter-than-air" machine, the
Institule refused to accept the
failures of Langley and insisted
that he was the originator
Consequently, he said, the
Wright brothers took their pat-
ents to England, where they were
accepted within three months aft-
er being filed.1
Exceptional Men
The inventors, Capt. Pritchard
said, were probably exceptional
men in several ways. Their back-
ground consisted only of bicycle
repairing, and from 1903 to 1911,
they used figures obtained with a
sixteen inch square wind-tunnel.
In 1932, the Smithsonian Insti-
tute realized that the Wright
brothers had made the first suc-
cessful flight, and then published
their accounts.
It was not until 1948, however,
that the location of their plane
was moved from the Science Mu-
seum in South Kensington, Lon-
don, where it had been for twenty
years, to the Smithsonian Insti-
tute.

G&S Society
Picks Leads
For Iolanthe
Leading parts for the forthcon-
ing Gilbert and Sullivan Society
production of "Iolanthe" were an-
nounced last night.
The Lord Chancellor will be
played by Robert Brandzell, '57M,
The Earl of Mountararat by Ar-
nulp Esterer and the Earl of Toll-
oller by Alan Crofoot, Grad.
Jbeseph Wyckoff will be seen as
Private Willis, John Geralt as
Strephon and the Fairy Queen will
be played by Marian Mercer, '57M.
Playing the part of lolanthe w#i1
be Lynn Tunnel while Joan Holm-
berg, '57M, will be seen as Phyllis,
Katy .Micou, '57M, as Celia and
Beatrice Berger, '56M, as Lelia.
The operetta is scheduled to be
presented April 13 through 16 in
the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
and April 23 in Detroit.
"Iolanthe" is the second presen-
tation in the Gilbert and Sullivan
Society's bi-annual schedule. The
production will be planned, direct-
ed and staged entirely by Univer-
sity students.
Group To Give
Herbert Comedy
"The Moon Is Blue," recent
Broadway hit by F. Hugh Her-
bert, will be presented by the Ann
Arbor Civic Theater at 8 p.m. to-
morrow through Saturday at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Tickets for all performances are
priced at $1.50 and can be pur-
chased at the Lydia Mendelssohn
box office this week.
Book Exchange
A recount of Student Book Ex-
change sales for this semester sent
the figure over the $9,000 mark,
assistant manager of the Exchange
Harvey Freed, '56, said yesterday.
- ri- - - - -

Life

AT 'U' MUSEUM:

Via Fossils on

View
"NE OF THE largest university
museums in the country is
found behind the tradition-encas-
ed lions in the large V-shaped
building on the way to the wo-
men's residence halls.
A wing of the building contains
offices of the anthropology, bot-
any, paleontology and zoology mu-
seums as well as work rooms for
mounting, stuffing and repairing.
An extensive view o f l i f e
through the ages is seen in the
Hall of Evolution.
Ancient Relics
Fossils of some of the earliest
and some of the largest animals
that ro meaeadr ild. ....a noann
that roamed earth, sepecially in
and around the state, are on exhi-
bition. Some of the figures are
mounted, others are pictured in
their environment.
Discovered in 1944, the remains
of a mastodon found in the state
are considered the most complete
and the best preserved. Mastodons
lived perhaps as late as 20 thous-
and years ago when the last ice
sheet was receding across north-
ern Michigan.
Early Porcupine
The dimetrodon ,while a slow-
moving animal, was fierce and car-
nivorous and usually left alone be-
cause of the sharp spines on his
back.
Anatosaurus or duckbilled dino-
saurs, were extant about 75 mil-
lion years before' man. The one
pictured below was found in Mon-
tana in 1939. It died at the edge
of a stream, buried in mud and
sand so quickly that the carcass
was loosely studded with small
bony plates.
In the background are some of
the dinosaur's contemporaries. All
disappeared soon after, the time
represented.
Indian Tomb
The skeleton of a young Indian
woman was 47 Inches beneath
ground level when found in 1927.
The grave was covered by a mound
14 inches high and 11 feet in dia-
S meter surrounded by a ditch 8
inches deep.
Lengths of eras with their cli-
mates and inhabitants are detail-
ed in a large colored mual "Life
Through Geologic Time."
Besides animal fossils, there are
some petrified tree trunks from
Indiana snd Arizona on view.
Life through adaptation or ac-
climation or environmental change
becomes even more vivid among
the relics of the museum.

to

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THE DEVELOPMENT OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS THROUGH GEOLOGIC TIME

DAILY
PHOTO
FEATUR
Story by
HARRY STRAUS
.Pictures by
DICK GASKILL

STRINGED
INSTRUMENTS
Repair-
Reconditioning
Accessories
A#~ajk le

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6IMETRODON: PROTECTION PERSONIFIED

STRING SHOP
211 South State
Phone NO 3-3874

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ONE OF THE BEST PRESERVED MASTODONS IN THE WORLD INDIAN SKELETON

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