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February 15, 1955 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15,1955

RN- MICI[IGAN TIAT1' V

TUESAYFEBRARY15,1955ifl M Lr'i TtI A Ti

PAGiE THREE

K

CAMPUS
CALENDAR
Church Colleges . .
Curriculum planning and teach-
ing certification will be the topics
under discussion at a conference
of nine Protestant liberal arts
colleges in Michigan beginning at
10 a.m. today in the East Confer-
ence Room of the Rackham Build-
ing.
Participating in the Conference
of Church Related Colleges spon-
sored by the University Commit-
tee on College Relations, will be
Albion, Adrian, Kalamazoo, Oli-
vet, Hope, Calvin, Emanuel Mis-
* sionary, Hillsdale and Alma Col-
leges.
* * *
McCord Speech*...
Dr. Carey P. McCord, resident
lecturer in internal medicine will
speak on "The History of Lead
Poisoning" at 4 p.m. today, in
the School of Public Health au-
ditorium.
Dr. McCord's talk will trace the
history of lead poisoning begin-
ning in Greece up to the present
time, noting that lead poisoning
is one of the oldest diseases in the
world.
* * *
Cooley Lecture .*, *
Concluding the annual Cooley
Lecture series for this year, Prof.
Lewis N. Simes will speak at 4:15
p.m. today in Rm. 110, Hutchins
Hall, on "The Dead Hand
Achieves Immortality: Gifts to
Charity."
The lecture will deal with ex-
ceptions to rules restricting will
makers when charity is involved.
Non-legal students have been in-
vited to attend.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

MARKED PRECISION:
Pershing Rifles Provide Color for Campus Functions

fr

.0l

TRY OUR

By DICK SNYDER
"Triangle halt ... Queen Anne's
right shoulder arms . . . Queen
Anne's salute!"
These words form a small part
of the extra vocabulary neces-
sary for all members of Pershing
Rifles, national military honorary
fraternity. With constant prac-
tice, their translation into action
gives one of the many drill for-
mations for which they are noted.
Blue and White Insignia
F A blue and white fourragere
worn on the left shoulder is the
distinguishing insignia of PR's
at the University. Company D,
Third Regiment, with headquar-
ters on campus, participates in
drill, field maneuvers and special
functions regularly during the
course of each semester.
Under the command of Cadet
Capt. Robert A. Miller, '55 BAd,
Company D has taken part in
many military activities and serv-
ices during this school year.
Since its beginning in 1948, it
has had a high record of partici-
pation in such functions. Most
recent of these services was dur-
ing registration when members
acted as aides to the regular mili-
tary officers.
Flag Raisers
The color guard which raises
the flag high over Michigan Sta-
dium on football afternoons in
the fall is a familiar sight to the
student body. This ceremony is
performed by ex-Pershing Rifle-
men in conjunction with Naval
ROTC students.
Typical of the special services
which the group undertakes is the
honor guard. In October, six men
commanded by C/Capt. Miller
served as a grave-side firing party
at a serviceman's funeral.
PR will supply ushers for ROTC
cadets and their dates when Ralph
Marterie provides music for the
coming Military Ball.
Ball.
Drill work is the most notable

I-

Wash and Dry Bundle

TUMBLED FLUFFY DRY
SPARKLING CLEAN
FOLDED AND WRAPPED

9 lbs. $1.00

...10c each additional pound

I

KYER MODEL LAUNDRY
AND CLEANERS

814 S. State

627 S. Main
Phone NO 3-4185

1304 S. University

-Daily-John Hrtzel
TO THE QUEEN-PERSHING RIFLEMEN IN ONE OF . THEIR INTRICATE ROUTINES

of the organization's activities.
Among the drill meets in which
Company D participates are the
Detroit Field Day, Illinois Invita-
tional Rifle and Drill Meet and the
Third Regimental Drill Meet at
Bloomington, Indiana. At the lat-
ter convocation, commanding of-
ficers of the various companies in
the regiment hold conference.
Precision Personified
Fancy white helmets, belts,
gloves and spats and marching
drill ,movements have been a
part of more than a few Ann Ar-
bor parades. University PR men
took part in last year's Michigras
parade, drawing applause for their
precision performance.
The National Society of Persh-
ing Rifles, named after Gen. John
J. Pershing, is made up of Army
and Air Force ROTC cadets who
seek to further their general mili-

10% DISCOUNT
FOR MATINEE PERFORMANCE ONLY
This ad good on 1 pair of tickets-Thru Thurs., Feb. 17, 6 P.M.
BIR A ND STmA of'55 N
ORCHESTRA
SROL ARMERTRIO StG
Saturday, February 19-2 Shows Only-2:30 P.M. and 8:30 P.M.
MASONIC TEMPLE AUDITORIUM-Tickets on sale at Grinnell's, Detroit
A REAL
FUTURE
AWAITS YOU
WITH A GROWING
Weapons System Organization

tary proficiency and to condition
themselves for actual participa-
tion in dress drill. The Society
was established in 1894 to pro-
duce better Reserve officers and
closer inter-service relations.
Limited Membership
Only basic cadets enrolled in
the two military programs may
apply for membership in PR.
Freshmen gain opportunities in
activities and training which are
unavailable to their ROTC class-
mates not in the organization.
Sophomores have chances to ap-
ply themselves in leadership and
special drill.
Applicants for membership in
Pershing Rifles undergo a one-
semester pledge period, after
'Guaranteed Wage'
Topic for Contest
"The Guaranteed A n n u a l
Wage" will be the topic of the
Cooley Essay Contest which is
open to any undergraduate in the
College of Engineering.
Deadline for the 2,000 word es-
say is May 9. Essays are to be
left in Dean Emmon's office, 259
West Engineering.
Held mainly to encourage engi-
neers to broaden their interests
beyond technical training, prizes
will include $400 first prize, $200
second, $100 third and up to ten
additional prizes of $50 each.
Ohigren To Speak

which they participate in an in-
formal initiation and a forma
ceremony, establishing them as
members in active standing. For-
mal pledge initiation for the lat-
est group enlisted was held Feb. 6
in the program are the company
Unit Staff
The only advanced corps men
in the program the the company
officers and those who take par
in special exhibition drill. C/Capt
Miller, a senior in Army ROTC
is aided in his Company D com-
mand duties by a staff comprised
of C/WO William Chase, '57,
C/1st Lt. John Cole, '56, C/2nd
Lts. William Corson, '56E, and
G e o r g e Hill, '56BAd, and
C/M/Sgt. Gary Boe, '57.
Capt. John H. Van Nest, USAF,
and Capt. Norbert J. Wayne, USA,
are advisors to the group. Assist-
ing them is Army SFC Ross H.
Swenson.
PR is holding an informal
smoker 7:30 Wednesday in Rm.
264, Temporary Classroom Build-
ing. It, is open to all first and
second year Army and Air Force
ROTC students interested in be-
coming members of the group.
0Clean
s*New
0 Modern
,4p6op JXote/
8170 Jackson Rd. Ph. HA 6.8134
3-A Approval

p -
s READ AND"USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
-
.l
tBUDAPEST QUARTET
JOSEF ROISEMAN . . . . . Viola
ALEXANDER SCHNEIDER ..Violin
BORIS KROYT Viola
MISCHA SCHNEIDER . . . . Cello
' assisted by
ROBERT COURTE . , . . . . . Viola
in
CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL'
FEB. 18, 19, 20
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL
TICKETS: SEASON $2.50, $3.50: SINGLE $1.25, $1.75
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER
FRANCESCATTI. . . . . . Mon., Mar. 7
BERLIN PHILHARMONIC . . . . March 15

Four-]Point Gained
By 21 Engineers
Attaining a four-point average
is possible.
The College of Engineering an-
nounces the names of the fol-
lowing students who had an all
"A" average for the fall semester:
Richard Annable, '56E; John
Baxter, 57E; Wilbur. Brown, '56E;
Donald DeVries; Kenneth Ed-
wards; Richard Fowler, 156E;
Ward Getty; William Gray;
Dwight Heim, '56E; Tawfig Khou-
ry, '55E; Thomas King, jr., '58E.
The list continues with: John
Meyer, '56E; James Midgley,
'56E; James Pua, Spec.; Robert
Reynolds, '57E; Gordon Roberts,
'56E; James Roof, '55E; Robert
Schoenhals, '55E; George Small,
'56E; Leslie Tinckniell, '57E; and
Robert Wesel, '56E.

At TEMCO a two-fold opportunity awaits
engineers, physicists and mathematicians
who want to grow professionally.
First, the entire engineering department is organized
under the systems concept. This necessitates the combined
services of civil, electrical, mechanical and aeronautical
engineers, physicists and mathematicians, all of whom will
have the opportunity -indeed, will be required - to be-
come familiar with all areas in the aeronautical sciences.
Highly specialized work will be demanded, of course, but
it will be conducted within the stimulating framework of
a broader background in related fields. Your opportunities,
here, for professional growth are unlimited.
Second, TEMCO offers a Master Engineering Training
Program designed to develop today's engineering grad-
uates into the systems engineers of the future. This program
includes a Graduate Study Plan leading to Master of Science
degrees, and a Job Rotation Plan which permits you both
to specialize without confinement and to diversify without
loss of direction.

I

it

r7

The Kalamazoo County Juvenile Court
has an opening for a male college grad-
uate as Juvenile Court Probation Officer.
Applicants must have Bachelor of Arts

II

11

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