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May 26, 1955 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-26

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I
d

PAGE SIX

THE MICHGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MAY 26. 1955

__ ...___.,_..a , _ _ ,., .,.,..

17

CITY EDITOR DOROTHY MYERS:
'Great Suffragette' Leaves Daily Post
0>

I'ren i s w

11

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is an unassigned story-and the
reporter assumes full responsibility.
D.H.M.)
By DEBRA DURCHSLAG
"The Great Suffragette" takes
her crusading banner and marches
determinedly out of the University
this June.
Dorothy Myers, first woman City
Editor of The Michigan Daily, the
youngest lobbyist registered in the
State, and Young Democrat na-
tional committeewoman of Michi-
gan; has justly earned her reputa-
tion of "first with the news or
know the reason why."
"If she had been born in time,
she would have.been picketing the
White House for womer.'s rights,"
comments a fellow Daily editor.
Daily headlines testify to her
sixth sense for news, and Daily
legend testifies to her delight in
a good healthy rumor.
"Fire-Engine-Chaser"
Miss Myers admits that The
Daily attracted her interest be-
cause it was the "center of things
interesting on campus." As City
Editor, she proved herself a news-
paperwoman. "Dorothy was what
you might call a fire-engine-chas-
er," says a colleague. "She never
let a lead get by without seeing if
it had 'the makings of a good story.
In fact, with her, the art of snoop-
ing was a science."
Scientific or not, Miss Myers has
a sense of humor that matches her
news sense. It may be one more
evidence of her ability to be on
the inside of things, but one cam-
pus notable swears that "Dot
knows more jokes than anyone
else I kiow."
Daily staffers remember the
time Managing Editor Harry Lunn
*announced the traditional Mon-
day night meeting as "formal"--
and Dorothy showed up in a strap-
less gown. "He promised cocktails
and never delivered," she recalls
indignantly.
Quick Sandwiches, Little Sleep
Her routine has slowed down
somewhat now that she has re-
tired from office, but at the peak
of her career "The Great Suffra-
gette" practically livpd on quick
sandwiches and the minimum of
sleep.
When she lived in Martha Cook,
a lunch was packed for her or she
might not have gotten anything to
eat. Next to dashing off to Lan-
sing to sell the 18-year old vote
-and pondering over one of her
famous critic sheets on the day's
paper, eating was secondary.'
A Typical Day
A typical Myers' day might run
like this: up at 8 a.m., over to The
Daily to get out the assignment
sheet, off to Lansing for some
lobbying, back to The Daily to
check on stories, and then maybe
a little studying for the next day.
It was during this time that she

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(Continued Yrom Page 4)
Study of the Reactions of Diborane
with Methyl Substituted Hydroxyla-
mines and with Phosphorus Trifluor-
ide," Fri., May 27, 3003 Chemistry Bldg.,
at 10:00 a.m. Chairman, R. W. Parry.
Doctor Examination for Joshua Har-
lan Carey, Anatomy; thesis: "Certain
Anatomical and Functional Interrela-
tions between the Tegmentum of the
Midbrain and the Basal Ganglia," Fri.,
May 27, 4558 East Medical Bldg., at 3:00
p.m. Chairman, E. C. Crosby.
Doctoral Examination for William
Louis Fowler, Education; thesis: "A
Comparative Analysis of Pupil Per-
formance on Conventional and Culture-
Controlled Mental Tests," Fri., May 27,
East Council Room, Rackham Bldg., at
8:00 a.m. Chairman, H. G. Ludlow.
Doctoral Examination for Horace
Floyd Quick, Wildlife Management;
thesis: "The Fur Resource of a Wild-
erness Region in Northern British Co-
lumbia," Tues., June 7, 1045 Natural
Science Bldg., at 9:00 a.m. Chairman,
W. W. Chase.
Doctoral Examination for William
Clinton Eilet, Jr., Political Science;
thesis: "Atomic Cities: The Atomic
Energy Act and the States," Tues.,
June 7, 617 Haven Hall, at 9:30 a.m.
Chairman, E. S. Brown.
Doctoral Examination for Robert H.
Pealy, Political Science; thesis: "A
Comparative Study of Property Tax
Administration in Illinois and Michi-
gan with Emphasis on State Adminis-
tradition of Inter-County Equalization,"
Tues., June 14, East Council Room,

-Daily-John Hirtzel.
DOROTHY MYERS... "If she had been born in time, she would
have been picketing the White House for women's rights."

learned "just how quickly it -was
possible for one to eat" and "how
to make the half-hour you have
to study before an exam really
count."
The young woman lobbyist was
herself a story, quickly snapped up
by Life magazine, Mademoiselle
and United Press Movietone News
among others-and much to her
surprise, Miss Myers found her-
self something of a celebrity
Lobbying, Serious Business
However, lobbying was a serious
business to her, and she has helped
to make the chances of the 18-
year old voting bill very favorable
in the next session of the State
legislature.
Another important job was her
position of national committee-
woman for the Young Democrat
clubs. She characterizes herself as
a strong Democrat "because they
serve a larger part of the popu-
lace than Republicans," but
doesn't expect great things out of
any political, party or platform.
"It is difficult for people who par-
ticipate actively in politics to re-
main idealists," she says.
Part-Time Pianist
In the Myers' background is a
one-time aspiration to be a con-
cert pianist. In high school she
did a great deal of recital work,
playing for private clubs as well
as radio and television. Her work
of the last four years, however, has
eclipsed the piano, but she intends
to take it up again next year. -
This is not to say that Miss My-
ers intends to allow any relaxatiol,
in her schedule. In addition to her
piano work, she will be studying at'

the Institute of Political Studies of
the University of Paris. And of
course, she has promised to send
a few articles back to The Daily.
Claimed by Honoraries
InĀ£ addition to maintaining an
enviable grade point average, the
senior from Chevy Chase, Md. has
made her mark on the honoraries
of Michigan. Her record includes
Wyvern, Mortarboard, A 1 p h a
Lambda Delta, Pi Sigma Alpha
(political science honorary) and Pi
Lambda Theta (educational hon-
orarity sorority).
She has recently been honored
with the Pi Sigma Alpha award
as the outstanding senior student
in political science.
Always an individualist, Miss
Myers never drinks more than
half a cup of coffee, often tosses a
scarf jauntily over her shoulder,
and hates wearing shoes. Not to
be outdone by the Michigamua
members of The Daily staff, Miss
Myers has even acquired a Triber
name: Monsoon Mouth Myers -
which she politely refrains from
explaining.
Gothic Society
Schedules Films
The Gothic Film Society will
present a series of five films dur-
ing the summer under the general
title of "Men at War."
Three films have definitely been
set fo rshowing. They are "A Walk
in the Sun" of the Second World
War, "La Marseilles," an early
Renoir film, and H. G. Wells'
"Things To Come."

prano, 8:30 p.m. Sun., May 29, in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall, compositions
by Donaudy, Schumann, Wolf, Doni-
zetti, Rachmaninoff, and Debussy. Miss
Smith is a pupil of Frances Greer, and
her recital will be open to the public.
Partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Bachelor of Music degree.
Student Recital. Douglas Stott, bass-
baritone, whose recital was originally
announced for Sun., May 22, will pre-
sent his program at 4:15 p.m. Sun.,
May 29. in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Compositions by Handel, Monteverdi,
Bononcini, Strauss, Faure, Massenet,
Paladilhe, and Williams. Open to the
public, Partial fulfillment of the re-
quirements for the Master of Music
degree. Mr. Stott is a pupil of Chase
Baromeo.
Organ Recital. Betty Jackson, grad-
uate student of organ with Robert
Noehren, will present a recital at 8:30
p.m. Mon., May 30, in Hill Auditorium,
in partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the Master of Music degree.
Works by Bach, Franck, and Messiaen.
Open to the public.
Student Recital. Raymond Haddad,
pianist, will present a program in par-
tial fulfillment of the requirements
for the degree of Bachelor of Music
at 8:30 p.m. Thurs., June 2, in Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall. Compositions by
Bach, Brahms, Mozart, Strawinsky,
Chopin, and Schumann. Open to the
general public. Mr. Haddad is a pupil
of Benning Dexter.
Student Recital. Phyllis Stringham,
organist, 4:15 p.m. Sun., June 5, in
Hill Auditorium, in partial fulfillment
of the requirements for the Master of
Music degree. Compositions of the 12th,
15th and 16th centuries, works by
Sweelinck, Buxtehude, Bach, Sowerby,
and Dupre. Open to the general public.
Miss Stringham is a pupil of Robert
Noehren.
Events Today
Drama Season. The Rainmaker by N.
Richard Nash, May 25-28, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater. 8:30 p.m., matinee Thurs.
and Sat. at 2:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organization Testi-
monial meeting, 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Up-
per Room, Lane Hall.
International Center Tea. Thurs., 4:30-
6:00 p.m. International Center.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
dent Breakfast at Canterbury House
Thurs., May 26, after the 7:00 am. Holy
Communion.
Sailing Club. No meeting Thurs. night.
Rides to Lake for picnic and sailing
will leave Lydia Mendelssohn Thurs. at
1:00, 2:00, 5:30 and 6:00 p.m.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

Mid-Week Vespers in the Student
Center of the Presbyterian Church
sponsored by Westminster Student Fel-
lowship, Thurs., May 26, 5:10-5:35 p.m.
Coming Events
Lane Hall Folk Dances will not meet
Mon., May 30. Folk dancing at Lane
Hall will resume the following Mon.,
June 6 and continue every Mon. even-
ing thereafter until further notice. In-
struction for every dance and begin-
ners will be welcome.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Pic-
nic and swimming party, Fri., May 27,
leaving Canterbury House at 4:30 p.m.
r"; 'r:}i:" ..."v..

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Rackham Building, at 2:00
Chairman, A. W. Bromage.
Student Recital. John Moser,
tone, works by Purcell, Morley,
Arne, Schubert, Wolf, Mozart,
pighi, Poulenc, Dougherty, Van

p.m.I

I
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bari-
Ford,
Res-
Bus-

kirk, Butterworth, and Malotte, at 8:30
p.m, Thurs., May 26, in Rackham As-
sembly Hall. Mr. Mosher is a pupil of
Stanley Kimes, and, the recital will be
given in lieu of a thesis for the Mast-
er of Music degree. Open to the public.
Carillon Recital. Instead of his usual
Thurs. evening recital, Percival Price,
University Carillonneur, will play songs
appropriate to Memorial Day from 6:30-
7:00 p.m. Thurs., May 26, before the
beginning of the Memorial Day parade.
Student Recital by Mary Jo Kohl,
soprano, 8:30 p.m. Fri., May 27, Audi-
torium A, Angell Hall, in partial ful-
fillment of the requirements for the
Master of Music degree. Pupil of Har-
old Haugh, Miss Kohl will sing com-
positions by Gluck, Scarlatti, Bach,
Handel, Wolf, Leoncavallo, Poulenc,
Rachmaninoff, Menotti, Roy, and
Bridge. Open to the public.
Student Recital. Stella Peralta Bau-
mann, soprano, 8:30 p.m., Sat.,even-
ing, May 28, Auditorium A, Angell Hall,
in partial fulfillment of the require-
ments for the Bachelor of Music de-
gree. Works by Monteverdi, Mozart,
Wolf, Puccini, Debussy, Carpenter, and
Sargent. Open to the public. Mrs. Bau-
mann studies voice with Frances Greer.
Student Recital. Laura Smith, so-1

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