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May 24, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-24

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4*,

PAGE I

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.....

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The first railroad to be built in
the United States west of the Alle-
ghenies was located in Michigan.
In 1936 the Erie and Kalamazoo
Railroad completed a 35-mile line
between Toledo-then a Michigan
city-and Adrina.

TUESDAY, MAY 24, 1955
Graduation
Announcements
MORRI LL'S
314 South State

(Continued from Page 4)
Doctoral Examination for Arthur
James Permoda, 'Chemical Engineering;
thesis: "The Adherometer Adhesion of
Calcium Carbonate-Alkyd Coatings on
Steel," Wed., May 25, 3205 East Engi-
neering Bldg., at 3:00 p.m. Chairman,
L. L. Carrick.
Final Examinations. By action of the
Deans' Conference at its meeting April
13, the final examination period for
the present semester will begin Sat.,
May 28, and end Thurs., June 9. Fri.
May 27, on which there will be no
classes, has been designated a study
period.
Zoology Seminar. Oneil M. Banks will
speak on "The Influence of the Ge-
nome in Bacteriophage Host Relation-
ships," and David F. Gruchy on, "The
Breeding System and Distribution of
Tetrakymena pyriformis," Wed., May
25, at 4:00 p.m. in the Natural Science
Auditorium.

Concerts
Student Recital. June Howe, soprano,
8:30 p.m. Wed., May 25, in Auditorium
A, Angell Hall, in partial fulfillment of
the requirements for the Bachelor of
Music degree. She is a pupil of Harold
Haugh. Open to the public. Composi-
tions by Donaudy, Pergolesi, Schubert,
Debussy, Pierne, Chausson, Fourdrain,
Menotti, and Warren.
University of Michigan Symphony and
Wolverine. Bands, under the direction
of Dr. William D. Revelli, will present
an outdoor concert Wed., May 25 at
7:15 p.m., in the area between the Gen-
eral Library and Mason Hall. In case
of rain, it will be cancelled. Program:
"Finale from the New World Sym-
phony" by Dvorak; "Music for a Fes-
tival" by Gordon Jacob; "Finale to the
Fourth Symphony" by Tschaikovsky;
"Smoke Gets in Your 'Eyes" by Kern;
"Nobles of the Mystic Shrine" by Sousa;
and "Bugler's Holiday," a cornet trio
by Leroy Anderson.

Events Today
Drama Season. The Rainmaker by N.
Richard Nash. May 28, Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theater. 8:30 p.m., matinee Thurs.
and Sat. at 2:30 p.m.
Industrial Relations Club meets to
elect officers and discuss next year's
program, Tues., May 24, 7:30 p.m. in
Bus. Ad. student lounge. Talk by a
guest speaker, Those. interested in join-
ing the Club next semester invited,
Fourth Laboratory Playbill presented
by the Department of Speech tonight
at 8:00 p.m. in Barbour Gymnasium.
G. B. Shaw's one-act play, The Ad-
mirable Bashville; scenes from Shakes-
peare's A Midsummer Night's Dream
and scenes from Aristophanes' Lysis-
trata. Open to public, no admission
charge, no reserved seats.
'Detroit in '55." An organization
meeting for those wishing to attend
the Young Republican National Con-.
vention in Detroit from June 15-18,
Wed., May 25, at 4:00 p.m. in Room
3-N of the Union.

4

GARGOYLE
ON SALE
WEDNESDAY

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A SIXTEENTH CENTURY KOREAN INK DRAWING FROM THE COLLECTION OF SCOTT COLE
Cole Collects Oriental Art Pottery

MAY

25

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1932. Made in China, they are
highly prized by the Japanese for
use in their tea ceremonies.
Cole went to Korea during the
recent conflict as aide to Gener-
al Hobart Gay. He spent his free
time hunting for celadons, pots of
a soft green glaze made by the Ko-
reans, and stored his finds in the
back of a Jeep. "However," he said,
"a well-placed shell took care of
both the pots and the Jeep."
Wounded in Korea
Wounded, * Cole was evacuated
to the States. When recovered, he
returned to Japan as assistant to
General Walter Wieble. A greater
amount of free time enabled him
to travel and to visit areas where
pots were available.
After the war, the Japanese gov-
ernment had levied a tax on priv-
ate art collections, many of which1
were broken up and sold. "Since
most of the Japanese collections
were of Chinese art, some beautiful
pieces came to light, which other-
wise might never have been dis-
covered," Cole continued.
One piece which has a great deal
of personal interest for him is at
piece of carved wood from an an-
cient gate, given him by Prince

Takamatsu. Other objects from
Cole's collection are represented in
the Detroit Institute of Arts, and
museums in San Antonio and Se-
attle.
Utility Pots
Cole says his taste "leans to-
ward utility pots - those which
were made for a specific purpose,
such as the Sung tea bowls. They
have meaning that ordinary ob-
jects d'art lack."
Although most of his collection
is of Chinese pots, Cole still has a
fair representation of Japanese
potters such as Hamada, Fenagi,
and Kawaii.
Collecting pots is extremely re-
warding, Cole feels. "Not only do
You get a great deal of pleasure
out of your collection, but from
art you can learn about people,
their needs, and even their
moods."
Since it is difficult to find good
Oriental art in this country, Cole
has started collecting early Taras-
can pots from Mexico,
"The amateur interested in col-
lecting pots can never learn any-
thing by reading about them,"
Cole concluded. "He should go to
all the exhibitions he can, look
at them, and handle them. Hand-
ling pots is very important in
learning to appreciate them. You
can examine them more closely,
and better realize the work that
went into them."
" Clean
* New
" Modern
G1p ' J 'toel
8170 Jackson Rd. Ph. HA 6-8134
3-A ApprovoI

Featuring
Computing Machines
Obscene Cryptograms
Sherlock Holmes
Gayle Greene
Murder
Arson
Vivisection

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Cooperative Buying Plan
Signed by Fraternities

25c

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ganization before we try to meet
these problems," he commented.
Full Cooperation
One possible trouble spot seems
to have disappeared. Without fra-
ternity cooperation, Barber re-'
ported, FBA could not have suc-
ceeded. "So far, we've had full co-
operation."
The present constitution creates
two controlling bodies.
Ultimate control rests with the
Steward's Council, composed of
fraternity stewards or fraternity
members designated to sit on the
council. The Steward's Council
meets once a year and may meet
more often if circumstances de-
mand it.
Board of Directors
Day-to-day business affairs are
in the hands of a Board of Direc-
tors, made up of five alumni, five
students and two ex-officio mem-
bers.
Al Ueker, University personnel
director, Lawrence Thomson, Uni-
versity food buyer, Herbert Wag-
ner, manager of food service and
Graham Conger, University se-
curities analyst now serve as alum-
ni members.
Jack Ryan, '56, Sonny Goldstein,
'55, Hank Aughey, '56NR, and Bob
Knutson, '56, executive vice presi-
dent of IFC are the student mem-
bers.
Barber, as FBA purchasing
agent and William Zerman, rep-
resenting the Dean of Men's of-
fice, are the ex-officio members.

at all drinking fountains!

, ,

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FAMOUS SPEEDWRITING SHORT.
HAND-Uses ABC's. No Symbols - No
Machines. Used in leading offices and Civil
Service. Come, observe, check graduates.
Lowest cost. First lesson FREE. Day of Eve.
New classes now starting.
YOU SAW It IN,
t t, SEVENTEEN * CHARM
RED BOOK " GLAMOUR
~ADEMOISELLE
a nd 60 other
NATIONAL MAGAZINES
Shorthand Schools
In OVER 400 CITES
IN THE U.S., CANADA, CUBA, HAWA
Offe, you these
UFETIME PRIVILEGES FREE I
Not Available to Students of
Any Other Shorthand System1
Lifetime
FREE NATIONWIDE
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE
Laetime

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