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May 08, 1955 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1955-05-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MAY S. 1955

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. MAY 3. 1955

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I

-Daily-Tom McLean
PROF. PERCIVAL PRICE
... .University Carillonneur

Musician Price Has Vast
Audience in Ann Arbor

By MICHAEL BRAUN
Prof. Percival Price of the mu-
sic school has the distinction of be-
ing heard by more people at one
time than any other musician in
Ann Arbor.
His stage is the top floor of Bur-
ton Tower and his concerts are
given four times each week. He
plays the carillon, one of few
such instruments in the country.
On the door to his office is a
sign "Percival Price, University
Carillonneur-Private." The wind
is whistling through the eighth
floor hallway outside his office
but you wait for him to answer the
door because it is fifteen minutes
past the hour.
When he opens the door he ex-
plains that he didn't hear the
knock because of the bells. "Ac-
tually" he explains "an elecerical
mechanism works the bells that
ring the hour. I only play the mu-
sic."
Started in Toronto
Between concerts Prof. Price
teaches students how to play, ar-
range and write music for the car-
rillon. It is an art that he has mas-
tered since he started playing pro-
fessionally in Toronto in 1922.
"I had been studying music with
the intention of playing the organ"
he recalls. "A carillon tower was to
be built in Toronto and I was cho-
sen to go abroad to learn how to
play the instrument."
At that time carillons were nov-
el-on this continent although they
were quite prevalent in Europe, es-
pecially in the Low Countries.
Prof. Price is quick to clear up
the difference between the carillon
and the bell tower. "Most people
think that someone is standing
atop a tower pulling ropes to ring
the bells. Actually that was only
the beginning of the modern caril-

lon. Today the bells are operated
by the musician who may not even
be seated on the same floor with
them."
Ann Arbor in 1939
Prof. Price arrived in Ann Ar-
bor in 1939 to succeed Wilmot
Pratt, rormer carihonneur. He
brought a rich experience of work
at the Houses of Parliament in
Ottawa and the Rockefeller Me-
morial Carrillon to New York with
him.
Prints and etchings of famous
bell towers look down from his
walls. Prof. Price occasionally
glances up at them and reminisces
about the place where he works.
He calls it a "Sober Tower" ex-
plaining that there are are no bats,
ghosts or phantoms.
Sitting in his office (the high-
est in Ann Arbor) Prof. Price de-
claims his "lofty position" and
says that his only hope is to "pro-
vide unique music in unique sur-
roundings."
Music Honors
Toa Be Given
The School of Music will hold an
honors assembly for music stu-
dents at 4:15 p.m. Tuesday in Au-
ditorium A, Angell Hall.
Prof. Marvin J. Eisenberg of the
fine arts department will address
the general assembly on "The Sev-
enth Age of the Artist." Awards
and scholarships for music stu-
dents will be announced.
Prior to the honors assembly, the
Chi chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda,
national honorary music society,
will initiate new members at 3
p.m.

Advertising
Conference
To Be Here
More than 180 persons have reg-
istered for a one-day advertising
conference here Friday on "The
Changing Consumer."
All sessions of the conference
will be open without charge to
students and faculty members.
Opening speakers at the 9:15
a.m. opening session in Rackham
Lecture Hall will be Prof. Samuel
Stouffer, director of the Harvard
University Laboratory of Social
Relations. His topic will be "Social
Changes Affecting the American
Consumer."
Author of Book
Prof. Stouffer is author of a
forthcoming book on "Commu-
nism, Conformity and Civil Liber-
ties."
Also speaking at the morning
session will be Donald B. Arm-
strong, Jr., vice-president and di-
rector of research for McCann-Er-
ickson, Inc. His topic will be "Mar-
ket Planning and the Changing
Consumer."
"Three Campaigns for the New
Consumer" will be presented by
the Ford Motor Co., the Coca Cola
Co., and Ohrbach's.
Luncheon speaker will be Clar-
ence Hatch, Jr., executive vice-
president, D. P. Brother and Co.
In the afternoon session starting
at 2:15 p.m. in Rackham Lecture
Hall, "How Much Can the Con-
sumer Take?" will be discussed by
Arthur A. Porter, vice-president
and director of media for J. Wal-
ter Thompson Co.
Vicary To Speak
James M. Vicary, marketing and
opinion research consultant for
the James M. Vicary Co., will speak
on "The Psychology of Seasons."
"Are We Advertising to Strang-
ers?" will be the topic of a panel
discussion at 4:15 p.m. Chairman
of the panel will be George P.
Richardson, vice-president of J.
Walter Thompson Co., Detroit.
Other panel members will be H.
Kenneth Jones, vice-president and
director of research for Brooke,
Smith, French and Dorrance, Inc.;
Daniel R. Miller, associate profes-
sor of psychology; and Stephen B.
Withey, program director of the
University Survey Research Cen-
ter.
A dinner at the Michigan Union
will close the day's program.
Arthur Upgren, professor of eco-
nomics and Dean of the Dart-
mouth College School of Business
Administration, will speak on "The
Changing Consumer and the'
Changing Economy."
Sponsors of the program are the
department of journalism, College;
of Architecture and Design, and
the School of Business Administra-
tion.
DAILY
OFFICIAL ;
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of th University,
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-3
bility. Publication in it is construc-1
tive notice to all members of the Uni-
versity. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday.) Notice of
lectures, concerts and organizationt
tU

meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
SUNDAY, MAL 8, 1955
Vol. LXV, No. 152
Notices
Undergraduate Honors Convocation.
The annual Convocation recognizing
undergraduate honor students will be
held at 11:00 a.m. Fri., May 13, in Hill
Auditorium. Dr. Harold Willis Dodds,
President of Princeton University, will
speak on the subject "What Is a Uni-
versity?"
Honor students will be excused from
attending their 10 o'clock classes. All
classes, with the exception of clinics
and gradute seminars, will be dis-
missed at 10:45 for the Convocation.
However, seniors may be excused from
clinics and seminars.
Academic costume will be worn by
faculty members, who will robe back-
stage and proceed to their seats on the
stage. Honor students will not wear
caps and gowns. Main floor seats will
be reserved for them and their families
and will be held until 10:45. Doors of
the Auditorium will open at 10:30. The
public is invited.
President and Mrs. Hatcher will hold
open house for students at their home
Wed., May 11, from 4:00 to 6:00 pmm.
Students who have applied for work
or volunteered for.work in any capacity
at Waterman Gymnsium during reg-
istration, June 17-18, are asked to see
their Faculty CounselQrs now in order
to have such Summer Session elec-
tions approved as the School or Col-
lege will allow-before final examina-
tions.
Disciplinary action in cases of student
misconduct: At meetings held on March
16, March 23 and March 30, cases in-
volving fourteen students and one
group were heard by the Joint Judici-
ary Council.. In all cases the action was
approved by the University Sub-Com-
mittee on Discipline.
Violation of state laws and city or-
dinances relating to the purchase, sale
and use of intoxicants:
a. Drinking as a minor and trespass-
ing, charged with disorderly prowl-
ing by city police. One student
fined $25.00, $15.00 suspended in
view of court fine and costs of
$11.85; one student fined $20.00,
$10.00 to be suspended in view of
court fine and costs of $11.85.
b. Drinking as a minor, disturbing
the peace, drunk and disorderly:
One student fined $15.00 and
warned (no court action).
Violation of University automobile
regulations: One student fined $20.00
and requested to remove car from cam-.
pus or obtain storage permit and
warned. (Second violation of University
regulations).
Violation.of University regulations
prohibiting room-to-room soliciting in
residence halls in connection with all-
campus elections: One student fined
$10.00 and warned.
violation of University regulations
regarding illegal admittance to Health
Service: One student fined $10.00 and
warned for entering room; one student
warned for entertaining unchaperoned
male student in Health Service after
visiting hours.
violation of University regulations
pertaining to drinking in student resi-
dences and also driving after drinking
and driving in violation of University
automobile regulations: One student
fined $25.00, $15.00 to be suspended in
view of court fine and costs of $31.85,
and warned severely.
Violation of University regulations
concerning presence of women in men's
residences: One student fined $20.00
(president of the house) and warned;
one student fined $15.00 (ex-president
of the house) and warned; two students
fined $10.00 and warned (second viola-
tion of University regulations); two stu-
dents fined $5.00 and warned.
Group case:
Violation of University regulations in
that intoxicants were consumed in stu-
dent quarters and that women were
entertained within the house after the
stated closing hour. Group fined $500.00
and warned.
A U.S. Air Force Reserve Recruiting
Team will be at the Michigan Union
Room 3g on Tues. May 10, from 9 a.m.
to 5 p.m., for the purpose of interview-
ing all Veterans and non-prior Service-
men interested in joining the 439th
Fighter Bomber Wing (Reserve), which
trains one weekend each month at Sel-
fridge Air Force Base, Mt. Clemens,
Mich.
Beginning Tues., May 10, the follow-
ing School Representatives will be at
the Bureau of Appointments for in-
terviews:
Tues., May 10
Fowerville, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
H.S. English; Girl's Physical Education:
Jr. High English-Social Studies; 7th
Grade Mathematics-Socig Studies; Ele-

mentary Music-Art combination; Fourth
Grade.
Wed., May 11
Allen Park, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
Speech Correction; Fourth; Third
Grade.
St. Joseph, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
H.S. Girl's Physical Education; H.S. Li-
brarian; Kindergarten; First Grade; Sec-
ond Grade; Third Grade; Fifth Grade;
Sixth Grade; Seventh Grade.
Thurs., May 12
Walled Lake, Michigan - Teacher
Needs: Early and Later Elementary.

Charlevoix, Michigan-Teacher Needs:
First Grade; English-Speech.
For appointments or additional infor-
mation contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3528 Administration Bldg., NO
3-1511, Ext. 489.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Camp Interiken of the Pines, Eagle
River, Wis., requests applications from
mle candidates for the following coun-
selor positions: tennis, handicraft, dra-
matics, etc.; a riding instructor. This is
a boys camp with a season from June
25-Aug. 25. Contact Mr. Joseph Kupci-
net, Dir., 2737 Catalpa, Chicago 25, Illi-
nois. For further information concern-
ing Camp Interlaken call Phil Douglis,
NO 3-3307.
Ford Motor Company, Automotive
Standard Lab., Livonia, Mich. requests
applications from women candidates in-
terested in straight typing jobs for the
summer. Salary is $234.00 per month.
Contact Mr. Ben Mirkin, Detroit, KEN-
WOOD 3-2000, Ext. 342 immediately.
SUMMER PLACEMENT
INTERVIEWING REQUESTS:
Interlocken Camp, Mich, has openings
for single male General Counselors,
preferable with Ph. Ed. background and
at least 20 years old (but wll consider
younger candidates.) There is an open-
ing for an experienced Crafts & Cabin
counselor to teach crats to younger
boys division; an assistant at the hotel
desk (male); two Registered Nurses with
a salary of $250, plus room & board for
the eight week season. There is also
an opening for a FULL TIME SECRE-
TARY (shorthand & typing). This po-
sition involves three months of duty at
Interiocken (salary in addition to room
& board while at Interlochen) and nine
months, from Sept. to May, at 303 South
State Street, Ann Arbor. If interested
in any of these positions contact Mr.
Ray Williams for an appointment to
be interviewed at NO 8-7616 during the
day. There is also an opening for a re-
liable station wagon driver.
Camp Charlevoix, .boys camp in
Northern Michigan will interview male
candidates for all types of counselor
positions on May 10 from 1:00 p.m. to
5:00 p.m. and on My 11 from 9:00 a.m.
to 12 noon, 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Candi-
dates should be at least 19 years old.
The season is from June 18 to Aug.
20. Contact the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, NO 3-1511, Ext. 2614 to make an
appointment to be interviewed by Mr.
Ken Smith at the Michigan Union,
Lectures
Astronomical Lectures. "Problems of
Spectral Classification and Galactic
Structure" will be discussed in a series
of lectures by Dr. W. W. Morgan of the
Yerkes Observatory as follows: Tns.,
May 10, 1:00 p.m., Thurs., May 12, 1:00
p.m., and Fri., May 13, 10:00 a.m. at
the Observatory.
Academic Notices
Doctoral Examination for Arthur Kal-
m e n Bierman; Philosophy; thesis:
"PraIl's Aesthetics," Mon., May 9, 2214
Angell Hall, at 3:15 p.m. Chairman, C.
L. Stevenson.
Doctoral Examination for Maybelle
Tinkle, Education; thesis: "A Survey of
Health and Physical Education Pro-
grams in the Public Secondary Schools
of Texas by Means of the LaPorte Score
Card," Mon., May 9, Room 3N, Michigan
Union, at 2:00 p.m. Chairman, P. A.
Hunsicker.
Detoral Examination for Cyrus Jewett
Sharer, Geography; thesis: "The Popu-
lation Growth of the Bahama Isnds,"
Mon., May 9, 210 Angell Hall, at 3:30
p.m. Chairman, S. D. Dodge.
Doctoral Examintion for Douglas Gene
Arner, Philosophy; thesis; "Conscious-
ness and Reality," Mon., May 9, 2214
Angell Hall, at 9:00 s.m. Chairman,
William Frankena.
Doctoral Examination for Susan Moore
Ervin, Social Psychology; thesis: "The
Verbal Behavior of Bilinguals: The Ef-
fect of Language of Report upon the
Thematic Apperception Test Stories of
(Continued on Pag 4)

LOST AND FOUND

LOST-Watch-Silver with four dia-
monds. Black cord band. Reward. Call
NO 2-0018, ask for Henrietta. )113A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$$.88. Sox
39c, shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
SWEATERS to formals, size 9 to 11.
Call NO 3-8153. )301B
25' HOUSETRAILER. Completely furn-
ished. Must sacrifice. NO 5-2902. )262B
Mother's Day Gifts from $1
including free gift wrapping.
VAN DYKE'S GIFTS
East Liberty between 4th and
5th Avenues )265B
R.O.T.C. Army Captain's Uniforms.
Everything-very cheap. Call NO
8-6481, Saturday or forenoons. )270B
FOR SALE-Two high-fidelity speakers:
Jensen 12" co-axial (list $55.00 for
$35.00. Electro-voice 12" extended
range SP-12B (list $30.00) for $20.00.
Both in perfect condition. Gordon
Mumma, 214 S. Thayer, Apt. 2, NO
3-3007. )271B
FOR RENT
FOUR ROOM APARTMENT, bath and
sunporch. Unfurnished, between med-
ical school and hospital. $90. Call NO
2-9665. ) 81D
APARTMENT suitable for two people.
Available for summer or for indefi-
nite time thereafter. Close to cam-
pus. Call NO 3-3258 after 5:30 P.M.
)82D
CAMPUS-Apartments for men. Furn-
ished. Private baths. Available June.
$125 for 3. $140 for 4 men. Phone
NO 3-8454 after 1 P.M. )31C
LARGE sixteen room house for lease
or rent on Oakland and Monroe. Furn-
ished, good condition. NO 2-5184. )32C
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH. Campus Tour-
ist Homes. 518 E. William. Student
rooms also available. NO 3-8454. )66D
ROOMING HOUSE--Furnished. Univer-
sity approved. Available at the end
of the term. Phone NO 2-0567 be-
tween 10 and 9. )73D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male students-
summer and fall, half block from
campus. Cooking privileges, 417E.
Liberty. )83D
ORPHEUTM

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 2-3241
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
11:00 A.M. Saturday

FOR RENT
CLEAN, AIRY accommodations for
summer for 5 boys; 2 doubles, 1 sin-
gle. Everything furnished, including
refrigerator and use of large sun
porch. Campus location. Phone NO 8-
7391; would like to have reservations
made as early as possible. )28D
ROOM AND BOARD
SUMMER SESSION roomers and/or
boarders wanted. Rent $35 for eight
weeks, board $112.80 with refunds for
uneaten meals. Call Jim Burnett, NO
2-9431. )22E
HELP WANTED
FULL OR PART-TIME male cab driver.
Apply A.A. Yellow and Checker Cab
Co. 113 S. Ashley, Phone NO 8-9382.
)64H
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Ine
instruments. Accessories. Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
TYPIST - Specialty thesis with an
Elite typewriter. 21 inch carriage. Ref-
erences. Call Saline 665J. Can often
pick up and deliver materials.
RADIO - PHONO - TV
Service and Sales
Free Pick-Up and Delivery
Fast Service - Reasonable Rates
Telefunken HI-FI AM-FM Radio
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV
1217 S. University Phone NO 8-7942
1% Blocks East of East Eng. )261B
USED CARS
1938 CHEVROLET SEDAN. Excellent
transportation. $75. Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc., 607 Detroit Street, NO
8-8141. )28N
1951 BUICK CONVERTIBLE. Dynaflow.
Power seats and windows, whitewall
tires. Radio and heater. Phone NO
2-0224. )38N
1948 FORD V-8. 2-door. Very good con-
dition. Best offer. Phone NO 2-8603
evenings. )44N
1950 OLDSMOBILE club coupe. 88. Blue.
Radio and heater. One owner. Sharp.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222' W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )49N
1954 NASH RAMBLER. Two-door, radio
and heater. 11,000 actual miles. Like
new. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )48N

THE
ECONOMIC
APPROACH

eq

IINEIiDr

USED CARS
1953 OLDSMOBILE Hard-top. Low mile..
age. Two-tone blue. Radio and beater:
Power brakes. Real nice. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. 500
1941 PLYMOUTH club coupe, $100.
Radio and heater. Call NO 3-0521,
ext. 287 from 7:00-7:30 P.M. )51N
ALTERATIONS
ALTERATIONS on ladies garments.
Prompt service. Call NO 2-2678 A.
Graves. )12J

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In 1847, legislators wrangled for
months in Detroit to choose Michi-
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ster suggested "The Township of
Lansing," a wilderness with a saw-
mill and one log house. To break
the legislative deadlock, tired law-
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