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May 04, 1955 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-04

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PAGE s

T MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1953

FAGE SiX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MAY 4, 1955

IN MARBLE CASE:
Map of North Campus Gift of Class of '54
. It

By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
'Future Ann Arbor visitors will
have no difficulty locating North
Campus, thanks to the graduat-
ing class of 1954.
'A large marble case which will
hold a map of North Campus has
been erected at the corner of N.
University and State St. As yet,
there is no definite date set for
placing the map in the case.
When asked what she thought of
the 1954 class gift, one bewildered
tuetqueried, "You mean the
television set .. ."
Other student opinions register-
ed diverse attitudes. "Why didn't
they get Michaelangelo's 'David'
instead," snapped Joan Cooper,
'54. "It's perfectly adorable," Joe
Frisinger, '56, said.
Perpetuates Memory
James Walters, '55E, thoroughly
approved of the gift. "It does per-
petuate the memory of the class
and is of some benfit to the 'cam-
pus as a whole," he said.
"We need a map of the whole
campus - not just North Cam-
pus," JoAnn Clark, '56, asserted.
"Buy a bus-not a map," Judy
Gregory, '56, muttered.
"I honestly have never heard of
anything more useless in my life,"
Diane Wengarden, '57, said.
Other students registered en-
thusiastic application. "Simply
fabulous" expressed Nick Kouch-
oukos', '58, approval. "Real crazy
man, real crazy," added Glen
Carlson, '57.
Confusing
"This will confuse freshmen
more than ever," Ann Sterling,
'57, said.
"For one thing, I don't really
see why they have it," Marie
Bourbonnais, '57, said in a puzzled
tone. "It's more distinctive than a
drinking fountain, but it doesn't
have neon lighting."
Workmen have just recently
completed construction of the
marble case. Work began late last
Hopwood Talk
To Be Given
By M~aLesh
Archibald MacLeish will give the
annual Hopwod Writing Contest
lecture at 4:15 p.m. Thursday, May
19.
MacLeish, distinguished Ameri-
can poet and professor at Harvard
University will speak at Rackham
Lecture Hall. He will discuss con-
temporary poetry under the topic,
"Why Can't They Say What They
Mean?"
The Hopwood Contest is open to
all University students. Cash prizes
for creative writing in drama, es-
say, poetry and fiction are award-
ed.
The awards will be presented
after the lecture by Prof.Arno L.
Bader of the English department
and chairman of the Hopwood
Committee.
"Conquistador," a long poem by
MacLeish won a Plitzer Prize in
1932. In 1953 he was again a reci-
pient of a Pulitzer Prize and of
the Bollingen prize in poetry.
Group Leaders
Men students who wish to
sign up as group leaders during
orientation week may do so in
the student offices of the Un-
ion from 3-5 p.m. daily, start-
ing today.
Brown To Talk
At Rackham
George Granger Brown, Dean of
the College of Engineering, will

deliver the annual Henry Russel
lecture at 4:15 p.m. today in Ra ,-
ham Amphitheater.
The lecture program was estab-
lishqi as part of a project, under
the request of the late Henry Rus-
sel, 73 Detroit.
Dean Brown's lecture is titled,
"Fuure Sources of -'cwer."

Peace Visit
To Russia
Called Off
NEW YORK (P)-Ten veterans
of the American-Soviet meeting at
the Elbe didn't leave last night
for Moscow and a reunion with
their Russian counterparts.
They didn't have enough money
to get to Paris.
Joseph Polowsky of Chicago,
head of the American Veterans of
the Elbe River Linkup, appealed
for funds through reporters and
newsreel cameras.
He said he was determined to
make the trip, even if others in
the group had to drop out. The
reunion was set for May 9. The
10th anniversary of the Elbe meet-
ing was April 25.
The 10 members have U.S. pass-
ports and visas for the Soviet Un-
ion. Russia has promised plane
transportation between Paris and
Moscow. The problem was to get
to Paris.
The group had reservations on
a Trans World Airlines flight to
Paris that left at 9 p.m. Hours be-
fore plane tine, it was apparent
they weren't going to be able to
raise the money.
"We thought we had a commit-
ment for the money but it didn't
materialize," Polowsky said.
TWA suggested they could go
on a pay-later basis, but some of
the group didn't have enough for
the 10 per cent down payment.

The Greatofe Hour
If the University student knows anything, he knows how to
make conversation over a cup of coffee.
Atth peak social hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. studejits drift
across campus to their favorite coffee spots. Music students migrate
to "The Betsy," the Greeks congregate to Mary Lee's, and the Pub-
:;;: :::.,. + lications crowd distributes themselves behind ..... the counter at "Red's."
}}::.-: %iv : :i;}}:}}}: }:.{}:.: }}: }i}'"Bridge}}.fanatics. \.cut...classes Bidgofangets at gamee tgoingagadownstairsstaisin
the League, and the Juke box is jumping at the Parrot. The fine
art of the coffee date is in full swing.
xh ,.".?i.xvv}.v . ":".x: v:.:.:v;....:, .. UT..: :nThe coffee break is more than a diversion-it's a institution.
Students are as faithful to the coffee convention as the :ngish to
their afternoon tea.' Even the professors gather in the coffee room
high in Haven Hall.
Some of the students are "social drinkers." They can't stand
coffee, they never touched the stuff before they came to college, and
they gulp it down quickly with generous supplies of cream and sugar.
Others just like something to slosh around in a cup, and coffee
is the standard order.
But the real devotee always takes his black, can't talk civily be-
fore he's had his morning brew, and speaks authoritatively on the
best coffee places in town.
Coffee in Ann Arbor performs two notable services. One is the
:.;:t moral support the beverage gives final-frantic students, the other
Sis the time-honored custom of the coffee date.
''' = .". >:+r. ;: :. ...xv..j in the last few weeks of the semester, coffee takes on a ritus}-
:} istic importance. Like the plaid hats and English coins that stil-
dents take to exams, coffee is endowed with certain mystical powers
{+: ; that help in passing bluebooks. Coffee-drinking keeps some students
} :: :>;>::: ;:::>x::xi<}:. "'' .. '.i _...>.;}.} .::ie ' awake, but is usually just habit.
wtT} : :: }u It is with the delicate procedure of the blind date that coffee
really becomes essential. The boy with a pledge formal on his hands
and no girl prefers to have a few coffee dates under his belt before
:}:ytrusting his fraternity brother's recommendation.
The coffee zealots tend to look on tea-drinkers as infidels to
} fthe true belief. Those of the tea persuasion may be observing the
form of the coffee hour, they say, but are missing one of the finer
things of life.
HIGH TEA IN ANN ARBOR With the coming of spring, some of the fringe drinkers desert
to the lemonade and ice-cream ranks. The sale of popsicles goes up,
and soda straws replace the coffee cups. But the addicts remain true
to their principles, and pass the ice-cream stands with scorn.

(
I

CAMPUS INSTITUTION:

, +1

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
1954 CLASS GIFT-NOT A TV SET

year, but has been hampered by Angell Hall Building, where elec-
snow and ice during the winter trical outlets were available.
season. The case will provide an acces-,
At night, the case is lighted by sible guide to North Campus. As
indirect lighting. Ditches were dug new buildings are added, the map
from the corner of the campus to will be brought up to date.

TEACHERS GET WORD:
Education Conference Slated Here

-1,h point of the School of Edu-
ra fon's 75th anniversary observ-
ance will be the 25th annual con-
ference on teacher education.
The conference will be held in
the Union May 12.
It will center around discussion
of the next 25 years in teacher
education, with attention given
also to the history of the move-
ment.
Magee To Speak
At 10 a.m. Robert Magee of
Wayne University will opeak to a
general session meeting on "Per-
sistence ir. the Teaching Profes-
sion."
Prof. William C. Morse and Prof.
W. Robert Dixon, of the School of
8ducation, will talk on "A Study
of Empathy in Teaching: Student
Teachers and Pupils."
Speaker at the 12:15 Union
luncheon will be Maurice Seay, di-
rector of the educational division
of the W. K. Kellogg Foundation.
His topic will be "The Significance

of the Community School Concept
for Teacher Education."
The afternoon session will fea-
ture a panel discussion entitled
"The Preparation and Status of
College Teachers of Education in
Miehigan."
At 4 p.m., conf rees will attend
the eth annual School of Educa-
tton Convocation in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, at which President
Harlan H. Hatcher will preside.

Fo. owing the presentation of
ach'e'ement awaids to honored
students, David D. Henry, presi-
dent-e'ect of the University of Il-
linois, will speak.
At the dinner following the con-
vocation Dean Willard C. Olson, of
the School of Education, will in-
troduce past and present leaders
of educational organizations of the
state, who will be guests at the
conference.

I

Give SmtigDifferent0
ON MOTHER'S DAYUU
Large assortment of GIFTS
to select from
0 INDIA ART SHOP
3 30 MAYNARD STREETn
FOLLETT'S need
COLLEGE TEXTBOOKS
Sell the textbooks you are no longer using before new
editions and newer books decrease their value.
SELL THEM NOW- SELL THEM FOR CASH
Sell them at
FO LLETT'S
State Street at N. University
SOMETHING FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
-in the Christian Science Monitor

LEARNING T1lE TRADE
DAILY,
PHOTO
F EATU RE
Story by
DEBRA DURCHSLAG
Pictures by
DICK GASKILL

THREE NO TRUMP--AND WHO CARES ABOUT BOTANY '

A

See the SPECIAL DISPLAY of this
International Daily Newspaper
at 211 E. Washington Street
Thursday, Friday, Saturday, May 5, 6, 7 -
1 1 :00 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.

t_ ___

AIR CONDITIONED
looks cooler -
is cooler!
Light but sturdy,
cooler and drier,
sweet and satisfying
'AIUSTOMATIC'
patemed screw bit)
DE LUXE
gaush bit) $1.*95 ;

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savings

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A TIRED GIRL ... AFTERNOON GOSSIP ... AND EARNEST TABLE TALK OVER COFFEE

ON
off

FOREST
South U.

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Coats, Suits, orig. 29.95 t
Dr Ses orig. 14.95 to 3
Sizes.7-15 10-44 12-24%/

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39.95

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