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May 01, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

PAGE SUC

TIC MCMGAN MATEY

SUNDAY'. MAY 1- DAN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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NEAR PRE-WAR LEVEL:
Recent German Economy Boom. Noted

University TV Office
Completes Fourth Year

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The University's TV Office now
has behind it four years of tele-
casting.
Until last spring, when kine-
scope facilities were installed at
the Office, its ',TV Hour" series
was broadcast live from WWJ-TV,
Detroit. Every Sunday morning
faculty and TV staff members
would gather up props and troop
into Detroit for the 1 p.m. show.
This necessitated an estimated 25,-
000 miles of travel per year.
Now Done Here
Now this show, along with sev-
eral others, is kinescoped at the
Office and sent by mail, train and
bicycle to TV stations all over the
state.
Kinescope facilities have en-
abled the Office to become an ac-
tive production center which de-
velops educational programs now
viewed over eight commercial sta-
tions by a million people per week.
The "TV Hour," now in its fifth
year, has offered a total of 27 tele-
courses on such varied subjects as
child psychology, mathematics,
physics, photography, medicine,
personal finances, geology, politi-
cal science, parliamentary pro-
cedure, speech and engineering,
Offered for non-credit home study,
the courses had an enrollment of
11,000 during their first four years.
Other 'U' Programs
Besides the "TV Hour," the Uni-
versity presents the 15-minute
"Michigan Report" and the 30-
Annual Wage
To Be Debated
Sigma Rho Tau, National Engi-
neering Speaking Society, will de-
bate on the guaranteed annual
wage at 1:30 p.m. today in Rms.
3K and 3L of the Union.
Opposition to the position "Re-
solved: The automobile manufac-
turers should adopt a guaranteed
annual wage" will be the Detroit
Institute of Technology and Uni-
versity of Detroit.
This debate is a continuation of
several discussions based on this
timely topic in which Sigma Rho
Tau has participated this semes-
ter.
The debate should be of special
interest to students planning to
enter the Cooley Memorial Essay
Contest of the Engineering School,
since the topic of the essay is "The
Guaranteed Annual Wage."

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m i n u t e "Understanding Our
World."
Prof. Garnet R. Garrison, direc-
tor of TV here, sums up the formu-
la for a successful educational TV
formula as "good teaching plus
preparation."
"The viewing audience should be
as quicl to decry slipshod produc-
tions, superficial treatment of con-
tent and poorly conceived pro-
grams as for programs developed
and presented by commercial sta-
tions, advertisers and networks,"
he said.
Adjustment Needed
He continued, "If ETV is to be
a real force for public good, its
producers must realize that they
cannot transfer the classroom to
the TV studio without considerable
adjustment . . . adjustment of
academic content to a visual me-
dium."
Since an instructor or guest
speaker on the "TV Hour" never
uses a script, he is so thoroughly
rehearsed that he knows what sub-
ject matter he must cover and
how much time he has to cover it.
Before he goes on the air, he
has several conferences with the
content editor, the producer-di-
rector and the graphics supervi-
sor. Movies, sketches, charts, maps,
photographs, animate and inani-
mate models and short dramas are
a few of the visual aids used to in-
crease the effectiveness of the
shows.
Numerous Workers
Producing these kinescopes de-
mands the full-time work of two
producer-directors, a content edi-
tor, three engineers, a graphics su-
pervisor and thirty part - time
w o r k e r s, including announcers,
cameramen, writers, staging as-
sistants, floor managers and engi-
neers.
Future plans include the build-
ing of the University's own trans-
mitter facilities on Channel 26, re-
served by the Federal Communi-
cations Commission for non-com-
mercial telecasting in Ann Arbor.
Up until that time, and even after-
wards, however, the TV Office in-
tends to keep producing kinescopes
for its state-wide film network.
KNIT LONG SOCKS
FOR YOUR
BERMUDA SHORTS!
Pattern Books and Yarns here
in mens' and womens' styles.
Will help you make the sock.
ofter you buy yarn.
COLONIAL
YARN SHOP
324 E. Liberty NO 2-7920
Open 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
Closed Saturday

Petitions
Petitions are available for
manager of the Student Book
Exchange and membership on
the Cinema Guild Board, Uni-
versity Housing Study Com-
mittee and the Driving Study
Committee.
Petitions may be obtained in
the Office of Student Affairs,
1020 Administration Bldg., and
are due by 5 p.m. May 2.
NAS Elects
SProf esor
As Member
Prof. George E. Uhlenbeck, of
the physics department has been
elected to membership in the Na-
tional Academy of Science..
The Academy is an organiation
of 50 American scientists who have
made "outstanding original contri-
butions to the natural sciences."
Prof. Uhlenbeck is one of 30
men selected this week for mem-
bership in the Academy. He is on
leave of absence this semester in
the Netherlands, where he holds
a visiting lectureship at the In-
stitute for Theoretical Physics at
Leiden.
He is known as the co-discover-
er of electron spin, the movement
of "satellite" particles located out-
stide the nuclei of atoms. An-
nounced in 1925, his finding has
been described as "one of the more
outstanding and far-reaching dis-
coveries in modern physics," and
as "a cornerstone of modern atom-
ic theory."
Prof. Uhlenbeck was born in Ba-
tavia, Netherlands East Indies, and
was educated in the Netherlands.

Season tickets for the Drama
Season will go on sale at the Lydia
Mendelssohn box office at 10 a.m.
tomorrow.
Tickets for individual perform-
ances will go on sale Friday. The
box office will be open from 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily except Sun-
days.
Supporting Casts Set
Among the new members of the
supporting casts for the plays is
Larry Gates. He will play opposite
Faye Emerson in S. N. Behrman's
"Biography," the fourth play of
the Season, running May 30 to
June 4.
Gates appeared most recently on
Broadway as the impulsive psy-
chiatrist in "Teahouse of the Aug-
ust Moon." He also was seen in
"Bell, Book and Candle" and "The
Love of Four Colonels."
Also set for the comedy are Olga
Fabian and Charles Cooper. Coop-
er had the lead opposite Julie Har-
ris in the touring company of "I
Am a Camera."
The first play of the five week
Season is "The Southwest Corn-
er," starring Eva Le Gallienne,
Enid Markey and Parker Fennelly.
Fennelly voiced the famous Titus
Moody of Fred Allen's "Allen's Al-
ley." Supporting roles will be done
by Ray Boyle, Judith Hunter, Tru-
man Smith and Evelyn Gregory.
Monarchs in Drama
Helen Hayes will star in the sec-
ond production, "Gentlemen, the
Queens," as she portrays four fam-
ous rulers via the drama: Shaw's
"Catherine, the Great," Anderson's
"Mary of Scotland," Shakespeare's

AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN:
Drama Season Ticket
Sale Begins Tomorrow

Laurent's "The Time of the Cuc-
koo." Others in the cast will be
Stiano Braggiotti, Cooper, Miss
Hunter, Smith and Jane Rose.
Casting for Nash's "The Rain-
maker" has not been completed
yet. This play will run the week of
May 16.

"Lady Macbeth," and Housman's
''Victoria Regina."'
Supporting Miss Hayes in her
various courts will be Philip Bour-
neuf, Edith Meiser, Boyle, Alex-
ander Clark. Frances Tannehill
and Miss Hunter.
The final production stars Val-
erie Bettis and Lydia St. Clair in

LARRY GATES
..in "Biography"

5

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'38 48'~~ 501 '52 I'53 IS54I55
CRUDE STEEL PRODUCTION
.MILLIONS OF TONS

By MAX HARRELSON
Associated Press Staff Writer
The West Germany scheduled to
make her grand entrance into the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion as a sovereign state early this
month is, politically speaking, only
half a nation.
Despite hopes for early reunifi-
cation stirred in Germany by the
Russian concessions on a treaty
and an end of occupation in neigh-
boring Austria, observers see little
chance the Soviets will abandon
their position in East Germany.
But even without the 16 million
persons and the natural resources
imprisoned behind the Iron Cur-
tain, the German Federal Repub-
lic now is one of the firmest pil-
lars supporting the European eco-
nomy.
Vast Defense Production Capacity
Although NATO treaty provi-
sions provide that she refrain from
the manufacture of heavy arma-
ments, she has a vast capacity for
defense production.
The best index of her potential
is her zooming output of steel, ma-
chinery and automobiles. While
the whole economy of Western
Germany is enjoying an amazing
boom, it is especially strong in
these fields.
As the charts on the accom-
panying map illustrate, West Ger-
many now is producing far more

cars than did undivided Germany
before the war. The 518,160 pas-
senger vehicles she manufactured
last year' put her in third place in
world automobile production, less
than 80,000 cars behind Britain's
594,840.
In the production of crude steel,
West Germany at present is not
quite matching the output of the
entire Reich before the war, but is
rapidly approaching that figure.
And this is being accomplished
without the immensely valuable
Saar basin, which alone turns out
2%/ million tons per year.
Crude Steel Production
Britain now is the only nation of
Western Europe producing more
crude steel- than West Germany
and the gap between them is rap-
idly closing. Germany produced
15,692,400 tons in 1954 to Britain's
16,945,200. There is a possibility
West Germany might eclipse Bri-
tain this year. Her production fig-
ure for January was higher by 71,-
000 tons.
Measuring German recovery in
more general terms, a recent Uni-
ted Nations report said Western
Germany's production of invest-
ment goods in 1954 was 18 per cent
higher than in 1953 and almost
four times as large as in 1948.
This evidence of Germany's re-
surgence is heartening to those
looking for a robust ally in Eur-

ope, but it portends trouble for
others. Some European countries
are worried at the moment because
the increasing exports from West-
ern Germany are becoming an im-
portant competitive factor in the
world market. The chart shows
how they have grown on an aver-
age of more than one-half billion
dollars a year since 1951.
Chancellor Konrad Adenauer ac-
knowledged recently that such
fears had been expressed to him.
Adenauer stated there was no
cause for worry.

-:
t Restaurant and Pizzeria
PIZZA IS OUR SPECIALTY
1204 South University
10:30 A.M. to 11 P.M. Closed Saturdays

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It's YOUR day.
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RIGHT -is a dual purpose costume suit of silk and
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