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April 29, 1955 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-29

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- FRT1IAV- APDit',. 955Q' H IHEA lIL A ETRES WS5~~A~a 54 d .~

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

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Wolverine

Nine

Edges

Irish,

2-

1,

ct

South Bend

"-

Drake, Penn Relays This
Give Trackmen Stiff Com

Weekend

By BILL GRANSE
"We're going to have to beat
'UCLA, Notre Dame, and Oklahoma
A&M," Assistant Track Coach El-
mer Swanson observed when com-
menting o n t h e Wolverines'
chances in the Drake Relays this
r Friday and Saturday in Des
Moines, Iowa.
The Oklahoma A&M contingent
is favored to cop most of the
events, although competition is
based on individual showings and
not on team performances. The

Aggies are favored in
medley, the four-mile
the broad jump.

the sprint
relay, and

Michigan is sending athletes to
Iowa and also to Philadelphia, Pa.,
to compete in the Drake and Penn
relays respectively. Track stars
from all over the country will be
competing against the Wolverines
in these events.
Santee To Run Mile
The Drake Relays will be high-
lighted by the famous Wes Santee

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WITH PHIL DOUGLIS

petition
ex-University of Kansas star, run-
ning in the open mile.
The greatest worry to the Wol-
verines will be Northwestern's
Jim Golliday, running in the 100-
yard dash, who shares the world's
record for the 100 meters. John~
Johnson will represent Michigan
in this event n the qualifying
round which will be held today.
Ron Wallingford will run in the
open two mile run, while Swanson
is sending Dan Walter, Hobe
Jones, John Moule and Pete Gray
to perform in the two mile relay
on Saturday. Swanson anticipates
trouble from Indiana, winner of
this event in the Ohio Relays.
Indiana will be without the
services of distance star Jim Lam-
bert, who is suffering from a vi-
rus infection. However, Len Robin-
son, Hoosier anchorman, who
missed the Ohio Relays because of
an injured leg, expects to partici-
pate in the meet.
Kramer, Booth Miss Trip
Both Ron Kramer and Mark
Booth will miss the trip because of
injuries. Kramer has a sore hand
which would bother him in the
field events. Booth has been lame
for several weeks.
Roosevelt Grier, of Penn State,
who defeated Dave Owen in the
shot put at Ohio, will be the man
for Owen to beat in the Penn Re-
lays.
Laird, Sloan, Dave Hessler, Dick
Flodin, and Grant Scruggs will run
for the Wolverines in the 880-yard
qualifying relay at Penn today,

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Eaddy's Eighth Inning Hit Scrimmage
Climaxes Tight Mound Duel Highlights
Special to The Daily
Michigan's baseball team dis- Ferrelli started for Michigani
played fine pitching depth once and pitched good ball until he
again yesterday, as it used three tired in the sixth. In this frame,
pitchers to gain a four-hit, 2-1 Jim Cusack, the Irish's clean-up Spring football practice at Fer-
victory over Notre Dame at South hitter, banged out a double, and ry Field yesterday was highlighted
Bend, Ind. then scored on a solid single by by the season's hottest weather
Hurlers Mark Ferrelli, Dick Pe- Bill Teschke. Up to this inning, and an intensive hour-and-one-
terjohn, and Jim Clark, combined Ferrelli had giv enu ne h half scrimmage.
Peterjohn Relieves Concentrating mostly on run-
Coach Ray Fisher then called on g
ning plays out of the T-formation
Twelfth Will lefty Dick Peterjohn to pitch, and with an unbalanced line, the Wol-
NOTRE DAME after he set down the side in order verine offense was sparked by
AB R H E in the seventh, Jim Clark came sharp blocking that opened up
Johnson.AB ... .... 4 Ea 0 on to hold the Irish scoreless foraihapsorsng dyh acksnJim
Nestor, f.......... 4 0 0athe final two stanzas. iPwideogps for yanddbacks Jim
Hurley, 2b.......... 3 0 1 1 Eaddy assumed the familiar role
Custack, lb ....... 4 1 1 0 of hitting hero once again, as he non.
Teschke, rf......... 4 0 1 0 accounted for both of Michigan's The high-stepping Pace again
O'Drobinak, iff..... 4 0 1 runs in the eighth inning. Moby seemed to be the center of the
Carido, k is....... 0 3 Benedict led off the inning by be- explosive running attack, as he
Bunker, p.........2 0 0 a ing hit with a, pitched ball. Bruce continued his steady improvement
'- -- --- Fox gained first on an error by of the conditioning spring work-
TOTALS .........31 1 4 1 the Irish second baseman, and outs. After a 30-yard dash by the
MICHIGAN Captain Dan Cline walked. This Arkansas halfback F r e s h m a n
ABH II E set the stage for Eaddy's bases- Coach Wally Weber blurted out
Benedict, ss .......2 1 0 1iloaded single scoring Benedict and quite aptly, "Jet propulsion . .
Fox, cf .,.......4 1 1 0 . Fox. jet propulsion."
Cline, rf...........1 0 1 0 The unsung hero of yesterday's Competition Keen
Eaddy, 3b..........4 0 1 0 game was Notre Dame pitcher The primarily 6-2-2-1 defense
Tippery, b....4 0 a) 0
Brano4 Dick Bunker. Bunker worked the and line play, however, told a
Ronan, lb ......... 2 0 0 0 full nine innings, giving up three good deal of yesterday's story
Szalwinski, c....... 3 0 a 0 hits and striking out nine. How- Competition for positions next fall
Snider ............. 2 0 0 0 I ever, wildness proved to be his will be keen. Noted improved play
Ferrelli, p..........2 0 0 0 downfall as eight Michigan run- at tackle by Mary Nyren, Chic
Peterjohn,p.......00 0 ners reached base via base on balls. Jung, and Jim Davies should add
Clark..............0 08 0 Two new faces appeared in depth in this department.
TOTALS.........28 2 3 1 Michigan's starting lineup. Veter- The scrimmage, itself, was mark-
an Frank Ronan was at first base ed by continual shifting of line-
Notre Dame 000 001 000-1 4 1 replacing Jim Vukovich, and Tony men by Line Coach Jack Blott and
Michigan 000 000 020-2 3 1 Branoff started in left in place of the alternating of the backfield
Howie Tommelein. personnel with Jim Maddock and
their efforts with the clutch hit- Today, the Wolverine nine goes John Greenwood doing most of the
ting of third baseman Don Eaddy against the University of Illinois quarterbacking.
to capture the thrilling win for at Champaign, and Saturday it Michigan's main problem of
the Wolverines. plays a doubleheader at Purdue. findinastro
gISAA~ a stron~ asser~. was ev

By MILT NATHANSON
Many years ago a little kid used
to crawl through a fence behind
his house onto the Red Run Golf
Course, only to be booted off.
The lad wasn't discouraged,
however, and today is Co-captain,
of Michigan's golf team, Bob Mc-
Masters.
McMasters has averaged a neat
75 in Michigan's five matches thus

It was a busy day on Ferry Field yesterday.
Under a blazing spring sun, ROTC cadets drilled, bands played,
and the Michigan football team, sparked by the flying feet of Jim
Pace, churned the soft turf into thousands of tiny pits.
Unnoticed only a few hundred yards away another type of acti-
vity was going on. Huge steam shovels and dozens of men dug deep
into the earth, hollowing out the outline of what will soon be the
"nation's finest swimming pool.
A few feet away, workmen were putting the interior touches
on the building which will soon become the nerve center of every,
Michigan sporting endeavor.
* * * *
THIS writer was lucky enough to tour the unfinished athletic
administration building yesterday through the courtesy of Don
Weir, Michigan's genial ticket manager, who put aside his ducats
and headaches long enough to show us what will 'soon be one of
the finest structures of its kind anywhere.
Entering the impressive glass entrance on the corner of State
and Hoover Streets, workmen were busy installing the final touches
on a huge lobby-featured by a large ticket window on one side,
and a receptionists' office at the far end. Over it all was a space
for a huge 11 by 15 foot mural of the Michigan Stadium, which
will be illuminated and thereby visible down State Street at night.
We picked our way over the maze of wires, boards, and beams
r into what would soon be a gigantic ticket office. This was Wier's,
department, and from all appearances it will serve his purposes well.
Not only are there huge ticket windows in the lobby, but also
an entrance that leads directly to track and baseball events.
* * * *
Eye to the Future ..
IN THE BACK of the ticket department are four windows over-
looking the mammoth hole in the ground outside. Weir ex-
plained that by next January, these windows will be looking into
the lobby of the new men's pool, thus further centralizing the Mich-
igan athletic plant.
In the other main floor wing, we viewed spaces for Les Etter's
athletic publicity department, and the spacious offices of athletic
director, H. 0. "Fritz" Crisler.
On the second level, there will be a whole wing devoted to
coaches offices, and another wing for football exclusively.
Scheduled to open its big glass doors on June 1st, the building
also has a huge basement area, filled with football projection rooms,
film vaults, and storage space.
THERE were even a few noticeable yawning spaces awaiting the
arrival of Michigan's huge trophy collection.
It seems the only thing that the Michigan athletic department
* failed to provide for in its new building was a niche for old Paul
Bunyan . . . the ill fated Michigan-Michigan State football trophy
... And frankly, who cares?

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McMasters Shines in Early
'Season Links Squad Meets

Enthused over the fine sophomore
contingent on the team, he says
"they have fine potential, and, if
they shape up, we're in for a great
year."
McMasters hails from Royal
Oak, where, at the age of eight, he
became a caddy. He toted clubs
for quite a few years, and devel-
oped his appreciation for golf by
doing so. One of his many experi-
ences as a caddy came in 1950,
when he caddied for Marty Furgol
in the Motor City Open.
A junior in the School of Busi-
ness Administration, he plans on
going into some type of technical
sales after he graduates, and has
no plans for professional golf.
Has Improved Constantly
McMasters began playing the
game seriously when he entered
Royal Oak High School. His con-
stant improvement can be seen by
comparing his averagerscores for
each of his three years of high
school competition: in the tenth
grade he averaged 94, in the elev-
enth, 81, and in his senior year, 76.
It was during his senior year
that he won the All-State High
School Tournament, shooting a
fine 74.
An Evans Scholar, he starred on
Michigan's freshman team, and
his play was good enough to win
the annual freshman tournament.
He has developed well since then
under the watchful eye of Coach
Bert Katzenmeyer.
McMasters retains the same ea-
gerness for the sport which he had
when he used to crawl through
fences, but now he is more than
welcome at the front door.

BOB McMASTERS
... golf co-captain

|
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far, and should better this aver-
age as the season progresses.
Impressed With Current Squad
He thinks that the current Wol-
verine squad should definitely fin-
ish better than last year's ninth
place effort in the Big Ten race.

and will also run tomorrow in the:
mile relay. I

.. . ........,w.

RALLY BRINGS SOFTBALL WIN:
Sammies Nip Phi Gams inOvertime, 5-4

lllllgaa11g pub Wa v-
denced during the workout, as the
"first team" backfield was unable
~to connect consistently through
the air.

:ii

11

Jay Grant came home on a wild
pitch in the seventh inning to
score the winning run, as Sigma
Alpha Mu beat Phi Gamma Del-
ta, 5-4, yesterday afternoon in I-M
social fraternity softball play.
The Sammies, trailing 4-1, took
advantage of Phi Gam pitcher
Paul Melgaard's wildness and scor-
ed three runs in the sixth inning,
to send the game into extra in-
nings.
Basil Nemer opened the sixth!
frame for the Sammies with a
clean single to center. Joel Tauber
than laid a perfect bunt down the
first base line and beat it out for
a base hit. Milt Goldstein flew out
but Irv Tobocman was hit by a
pitched ball to load the bases.
Larry Pearlman then walked to
drive in one run; Warren Werthei-
mer reached first on an error to
drive in another run; and Al Rein,
walked to drive in the typing run.
The Phi Gams garnered all their
runs in the first inning on a sin-
gle, two base-on-balls, two errors,
and two wild pitches.
After his rocky first inning,
Sammy pitcher Paul Groff sky set-
tled down and pitched a no-hit-

ter from there on in. Groff sky
struck out eight batters.
In other I-M social fraternity,
softball play, Sigma Phi Epsilon
defeated Trigon, 7-2.
The game was deadlocked at two
all until the Sig Eps exploded for
five runs in the final inning, on a
Cheerleading
Cheerleading tryouts will be
held in the I-M Building gym-
nastics room, May 2-7 starting
at 4 p.m.
triple, a single, three errors and a
hit batsman. Big blow of the aft-
ernoon was Lorne Norton's home
run in the fourth inning for the
Sig Eps.
In professional fraternity soft-
ball play, Alpha Omega downed
Phi Rho Sigma, 12-6. Paul Rich-
man, pitching for Alpha Omega
gave up only three hits,
Other professional fraternity
games played saw Tau Epsilon Rho
down Delta Sigma Pi, 14-9. The
Law Club beat Phi Alpha Delta,
9-7. Alpha Rho Chi walloped Al-
pha Kappa Psi, 20-3.

Phi Alpha Kappa shutout Phi
Delta Phi, 9-0. Psi Omega won
from Phi Chi, 14-3. Delta Theta
Phi beat Alpha Chi Sigma, 10-3,
and Phi Delta Epsilon out slug-
ged Nu Sigma Nu, 15-10.
Alpha Phi Alpha forfeited to
Kappa Sigma in a social frater-
nity contest.e

Scores
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Brooklyn 4, Chicago 2
New York 6, St. Louis 4
Philadelphia 3, Milwaukee 2
Cincinnati 3, Pittsburgh 2

I i

THIS WEEKEND
Visit tb.
For after the game entertainment '
DANCING
Tuesday, Frida® and
Saturday Night
Open 2 P.M. to 2 A.M.
Members of V.F.W. and their guests
Mary Lou, Your featured vocalist. Don Bailey, Your singing host

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Detroit 4, Washington 1
Boston 3, Chicago 1
New York 11, Kansas City 4

III

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CUXBW

314 E. Liberty St., Ann Arbor
Phone NO 2-3972-You must be 21
$Ann Arbor's Most Popular Club"

'AA

I

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

RADIO DISPATCHED

VETERAN'S CAB

I

NO 2-4477

24 Hours Service

We Go Anywhere

U

a

TONIGHT at 8
Department of Speech Presents
The Clugstone Inheritance
A New Character-Drana . . . By James Harvey '53
$1.20 - 90c - 60c
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

I

YOUR BEST BET -CALL A VET

Modern Dance Club presents -
A DANCE CONCERT

U

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SV

Sunday, May 1 at 8 P.
Pattengill Auditorium
ANN ARBOR HIGH SCHOOL
Tickets at the door. , . 75c

COLORFUL
J AnYIAI lE0I RO

I

ofI

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pedaling, lightweight bicycles that take you where-
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514-16 E. William Phone NO 2-0035

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-7--1

ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE WEEK
a
Friday Evening Services
SERMON by the
HONORABLE SIMCHA PRATT
Counsul-General of Israel in Chicago
ONEG SHABBAT (Israeli style) to follow.

11

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TONIGHT at 7:15

Hillel Building

Sponsored by
STUDENT ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF HI1LLEL

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