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February 10, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUTM.onAv wrimlortAkuwva imr*

' AGY. X H E__ _.I GN_.- -Y-___ _. - _.-- 1W W a

.1. L LIAcdIrn z, £' BDX1UAII,X 10, 1955

I

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Especially for HER.--
on
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February 14
Flowers and Gifts
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EXTENSION COURSE:
Informality Rules at Ceramic Class

Weather Lab To House
Civil Engineer Research

Inexpensive
Medical Aid
Noted at U'

By HENRY FINNEY
"I'm a potter, not a sculptor,"
commented J. T. Abernathy, In-
structor of Ceramics, explaining
that students can do sculpture in
his class even though the course
is designed for ceramics.
Two and a half hours every

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Shirts get our

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Wednesday night during the last
semester the students taking Ab-
ernathy's extension course ii cer-
amics at the Architecture Build-
ing busy themselves with fashion-
ing and finishing different kinds
of pottery.
Although about twenty students
have registered for the course for
the last five semesters, only two
thirds or a half of the class stay
with the work. The students get
no credit for the course. They
work solely on their own interest.
Work at Potter's Wheel
Abernathy sets each student to
work at a potter's wheel, and then
instructs them by going from table
ADVENTlRE
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to table pointing out faults and
demonstrating method. There are
no lectures or formal demonstra-
tion periods. Some students re-
marked that they were somewhat
disappointed because there was so
little formal instruction..
The class has two large kilns,
one electric and one gas, and a
small electric kiln at its disposal.
Another large gas kiln is now be-
ing built.
Most of the clay used is a nat-
ural clay which comes in powder-
ed form from New Jersey. Some
Michigan Slip, a clay mined near
Birmingham, is also used.
Mixed Artificially
All pottery, from the crudest
earthenware to the finest crystal,
is made from essentially the same
materials. The contents of finer
pottery like bone china and crys-
tal are mixed artificially. Clay
contains the same compounds, on-
ly in different proportions, with
some impurities, and naturally
mixed.
Dime store mugs are amazing-
ly fine pottery, said Abernathy. If
they were thinner and fired at a
temperature they would be like
bone china.
This semester, along with the
Wednesday night ceramics ex-
tension course, there will be ex-
tension classes in oil painting andi
other art forms.1

By GAIL GOLDSTEIN
Now just a bare skeleton of a
room, the penthouse laboratory
atop East Engineering Bldg. will
soon house equipment which will
keep a weather eye on the heavens.
Set high on the five-story struc-
ture as to permit an unobstructed
view of the sky, the new labora-
tory will be used for instructional
and research purposes, according
to Prof. E. Wendell Hewson of the
civil engineering department.
Along the sides of the room box-
es and cases of instruments are
standing waiting installation be-
fore actual operations cadi begin.
Observatory Instruments
Students in meteorology will take
laboratory courses in the new fa-
cility which will be equipped with
basic instruments for observing,
recording, and simulating weather
phenomena.
Also the site of research pro-
jects, the laboratory will be the
location of one sponsored by the
U.S. Air Force. This project will
deal with the diffusion of pollen
and industrial smokes into the at-
mosphere and their rates of pene-
tration onto buildings, Prof. Hew-
son noted.
Working full time in the labora-
tory on the Air Force study will be
A. Nelson Dingle, of the staff of
the Engineering Research Insti-
tute. Dingle is regarded as an au-

3

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thority on the behavior of pollen,
Prof. Hewson said. V. C. Liu, re-
search engineer with the Institute,
will also work on this project.
Penthouse Tower
Plans are now underway for the
construction of ,a 70-foot tower
atop the elevator penthouse next
to the laboratory which will also
be used for observation. The steel
triangular, self-supporting struc-
ture will look like a radio or -tele-
vision tower. Wind direction, wind
speed, and wind turbulance read-
ings will be tabulated from obser-
vations from this tower.
With completion of the labora-
tory set for about two months from
now, the activities of the lab will
also include observation of at-
mospheric pressure, temperature,
rainfall and wind.
Observations of solar radiation
will also play an important part
in the lab's activities since this
has become important as a source
for energy for heating houses and
mechanical purposes.
Greer To Give
First Concert
Frances Greer, soprano, will give;
her first concert in Ann Arbor at;
8:30 p.m. tomorrow in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
Miss Greer joined the School of
Music faculty as a lecturer in voice,
last September, after a career as
leading soprano in the Philadel-
phia and Metropolitan Opera Com-;
panies.
She will be accompanied by Eu-
gene Bossart, pianist. Bossart also
joinedrthe music faculty last Sep-
tember, as a lecturer in vocal lit-
erature and instructor in accom-
paniment.
Included on Miss Greer's pro-
gram tomorrow will be selections
by Arnold, Purcell, Pergolesi, Ra-
vel, Poulenc, Weill and Hageman.
The public is invited to the con-
cent free of charge. 1

i- a
atte ntio.j

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It Is possible to have an ap-
pendectomy performed at Health
Service for about $100.
Ordinarily a doctor would
charge approximately $125.
Low cost operations are only
one of the many services provided
by Health Service. Fifteen days
of general hospitalization each se-
mester or summer session are pro-
vided without charge.
Medical exams for new students,
immunizations, simple drugs and
other services are given to the stu-
dents without cost.
General Fund
Students are able to get medical
service at reasonable prices be-
cause of general funds contributed
by the University said Dr,.AV. E.
Forsythe, Health Service director.
Limited dental service - is given
by graduate dentists at Health
Service. Some cleaning is done end
simple fillings are put in. The der -
tai school provides more exten-
sive service.
Charges are made for special
prescriptions, expensive drugs or
excessive time or service. Fr ex-
ample, students must pay for hos-
pitalization days or daily expenses
above an allowance of $14.25. .
Health Service aims at provid-
ing the greatest amount of service
in the least amount of time. Medi-
cal costs are minimized, the build-
ing is centrally located and every-
thing is done to aid the student
and avoid becoming involved in
time consuming detail.
Architecture Talk
An illustrated lecture on North
African architecture will be given
by architect, author and photo-
grapher G. E. Kidder Smith at 3:30
p.m. today, Architecture Auditor-
ium.
The lecture is open to the pub
lic free of charge.

~P a-
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Postage prepid. Mich. Soles Tax in.

MAIL.ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY - CHECK HERE FOR C.O.D.-
ENCLOSED FIND $ FOR - DRAFTING SETS AT
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MAIL TO: Shop-by-Mail Co., Dept. 101
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