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February 10, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-10

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PAGE TWO

4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY. rEBRUARY 10. ION

. N

THURSDAY FRBRTTAI lA IOK

p

Public Health
School Tests
Drugs, Soap
io evaluation work, drug test-
ing and tests on everything from
stream pollution to dt jergents are
taking place at the University
School of Public Health.
Long range programs of faculty
projects are being carried out. Po-
lio evaluation work by Dr. Thomas
Francis Jr., chairman of the De-
partment of Epidemiology, leads
the research projects.
Another doctor is studying the
lifelong immunity to viruses which
babies acquire almost at birth.
Drug tests are constantly being
made. The drugs are sent by phar-
maceutical houses, and are tried
first on mice and then on monkeys
to determine their ability to de-
stroy the living polio virus.
Public health researchers also
find out which detergent is better
than others. They were asked by
the Army to examine hot dog
vending machines, milk dispensing
units and copper wires as a means
of carrying carLonated water.
Willow Run Center
Has Job openings
Anyone interested in securing
part-time work at Willo-' Run Re-
search Center as an experimental
subject in some systems of engi-
neering may apply at the Person-
nel Office, Room 3012 Administra-
tion Bldg. by Friday noon.
Applicants must have all day
Thursday free and must be United
States citizens. Jobs are also avail-
able for those who wish full time
employment in the same capacity
during summer vacation.
Fountain Pens
School Supplies
Typewriters
Desks
Files
Chairs
JV 1CA 1
MORRI LL'S
314 S. State St. Since 1908
Phones NO 8-7177 - NO 8-9610
Open Soturdoys until 5 P.M.

Authors Increase Use
Of Historical Collection

Five books published last year
contain materials from the Michi-
gan Historical Collections of the
University.
Gerald Carson used the collec-
tions as a source of information
for his book, "The Old Country
Store" (Oxford University Press).
Now engaged in writing another
book,
Sloss To Give
First Geology
Series Lecture
Prof. L. L. Sloss of Northwestern
University will deliver the first in
a series of lectures today and to-
morrow on the general topic of
stratigraphy and sedimentation.
Prof. Sloss will talk at 8:00 p.m.
today in Rm. 2054 of the Natural
Science Building on "Sedimentary
Petrology and Sedimentary Tec-
tonics."
He will also speak at 4:00 p.m.
tomorrow in the same room on
"Methods and Problems of Facies
Interpretations."
At 8:00 p.m. tomorrow Prof.
Sloss will lecture in the Natural
Science Auditorium on "Geologic
History of Western North Ameri-
ca."
Prof. Sloss will offer the first
in a series of lectures to be given
by prominent geologists in various
specializations of the geologic sci-
ences.
Each visiting lecturer will be on
campus for approximately one.
week. During that time he will de-
liver three or four talks and con-
sult with graduate students in ad-
vanced classes.
There will be five lectures rep-
resenting the fields of stratigraphy
and sedimentation, economic geol-
ogy and structure, vertebrate pal-
eontology and historical geology,
paleontolo,, and paleobotony, ge-
omorphology and geophysics.
Part-time Jobs
According to John Case of the,
personnel office, employment in
retail and clerical positions are
more difficult to obtain than jobs;
in the engineering or scientific
fields.
However, Case noted, all stu-
dents who are looking for part-1
time work are requested to con-
tact the personnel office so as
many may be helped as possible.
Persons with part-time jobs avail-
ible are also requested to call the
office.

Allan Nevins gathered informa-
tion from the Henry B. Joy Pa-
pers in the collections for his,
"Ford: The Times, The Man, The
Company" (Scribners).
In the "Letters of Theodore
Roosevelt," edited by Elting E.
Morison (H a r v a r d University
Press), a number of letters writ-
ten by Roosevelt to Chase S. Os-
born are published.
Morc Researchers
In November, the University
Press released "James Burrill An-
gell: An American Influence" by
Shirley W. Smith, vice-president
and secretary emeritus of the Uni-
versity.
F. Clever Bald, assistant director
of the collections, used them in
writing his book, "Michigan in
Four Centuries."
Sidney Fine is using it to write
hs book, "Laissez-faire and the
General Welfare State in Ameri-
can Thought, 1865-1901," which is
scheduled for publication in 1955.
Professor Z. Clark Dickinson of
the economics departgment is us-
ing the Collections as a source of
material for lis biography of the
noted economist, Fred M. Taylor.
Simes jives
Talk on W'ills
After offering "a true rationale"
of the legal policy against perpetu-
ities, Prof. Lewis M. Simes of the
University Law School gave his
criticism of the policy and suggest-
ed amendments yesterday.
At the third in the series of Coo-
ley Lectures, Prf. Simes discussed
his justification of the policy,
which prevents a will maker from
rendering property inalienable for
more than 21 years after the death
of a specified person.
The policy, he said, provides a
fair balance between the desires
of the dead testator and the liv-
ing benefactor, and allows the liv-
ing to control the property.
His major suggestion was that
the rule should, instead of invali-
dating the offending will, allow
the court to change the will so
that at satisfies the testator's de-
sires as nearly as possible.
" Other changes were mentioned,
and Prof. Simes added that revi-,
sion should take place gradually
through amendments.
The next lecture in the series,
"The Policy Against Accumula-
tions," is scheduled for 4:15 p.m.
Monday.

Art Exhibit
Closes Soon
The Toledo Museum exhibit of
Dutch masterpieces, attracting a
daily average of 1,200 visitors, will
now remain open until 10 p.m.
each day of the showing.
Closing Feb. 13, the collection of
17th century paintings has been
shown in the New York Metropoli-
tan Museum and is scheduled for
the Toronto Art Gallery.
Paintings by Rembrandt, Frans
Hals, Jan Steen, Jan Vermeer and
50 other Dutch artists are included
in the exhibit, entitled "The Gold-
en Age of Dutch Painting."
Private and museum collections
in 32 American and European cit-
ies have been drawn on for the
exhibit.
The exhibit is open during the
week from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m., and
from 1 to 10 p.m. on Sunday. Free
gallery talks are given daily at 3
p.m. and also at 8 p.m. on Sunday,
Tuesday and Thursday.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form'to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts and organization
meetings cannotbe published oftener
than twice,
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1955
Vol. LXV, No. 84
Notices
Any veteran who expects to receive
education and training allowance under
Public Law 550 (Korea G.I. Bill) at the
University of Michigan for the FIRST
TIME must report to Room 555 of the
Administration Building with tuition
receipt between 8:30._a.m. and 3:00 p.m.
Feb. 10 or 11 if he has not already done

status, students should inquire at the
Office of Student Affairs. Participation
in an extra-curricular activity in viola-
tion of the requirements may subject a
student to disciplinary action.
Restrictions
In interpretation of the above Eligi-
bility statement, the following are spe-
cifically forbidden to participate in ex-
tracurricular activities indicated below:
a) Students on academic discipline,
i.e., notification, warning, probition, ac-
tion pending, as determined by the fac-
ulty of the college in which the student
is enrolled.
b) Part-time and special students
carrying less than twelve hours.
Activities
The eligibility requirements must be
met by students participating in such
activities as are listed below. The list
is not exhaustiv~e but is intended to in-
dicate the kinds of extracurricular ac-
tivities for participation in which leigi-
bility is necessary.
a) Participation in public perform-
ances which are sponsored by student
organizations and which require group
rehearsals. Examples: Union Opera, Jun-
ior Girls' Play; productions of Gilbert
and Sullivan Society, Student Players,
and Inter-Arts Union: performances of
Arts. Choraie and the Glee Clubs.
b) Participation in public perform-
ances which are sponsored by acaderic
courses and which require group rehear-
sals, for those participants who are not
enrolled in the sponsoring course for
credit. Examples: Ensemble 45, 46 (Or-
chestra), 11, 12, 155, 156 (Opera Work-
shop).
c) Staff members of student publica-
tions. Examples: Daily, Gargoyle, Mich-
iganensian, Technic, Generation.
d) Officers and chairmen of standing
committees in student organiztions,
including house groups. This includes
positions in house groups, such as so-
cial, athletic, rushing, personnel, pledge
training, and publication chairmen,
house managers, and stewards.
e) Class officers or candidates for
such office.
f) Members and candidates for mem-
bership in student government groups.
Examples: Student Legislature, Student
Government Council, Judiciary Coun-
cils, Interfraternity Council, Interco-
operative Council, League and Union
student government groups, Music
School Assembly, Business Administra-
tion Council.
g) Committee members for major
campus projects and dances. Examples:
Michigras, Winter Carnival, League
committees, Frosh week-end, Sophomore
Cabaret, Assembly Ball, Interfraternity
Council Bal, Homecoming Dance, Sen-
ior Ball, J-Hop.
h) Representatives to off-campus ac-
tivities.
1) Representatives on student-faculty
committees.
Special Permission
Special permission to participate in
extracurricular activities in exception
to the regulations may be granted in
extraordinary cases by the offices of
the Dean of Women and of the Dean
of Men.
Denial of Permission
The Dean of Women or the Dean of
Men may, in extraordinary cases, deny
permission to participate in an activity
or activities.
Managers and chairmen of student ac-
tivities and projects are required to
submit to the Office of Student Affairs
an alphabetized list of all students pr-
ticipating in activities under their lead-
ership, indicating positions held. For
activities which are organized at the
beginning of a semester, lists must be
filed not later than the end of the third
week of classes. For activities organized
during the semester, participation lists
must be filed within forty-eight hours
after the activity is organized.
Medical College Admission Test: Ap-
plication blanks for the May 7 admin-
istration of the Medical College Ad-
mission Test are now available at 110
Rackham Building. Application blanks
are due in Princeton, N.J. not later
than April 23. If you expect to enter
medical school in the fall of 1956, you
are urged to take the test on May 7.
Admission Test for Graduate Study
in Business: Application blanks for the
May 14 administration of the Admission
Test for Graduate Study in Business
are no wavailable at 110 Rackham Bldg.
Application blanks are due in Princeton,
N.J .not later than April 30.
Art Print Loan Collection: The of-
fice, 510 Administration Building, will
be open Mon. through Fri. 10:00 a.m.-
12:00m. & 1:00-5:00 p.m. Sat. 8:00 a.m.-
12:0Gm. Rented pictures may be picked
up at'these dates, and others may be
rented.
The following student sponsored so-
cial events are approved for the coming
week-end. Social chairmen are reminded
that requests for approval for social
events are due in the Office of Student
Affairs not later than 12:00m. on the
Mon. prior to the event:
Feb. 11-

Alice Lloyd Hall
Alpha Kappa Alpha
Delta Theta Phi
Jordan Hall
Reeves House
Tau Delta Phi
Feb. 12--
Alpha Delti Phi
Alpha Kappa Kappa
Beta Theta Pi
Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Red Wallet at Yost Field House
Monday afternoon. $5 reward if wallet
is returned with money. Ext. 230,
NO 2-5553. )66A
LOST-One D.U. pin over J-Hop week-
end, Call 306 Mosher. )67A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
Hallicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1 2 blocks east of East Eng. )47I
TUXEDO, size 40-42, excellent condi-=
tion. Also 3 dress shirts, 16-33, 2-
152-34. NO 3-3821. )215B
MAKE MONEY in spare time. Parking
lot striping machine-any reasonable
offer takes. T. W. Tuttle, NO 2-6674.
)226B
FOR SALE Royal portable, elite type.
Call Patricia Cooper evenings, NO
3-1511, Ext. 544. )225B
8 RED, BLACK and Beige Plaid Bates
Bedspread Lengths. Can also use for
drapes. $4.00 per bedspread length.
Call NO 2-2569. )224B
AUTOMATIC ENLARGER Focomat No.
2. Fully automatic accommodates
35mm and 21x3% negatives. Lens
equipment Leitz 3 cm. 1-35 Leitz
9-5 cm 1-4. Phone NO 3-2666 or NO
8-6666. )223B
1950 CHEVROLET-Deluxe Club Coupe
privately owned, two-tone grey. Ex-
cellent upholstery, exterior, mechan-
ical condition. Radio and heater, good
tires. '55 liscense, $495 cash. NO 2-8644.
)228B
KLIPSCHORN. Perfect condition. Call
NO 2-1291, after six. )229B
1948 CHEVROLET, radio and heater.
Clean. Call NO 8-9662 after 5 P.M.
)230B
DOBERMAN PINCHER, excellent fra-
ternity pet. A.K.C. registered. 5
months old. $60. NO 8-8169. )231B
1946 FORD-Radio, heater, $150. 1947
Buick sedan, radio and heater, $150.
Fitzgerald-Jordan, Inc., 607 Detroit
St. NO 8-8141. )232B
CAMERA WITH FLASH-Vito II-3.5
lens, 35mm. Speeds 1-500 $35. NO
2-7666. )234B
WOMEN'S ENGLISH BIKE, all gadgets,
new in Sept.,$45; ski boots, 8D, $8;
women's ski suit, size 34, $25. Call
NO 2-5955. )242B
VIKING SKIIS and poles for sale cheap.
Call NO 8-6482 before noon. )241B

FOR SALE
ENGLISH RACER, hardly used, $35.
Call W. Bucci at NO 3-8684 after 6.
)240B
1951 FORD VICTORIA. Two-tone green.
Radio and heater. Overdrive. 30,000
miles. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )235B
1948 CHEVROLET. Two-door. maroon,
Radio and heater. Low mileage, one
owner. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222
W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )236B
1948 CHEVROLET Aero Sedan. Two-
door, black, radio and heater, clean,
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington,NO 2-4588. 237B
1946 CHEVROLET. 30,000 actual miles,
radio and heater. Two-tone blue, a
beautiful car. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)238B
1949 JEEP Station Wagon. Six cylinder
with overdrive. Radio and heater.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )239B
FOR RENT
ONE OR TWO GIRLS to share 4-room
furnished apt. on Arch near Packard
and State. NO 3-3472 after 5 P.M. )20C
APARTMENT for Men. Students, Cam-
pus, furnished, i bedrooms, kitchen,
living room, bath, $140; 1 bedroom
apt., furnished, $105. NO 3-8454. )23C
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. Student rooms.
)23D
DOUBLE ROOM, modern furnishings
near campus. 1111 White, NO 2-9625.
) 39D
1, 2, AND 3-MAN ROOMS-3 blocks from
campus-$6 per week. Phone Bill Lar-
son at NO 2-3173. )41D
3 ROOM APARTMENT to share with
male student. NO 2-4221 Nights. )42D
STUDENT ROOM, men, on campus.
Double at $6.50 each. Single $9. NO
8-9402 or NO 8-6087. )43D
2 SENIOR GIRLS desire 3rd roommate
to share nice modern apartment.
Call NO 3-0430. )46D
SUITE--Living, study room with fire-
place, telephone, twin bedroom, pri-
vate bath, garage space in beautiful
and quiet Barton Hills. Male grad de-
sires roommate. Reasonable. Owner
requires reference. NO 3-5841. )45D
ROOM AND BOARD
BOARDERS WANTED. Good food. Close
to campus. Any combination of meals
desired. Call NO 3-8581 for informa-
tion. )8E
BOARDERS WANTED. Any arrange-
ment of meals. Breakfast 30 cents,
lunch 60 cents, dinner $1.20. Call NO
3-5806. )9E
REASONABLE BOARD at a professional
fraternity. Good food. Call House
Manager at NO 2-8312. )11E
BOARDERS WANTED. Good food, Rea-
sonable rates. For information call
NO 8-8400. )10E

PERSONAL
STUDENTS-begin or continue your
piano playing while at college. Artist
teachers-practice facilities. Robert
Dumm Piano Studios, call NO 2-3541.
ORGANIZING SIMMONS TOUR to Eur
ope, about $1,100. French line trans-
portation. Small group plans own
itinerary. For information call Ar-
lene Fineman at NO 8-9388. )56P
Atlantic Monthly ........$2 (8 mos.)
Holiday .................$3 (10 mos.)
Ladies Home Journal ....$4 (20 mos)
*Life ....................$4 (yr.)
*Newsweek............ ....$3 (yr.)
Sat, Evening Post .. .$3.50 (35 wks.)
*Time....................$3 (yr.)
U. S. News.........$2.67 (26 wks.)
*Students only. Many other specials
for a limited time only. Ideal Valen-
tine gifts. Phone NO 2-3061, Student
Periodical, Y55F
HELP WANTED
WANT SALESMEN for Michigan. Jacket
emblems. Nord, Box 92, Forest Hills,
N.Y. )30H
BUSINESS SERVICES
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sox washed also. )8y
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
BABY OR SMALL CHILD for day care
in liscensed home. NO 3-5830. )231
TYPING WANTED-reasonable rates.
Mrs. Mullet, 726 S. Main NO 8-6883.
)22I
TYPING--Thesis, term papers, etc. Rea-
sonable rates, prompt service, 830
South' Maix, NO 8-7590. )251
WANTED TO BUY
BACH CORONET, used First Line In-
strument. Call Collect Royal Oak,
Lincoln 2-4135. )222B
DESIRE girl's lightweight bike. Call
NO 3-0430. )6J
ALTERATIONS
DRESSMAKING, ALTERATIONS, HEMS.
Prompt service, Call NO 3-0783. )4N
ALTERATIONS. LADIES' GARMENTS.
Prompt Service. Call NO 2-2678 Alpha
Graves. 241
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr.,f'Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )24

USFEflt

so.

9

44

ORPHEUM
Starting Friday

Fraternities
Name Pledges
(Continued from Page 1)
well, '58; Lawrence Catkin, '58;
Walter McCollom, '57; and Ear-
nest Myers, '58E.
Phi Kappa Tau: James Kelley,
'58E; and Henry Newlin, '58.
Phi Sigma Kappa: Robert John-
ston, '56E; Walter Penny,,'56NR;
Ronald Piotter, '56PbH; and Rob-
ert Wheeler, '57.
Sigma Chi: Ronald Kramer, '57.
Sigma Nu: Frederick Bjork, '58.
Tau Kappa Epsilon: Norman
Garret and Ronald Sandilands,
'56E.
Theta Chi: Frederick Gielow,
Theta Xi: Norman Kopmeyer,
'58.
Triangle: Robert DeLosh, '57E.
Trigon: Herbert Bensinger, '56;
Guy Berry, '57E; Donald Hadley,
'56; Paul Jansma, '57; James
King, '58E; William Nighbor, '57E;
John Rollin, '57E; and Jerry
Wells, '58.
Zeta Psi: Glenn Bond, '58E;
William Granse, '58; Robert Mc-
Carty, '58; John Nelson, '58E; and
Richard Carver.
Dial NO 2-3136 for
Schedule Information
HURRY! LAST DAYS!

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Several Laurel Harper Seeley Scholar-
ships are being announced by the Alum-
ni Association of the University of
Michigan 'for the academic year 1955-
56. These awards are in the a,,mount of
$200 each and are open to both graduate
and ,ndergraduate women. The awards
are made on the basis of scholarship,
contribution to University life and fi-
nancial need.
Application may be made through the
Alumnae Council Office in the Michigan
League Building. Applications must be
filed before April 1. Awards will be an-
nounced by April 30.
The Alice Crocker Lloyd Fellowship
with a stipend of $750 is being offered
by the Alumnae Council of the Alumni
Association of the University of Michi-
gan for the academic year 1955-56. This
award is open to women who are grad-
uates of an accredited college or univer-
sity. It may be used by a University of
Michigan graduate for work at any col-'
lege or university, but a graduate of any
other university will be required to use
the award for work, on the Michigan
campus. Personality, achievement, and,
leadership will be considered in grant-
ing the award.
Application for the fellowship may be
made through the Alumnae Council
Office, Michigan League, Ann Arbor,
Michigan. All applications must be filed
by April 1. Award will be announced by
April 30.
Choral Union Vacancies-A few va-
cancies exist in the tenor and bass sec-
tions of the University Choral Union,
due to graduation and calls to service.
The Choral Union will perform in two
concerts of the May Festival with the
Philadelphia Orchestra.
Applicants should make appointments
for auditions promptly at the offices of
the University Musical Society in Bur-
ton Tower; or telephone Normandy 8-
7513, or University Ext. 2118.
Eligibility:
Rules Governing Participation in Non-
Athletic Extracurricular Activities. Any
regularly enrolled student is eligible
to participate in non-athletic extra-
curricular activities provided he is not
on academic discipline.
Responsibility
Responsibility for observance of the
eligibility statement is placed directly
upon the student. In case of doubt of

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THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
a professional arena theatre invites you to
"THE COCKTAIL PARTY"
by T. S. ELIOT
Thursday thru Sunday 8:15 P.M. until Feb. 20th
Matinee Feb. 20th, 2:30 P.M.
STUDENT RATE 99c
General Admission $1.65

I

Out of Jules Verne's
e ue
The
Motion Picture
ofhmil
6w

0

Revervations4 NO 2-5915

Masonic Temple, 327 S. Fourth

.. ...

I

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Cinema SL jIcd
Frank C apra's
"YOU CAN'T TAKE IT
WIT H YOU"
sia rr i ng

Al

I

keeping company
side by side..
two beloved colognes
in a gold-and-white gift box
designed to thrill

I
4

FXTRA

I

I'i nI

I

I s. , =IA Z . &I

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'I

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