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April 22, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

PAGE I

THE MICHIGAN'J DAILY

rR.MAV- A'PVTT. 99 161CA

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'GOOD TO THE LAST DROP':
Turkish Coffee Poured in 'Hideaway'

CAMPUS CALENDAR

By JIM DYGERT
Someone told me there was still
a Turkish coffee house in Ann
Arbor.
So I took a couple of friends
to help me investigate the place
which was reportedly located at
113% N. Main St.
But we couldn't find any 1131/2
N. Main St. Not until we asked a
fellow in one of the block's many
taverns did we learn that a plain
green door did indeed open upon
a stairway leading upward to the
Ann Arbor Coffee House, the city's
last Turkish coffee shop.
From upstairs came the sound
of chuckling voices, reminiscent
of a pool hall, but more subdued.
One floor up on our left was a
screen door, that opened on a
room where two foursomes, all
men, were drinking coffee and
playing cards.
Before we had a chance to look
over the place, a thin man in a
brown suit and wearing a hat came
from the rear of the room to find
what we wanted. He was James
Grapsas, proprietor.
Yes, this was a Turkish coffee
house, Yes, it was the only one in
Ann Arbor. Would we like some
coffee?
He steered us toward one of the
six tables but we hesitated to see
how the coffee was made. When
we questioned him about it, he
said he was just going to have a
cup himself and would show us
how it was made.
He dug a spoonful of finely
powdered coffee from a canister
and dumped it into a metal cup
and duplicated the process with
sugar. After pouring what seemed1
only a dash of water into the mix-
ture, he set the cup in a pan of
heated sand. Suddenly, the coffee
-was boiling.
Once we had sat down we had
a chance to look around. The
place was all atmosphere. It was
just a plain room, with plain
tables, plain chairs, even plain
hooks along two walls for coats.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Coming Events
Frosh Weekend. Maize Team Tickets
Committee Meeting, Sat., April 23 at
10:00 a.m. In the League. All members
must attend.
Frosh Weekend. Maize Team mem-
bers interested in participating in
stunts next week are asked to attend a
preparatory meeting, Sat., April 23 at
10:15 a.m. in the League.
University Ballet Club presents its
Spring Concert "The Ocean Floor," Sat.,
April 23, at 3:00 p.m. on the second
floor of .Barbour Gymnasium.
Hillel: Israeli Independence Dance
Sat., Apr. 23, 9:00 p.m. featuring Paul
Brodie and his bnd. Dancing 9:00-12:00
p.m. Refreshments and entertainment.
35c per person.
Hillel: Sat., Apr. 23, 9:00 a.m. Services
in chapel.
Stump Speaker's Society of Sigma
Rho Tau will have its second debate
practice on the affirmative, "Resolved:
The automobile manufacturers should
adopt a guaranteed annual wage." Sat.,
April 23 at 10:00 a.m. in 2084 East En-
gineering. All interested engineers, ar-
chitects, and technologists invited.
Bible seminars sponsored by West-
minster Student Fellowship in Room
217 of the Presbyterian Student Cen-
ter, Sun., April 24, 9:15 and 10:45 a.m.

Today is the last day that peti-
tions may be turned in for posi-
tions on the Engineering Council.
Any student in the Engineering
College is eligible. Petitions are
posted on the bulletin boards in
East and West Engineering Bldgs.
Union life memberships may be
picked up from 8 through 12 a.m.
and 1:30 through 5 p.m. today in
the Union business office.
Prof. Nidamarulu Srinivasan,
visiting lecturer from India in the
political science department, will
lead a discussion on "The Signi-
ficance of Bandung" at 8 p.m. to-
day at the International Center.
The talk is one of a series of
informal discussions sponsored by
the Center.
* *. *
Wilber M. Brucker, general

counsel for the Defense Depart-
ment and former Michigan gover-
nor, will be featured speaker at the
Law School's annual Founder's
Day banquet at 6 p.m. in the Uu%.
ion.
Brucker will speak on "Our Na-
tion's Defenses."
* * *
Visitors' Night, sponsored by the
astronomy department, will be
held at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 2003,
Angell Hall.
A talk by John H. Waddell on
"The Sun" will be followed by ob-
servation with telescopes and bi-
noculars if the sky is clear. The
observatory on the fifth floor of
Angell Hall will be open until 10
p.m. Visitors' Night is open to the
public.
* * *
A field day for fishermen start-

ing at 9 a.m. tomorrow will be held!
at Yost Field House.
Sponsored by the Department of
Fisheries of the School of Natural
Resources the program will in-
clude talks, exhibitions and dem-
onstrations for fishermen. at
Demonstrations of baitcasting,
flycastirig, spinning and trolling,
and talks on trout, perch, walleye,
sunfish and bluefish angling will
all be part of this clinic.
An open house and demonstra-
tions of services available to fish-
ermen on the University campus
will also be open to the public.
Michigan has four times as 114 East Williams
much water-covered area as any NO 8-7191
other state-11,037 inland lakes,
36,350 miles of streams and 3,121
miles of Great Lakes shoreline.

Free Booklet Tells How
You Can Read Better,
Faster, Easier

Are you the type?

TURKISH COFFEE-James Grapsas, proprietor of Ann Arbor's
remaining Turkish coffee house, pours from the metal cup he
had just taken from the hot sand on the stove. He has been sell-
ing Turkish coffee here since 1937.

i
I
1

The only things that seemed
out of place were the coke machine
near the door and the cigarette
dispenser by the front windows.
Everything else looked as if it
must have been the same when
the shop opened in 1937.
The coffee tasted sweet and dry,
like hot chocolate except for the
chocolate flavor. It seemed to last

a long time, sipping it from the
tiny cups.
Where did the coffee come from?
From Detroit, Grapsas said. This
was too much. The romantic bub-
ble had burst.
We got up to leave, stopping
only to learn that Grapsas serves
mostly regular customers, is 671
years old, and came to this coun-
try from Greece 46 years ago.

CHICAGO (Special)-Now every
student can learn to zip through
reading assignments quickly and
easily, actually read difficult study
material twice as fast with complete
understanding. The secret is an
amazing new simple technique, de-
veloped by Steven Warren of
Chicago's famed Foundation for
Better Reading.
Although most students are slow
word-by-word readers, this new
proven method helps anyone pick
up speed, says the noted educator.
Poor reading habits can cost you too

much study time, make exams
harder, cause disappointing grades,
and keep you from essential social
activities.
To acquaint student readers of
this paper with this miraculous new
technique for better reading, full de-
tails are described in a fascinating
booklet, "How You Can Read Bet-
ter, Faster.Easier." It will be mailed
free to anyone who requests it. No
obligation. Address: Mr. iSteven
Warren, President, Dept. 9264,
Foundation for Better Reading;
20 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, Ill.

i

0w

See it-
Drive it-

You'll find a world of new fun at
the wheel of a new Chevrolet-and
the exciting discoveries you make
can help you win one!
Driving a beautiful new Chevrolet is
thrill enough any time. It is more
rewarding right now, because the
things you find out on your drive
can help you win a 1955 Chevrolet
plus a $1,000 U. S. Savings Bond!
For instance, your drive will show
you what it means to sit in a luxuri-
ous Fisher Body, to see all four
fenders from the driver's seat, and
to get a man's-size look ahead
through a Sweep-Sight windshield.
You'll learn that Chevrolet puts
new comfort in going! New Glide-
Ride front suspension and Outrigger

rear springs. New ease to guiding
the car with Ball-Race Steering. A
new smoothness to all stops with
Anti-Dive Braking Control. A con-
stant flow of outside air from the
new High-Level ventilation system.
You'll discover new fun whether
you drive Chevrolet's new 162-horse-
power "Turbo-Fire V8" or one of
the two new 6's. (All with the only
12-volt system in their field.) You
can learn about the smoothness of
three great transmissions-automatic
Powerglide, new Overdrive (extra-
cost options) and Synchro-Mesh.
Come in soon. Pick up your entry
blank and get the complete details
on Chevrolet's big Miracle Mile Con-
test. It's easy to enter and you'll
enjoy yourself. So drop in while
there's still plenty of time left to win!

t

WI

IT!

715 NORTH UNIVERSITY
Announces the
services of
MICHAEL MICKLEA

Your first lesson is

Is e

U

Look at your

Card .

DOES YOUR LAST NAME START WITH
IF IT DOES, COME IN ANYTIME TODAY,
FRIDAY, APRIL 22nd AND RECEIVE 25%
OFF ON YOUR PURCHASE OR PURCHASES!?
TODAY ONLY
cash only, no refunds or exchanges - you must
have your current I.D. card with you - & your
last name must start with "M".
NO GIMMICKS, NO HOLDS BARRED, SPEND
AS MUCH AS YOU CAN!
every book in the store included - even all the
titles now marked down during our big sale -
have no mercy?
2 % +l Off

.0

e
3
1.
7

COMPLETE and OFFICIAL figures show that again in 1954-for the 19th straight year-
MORE PEOPLE BOUGHT CHEVROLETS THAN ANY OTHER CAR!
- ------------------------------------ --------- - -

See Your

Chevrolet Dealer

absolutely free at any
Arthur Murray Studio
Find out how quickly and easily
you can become anonula1-r rt..

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