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April 20, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20, 1959

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. APRIL 20. 1935

Meyer Hits
Right Wing
In Congress
"The country is sick and tired
pf reactionaries in Congress," Ag-
nes E. Meyer of the Washington
Post and Times-Herald empha-
sized yesterday in a journalism
lecture.,
"Social progress can't be ar-
rested, but it can be impeded,"
she warned. "Unless right wing
leaders support the President on
the homefront and abroad, the
Republicans will not only lose the
1956 elections, but they will de-
stroy the Republican Party."
Blames Reactionaries
In her speech, "The Press As
Servant of Light and Progress,"
Mrs. Meyer condemned the pres-
ent "disgraceful security pro-
gram," placing the blame on "re-
actionary groups in the govern-
ment."
Calling for expansion of the
public school system, she praised
Eisenhower's attempts. However,
she condemned those in the gov-
ernment who are "more interested
in saving money than in the wel-
fare of our children."
Mrs. Meyer explained there are
20 states that can not take advan-
tage of the Federal Loan to Edu-
cation because of their debt limi-
tations. "The loan program is a
fake," she said. "It pretends to be
useful."
Cites KKK Traditions
She attacked the stand on de-
segregation in the schools taken by
"certain die-hards" as being "in
the best Ku Klux Klan traditions."
Placing responsibility on the
newspapers to explain fully why
desegregation must be accepted as
the law of the land, the speaker
said, "Local newspapers are more
important today than ever before.
It is in the communities where
public opinion is made."
Freedom Week
Three faculty members will dis-
cuss "Is There a Trend Towards
Conformity in Academic Free-
dom?" at 7:35 p.m. tomorrow in
Auditorium B, Angell Hall.
Sponsored by the Young Demo-
crats, Prof Edwin E. Moise of the
mathematics department, Prof.
William E. Palmer of the econom-
ics department and Prof. Arthur
Eastman of the English depart-
ment will take part in the discus-
sion.

'TWO-HAT OUTFIT":
Creativity Aim of WUOM
In OriginatingBroadcasts

Heart Fund
Needs Help
From Public

-I

Crowds

Gather

at

Fire

By TAMMY MORRISON

I

"This is a two-hat outfit."
Bill Bender, Jr., was speaking of
University Broadcasting Service
WUOM, of which he is Script Edi-
tor.
"We put on one hat and do a
series, right from the original idea
to the final tape. Then we put on
another hat, flip a switch and
broadcast it," he continued.
Emphasizes Functions
Emphasizing what he feels is the
modern function of a.radio broad-
casting serVice he said, "We're not
just switch pullers. We create more
programs than any other commer-
cial or educational unit in the
state."
Ideas for all WUOM's series
come from any and all of the Ser-
vice's staff members, and some
from suggestions of faculty mem-
bers.
Bender outlined several series
which started out as just the germ
of an idea, such as the centennial
series on the Soo locks and "Red
Man in Michigan," devoted to Mi-
chigan Indians.
"It' would be nice if you could
reach into a drawer and pull out a
series, but you can't," he said. "You
have to create and implement it
yourself."
Traces Idea
He traced an idea which is now
in its embryonic stages right
through to broadcasting, the role
of Michigan in the Civil War.
About two months ago, Ed Bar-
rows, assistant director, was ap-
proached by those running the
Summer Session. They suggested
a series that would tie in with the
Hectorians Call
WhenZeus climbed high on
golden dawn
And smiled on fates of Priam's
land.
He blessed persuit
At .noble Hector's hand.
The call went forth
For each to take his stand.
Then all the best of Troy were
brought
By honor to this noble band.
Those called were: Bob Knut-
son, '56; Dick Schacht, '56 BAd.;
Frank Vick, '56 and Bob Wein-
baum, '56.

summer session's theme, "Michi-
gan."
The Service tried to find some-
thing that hadn't been done re-
cehtly and came up with "Michi-
gan in the Civil War,"
Organizing Material
"We're now trying to organize
the material," Bender said, iidi-
cating a pile of reference books
stacked on his desk. "We'll prob-
ably make a chronology of the
major actions, then pinpoint some
Michigan regiment in the action
and build a story around it."
After the scripts are written, a
major undertaking in itself, they
go into production. Bill Stegath,
production director, will cast
roles, assemble sound effects and
music and tape the shows."
The programs may be extended
to a 13 to 26 program series as
part of the station's "Package
Program Service." The service was
primarily intended for schools
around the state, but such distin-
guished clients as "Voice of Amer-
ica" have taken programs from.
it.
Bender concluded, "We're build-
ing things-creativity is our aim."
Quadrants Tap
Sixteen Men
Sixteen men were tapped by
Quadrants, West Quadrangle hon-
or society, last night for outstand-
ing service to the quad and the
University.
Tapped were Alan Arms, '55;
Jim Bakeman, '56; Jim Bauch,
'57E; Ted Beals, '56; Buck Bebeau,
'57; Sam Ching, '55P; 'Pete Gold-
stein, '56; Nelson Howe, '57.
Also tapped were Doyne Jack-
son, '55; Al Larson; Al Senter,
'57; Jack Watson, '55; Walt Wegst,
'56E; Tom Windeknecht, '57E.
Prof. Waldo Abbott, director of
WUOM and University President
Harlan H. Hatcher were tapped as
honorary members.
Walloon Lake, nestled amid
greenclad hills south of Petoskey,
boasts crystal-clear water so pure
that local residents use it in their
automobile batteries.
COLLEGIANS:
Try our Personnel - Work-
manship - Service - Hair-
cutters
No waiting at
The Daseola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre
Shop for
STUDENT
SUPPLIES
in the Modern Manner
Open Display - Self Selection
- BUY AS YOU BROWSE-
Shop at
FOLLETT'S
State St. at N. University

A dynamic plan with public
support is the way the heart pro-
gram was described by Dr. John
Ferree.
Research, community service,
and education are the outstanding
parts of the heart program, Dr.
Ferree said today in his lecture in
the School of Public Health.
The research phase of the plan
is yery important. In the last 30
or 40 years more knowledge has
been gained than in past centur-
ies. Fifty per cent of funds are
spent on research.
Efforts are being made to re-
move the fear aspects of heart
disease. The public is gaining in-
formation which will help them to
understand the heart problem.
Victims of the disease are learning
to live productive lives even though
they have heart trouble.
"A staggering number of pam-
phlets and films have been pro-
duced for the purpose of spreading
knowledge of heart disease.
Engine School
Faculty To Meet
Faculty members of the Engi-
neering College will meet at 4:15
p.m. in Rm. 348 West Engineering
Bldg.
Included in the agenda will be
new courses offered in the college,
the Science Engineering Program,
North Campus building plans, and
the Engineering College-Industry
Program.
For a Career
Abroad .. .
Enlightened American busi-
ness demands that its repre-
sentatives be specially
trained to handle foreign
operations. For a remun-
erative and satisfying career
ini
FOREIGN TRADE
or
FOREIGN SERVICE
give yourself the advant-
age of a year's training at
the American Institute for
Foreign Trade. Graduate.
level work. Advanced de-
grees offered.
For Further Informatiu
Write
Admissions Committee
American Institute
for Foreign Trade
Box S..Phoenix Ara.

Firemen Don Gas Masks
Fight State Street Fire

f

(Continued from Page 1)
In the entrance of the restaurant
and breathed deeply. Then he got
up and went back in.
All the while, a red neon sign
flashed the name of the restaurant
through the smoke. It stopped
only after the fire was under con-
trol.
Firemen hacked a hole in the
black-tan checked floor of the Vir-
ginian and snaked a hose down.'
Water was pumped in. It covered
the basement floor, over a foot
deep.
Crowd Store Front
As the activity died down, on-
lookers crowded around the store
front, Some.of them, who had been
eating when the fire broke out,
went in to pay their bills. They
were waved off by the distraught
proprietors.
Many customers in the store
when the blaze began refused to
leave at first. The interior of the
restaurant, still heavy with smoke,
bore the traces of the fire depart-
ment's presence.
Interior Intact
An inch of water lay on the floor.
Hoses twisted black beside food-

covered tables. An untouched cup
of coffee squatted beside a salad.
The counter in the rear of the res-
taurant was neatly laid with
spoons, napkins and plates.
Waitresses and cooks from the
restaurant picked their way back
in, to retrieve belongings. Two
firemen emerged, carrying the
cash-register, and took it into
Wild's.
Speculate Fate
On the wooden staircase lead-
ing into the flooded basement, two
white-clad cooks sat, speculating
on the fate of their clothing,
stored in the front of the base-
ment.
"Let's go in there," one of them
said.
"Don't be nuts. You get your
feet wet." They smoked cigarettes
in silence for a moment.
"Lousy fire," one of them said.
Back on the street, a woman
came out of the crowd and asked
firemen if she please couldn't re-
move her car. It had been sit-
ting directly in front of the Vir-
ginian throughout the hour and
a quarter of fire. Driving away,
she almost ran over a policeman.

FIREMAN PULLS HOSE THROUGH SMOKY BUILDING

JOBS IN WYOMING for the summer. Work
amidst rugged mountains, sunshine and blue
skies. Uranium, fishing, .cowboyin'. $1.00
brings complete information.
Write FRONTIERS, Dept. 16, 429 Majestic
Building, Cheyenne, Wyoming.
ANNUAL
SPRING
BOOK SALE
See the 5c each, 6 for 25c books
SLATER'S

FIREMAN DONS GAS MASK TO BATTLE SMOKE

HOSE AIMED AT BASEMENT SMOKE

CAREERS

for college
Psj
Ma
WITH EC
MA JORS
IN Ma.

women
ychology
thematics
onomcs
rketing

STUDENTS WATCH FROM BEHIND HOOK-AND-LADDER FIRETRUCK

4

Statistics
Engineering
If you have majored in any of these specialized
fields, we would like to talk with you about your
career opportunities in the telephone business.
Michigan Bell's management training pro-
gram offers challenging and rewarding careers

Yardley brings you

.,

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