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February 09, 1955 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-09

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TH MCHIGAN DAILY

PAGE E ORT

WEPNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 1956

PAGE KIGH? THE MICIUGAN DAILY

mm

CAN DIES :
VAL.E NT IN E
ORDER'
:, NOW ,.

Stern, Noted U.S. Violinist,
Performs at Hill Tomorrow

Isaac Stern, noted American vio-
linist, who will appear at 8:30 p.m.
tomorrow in Hill Auditorium, ap-
peared in the movie "Tonight We
Sing" which was a biography of
impressario Sol Hurok.
Originally, Stern was to play

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himself, but since the movie dealt
with Hurok's L arly career, the
script called for the violinist to
appear in a 1911 sequence.
Suddenly, somebody realized
that Stern would be playing him-
self as an adult, nine years before
he was born. The result was that
Stern played the role of Eugene
Ysaye, a great violinist of that day.
Prades Festival
Stern was one of the distin-
guished musicians from many
countries who received the honor
of an invitation to appear with
Pablo Casals at the 1950 Festival
at Prades, France.
Stern described the occasion as
"probably the greatest experience
of my life," and appeared with
Casals again the following sum-
mer in Perpignan and again in
Prades in 1952.
Stern was born July 21, 1920
in Kriminiesz, Russia. His parents
brought him to San Francisco
when he was a year old, and at six
began studying the piano.
Two years later he switched to
the violin and at the age of ten
entered the San Francisco Con-
servatory of Music. After his local
debut a year later, he made guest
performances under Pierre Mon-
teux's direction; later made ap-
pearances with the Los Angeles,
Portland, Seattle, Minneapolis and
Chicago Orchestras.
Concert Debut
He made his concert debut in
1937 and proceedeu to appear on
concert tours. With his Carnegie
Hall concert Ja-.. 12, 1943, Virgil
Thomson, New York music critic,
labelled him "one of the world's
master fiddle players."
Included on his program tomor-
row will bc works by Corelli,
Franck, Mozart and Paganini.
Tickets for the performance are
available at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Tower. They are priced at $3,
$2.50, $2 and $1 50.
The Theosophical Society
in Ann Arbor
presents
A PUBLIC LECTURE
''PERFECTION
OF MAN"
The public is cordially invited.
No admission charge.
WED., FEB. 9 AT 8 P.M.
Meeting Place: 736 South State
(N.W. corner State and Hill)

Information
On Vaccine
Kept Secret
The "extremely rigid system of
security" surrounding the evalua-
tion now in progress on the Salk
Polio Vaccine has been increased
with new elements, according to
Dr. Thomas Francis Jr., director
of the Vaccine Center.
In a letter to Dr. Hart E. Van
Riper, medical director for the
National Foundation for Infantile
Paralysis, Dr. Francis outlined the
security program which restricts
significant data to an inner staff.
Information is transcribed on
code cards with different persons
preparing the various sections of
the data. Once entered, data is im-
possible to interpret without the
code keys.
In an effort to prevent prema-
ture and inaccurate reporting on
the data, no preliminary evalua-
tion has been done, said Dr. Fran-
cis.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 7)
Coming Events
The Inter-House Council is having
Open Houses Feb. 10, 11, and 12 in
their offices, Room 3-D, Michigan Un-
ion. The hours are 3:00-5:00 p.m. on the
10th nd 11th, and 9:00 a.m.-12:00m. on
the 12th.
The Congregational-Disciples Guild:
Thurs., Feb. 10, 5:00-5:30 p.m., Mid-
Week Meditation in Douglas Chapel of
the Congregational Church. 7:00-8:00
p.m., Bible Class at Guild House, 438
Maynard Street. "Great Ideas of the
Bible."
International Center' Tea. Thurs.,
Feb. 10, 4:30-6:00 p.m., Rackham Build-
ing.
La p'tite causette will meet Thurs.,
Feb. 10 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in the left
room of the Michigan Union Cafeteria.
French 1 through French 201.-Every-
one welcome. Ici On Par19 Francais.
Alpha Phi Omega-Business meeting
Thurs., Feb. 10, in the Union. All ac-
tives are requested to attend. Dues will
be collected.
Christian Science Organization Testi-
monial Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall.
The Annu'al French Play: First meet-
ing of the cast for "L'Avare" will take
place Thurs., Feb. 10 at 7:00 p.m. In
Room 200 of the Romance Language
Building.
Sailing Club-Meeting Thurs., Feb.
10 for all past members. Plans for the
cng:irt semster will be discussed. Dues

PLEDGE PRANKS?
Sororities Investigate
Theft of New Signs

REG. PRICE
$16.00

Site of Proposed Medical Buildings

ABOVE IS A MODEL of the proposed Medical Sciences and School of Nursing Building by Archi-
tects Holobird-Root & Burgee and Giffels & Vallet Inc. & L. Rossetti. Plans call for (1) School of
Nursing, (2) Pathology unit, (3) bio-chemistry, pharmacology and Medical School administration-
Present buildings include (4) Kresge Research and (5) University Hospital.

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All pieces are nested in a fitted, velvet lined case. Set contains (2)
51/2" ruling pens, (1) 31/2" spring bow divider, (1) 31" spring bow
pencil, (1) 31/2" Spring bow pen, (1) 512" compass with straightening
device, (1) 512" divider, (1) interchangeable pen part, (1) inter-
changeable pencil part, (1) lengthening bar, (1) Lead box, (1)
Capsule box with spare parts, (1) Screw driver, (1) Extra handle for
pen and pencil parts with needle points inside, (1) case.
This is one of the finest values we have ever offered. Perfect for
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MAIL ORDERS FILLED PROMPTLY - CHECK HERE FOR C.O.D..
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PLEASE PRINT NAME
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MAIL TO: Shop-by-Mail Co, Dept. 101
2980 W. Davidson Detroit 38, Mich.

By JANE HOWARD
Somewhere on campus, grossly
misplaced, are the signs which
once identified front lawns of two
sorority houses here.
Presumably victims of fraternity
pledge pranks, members of the
houses are indignant over the loss
of the insignia, which earlier this
year bore the sororities' Greek-
letter names.
Alpha Omicron Pi and Chi Ome-
ga affiliates are both curious about
the pranksters. "It's not that the
signs themselves were so valu-
New Sales High
Reported for SBX
A new sales record for this se-
mester's Student Book Exchange
was announced yesterday after
book sales closed.
Totals showed net sales to be
$8,907.39 for the five-day sale, ap-
proximately $1,200 more than the
previous high, according to the as-
sistant manager of the Exchange,
Harvey Freed, '56.
Students who turned in books to
be sold may pick up their checks
and unsold books from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. Monday and Tuesday at
Alumni Memorial Hall, Freed said.

able," one coed reported, "but it's
annoying to think that college
students still haven't passed the
sign-stealing stage. That's little-
boy stuff."
Both houses suspect neighboring
fraternities of the thefts.
Each of the signs was bought
and erected last fall. The Chi
Omega insignia, found missing
shortly after the rushing season,
was first to go. "For a while we
tried to find out who'd done it," a
member explained, "but nothing
came of it. By now we've just
about given up."
AOPi's had better luck. Their
sign, firmly soldered, hung to
mark the Oxford Rd. house until
members discovered its absence
after the semester vacation.
"We've narrowed it down to two
possibilities," according to Mary
Stuart, '56, "and we won't give up
until it's found." Miss Stuart ex-
plained that an older AOPi sign
was stolen several years ago, and
recovered just this year by a
sharp-eyed member.
Fraternity members suspected by
the sororities enthusiastically de-
nied any part in the thefts. "In
fact," commented a wistful mem-
ber, "they're almost too enthusi-
astic."

For Sure?
CMCAGO (I)-The Weath-
er Bureau Tuesday forecast
with extreme certainty that it
will be 85 years old today.
An item which was trans-
mitted on its forecast wire not-
ed: "The national weather ser-
vice was created by a joint con-
gressional resolution approved
on Feb. 9, 1870."
Nelson Picked
For NACJob
Prof. Wilbur C. Nelson, chair-
man of the aeronautical engineer-
ing department, has been named a
member of the subcommittee on
fluid mechanics for 1955 by the
National Advisory Committee for
Aeronautics.
Prof. Relson is one of the 400
specialists selected for the 28 tech-
nical committees and subcommit-
tees because of their "ability, ex-
perience, and leaderships in a spe-
cial field" the NACA has reported.
These committees provide ma-
terial assistance in the considera-
tion of problems related to their
technical fields, review research in
progress'both at NACA laborator-
ies and in other organizations, rec-
ommend research projects to be
undertaken and assist in the coor-
dination of research programs.

Simes Hits
Perpetuity
Rationale
Prof. Lewis M. Simes of the Uni-
versity Law School attacked the
original rationale upon vhich the
legal policy against perpetuities is
based.
In the second session of the an-
nual Cooley Lecture Series, he said
that perpetuities (restrictions of
the transfer of property which ex-
tends more than 21 years beyond
the death of a specified person)
are considered illegal in England
and in many of the states here.
The original policy of the law
was that alienability (the right to
transfer property) was necessary
to ensure productivity of the
property. Prof. Simes said that
this is no longer a sound reason
for the rule, because conditions
have changed so that now inalien-
able property is not necessarily
unproductive.
For example, he pointed out, if
the subject matter is corporate
shares, the corporation has con-
trol over the property represented
in the stocks and bonds.
In the case of a trust, the pow-
er of alienation is vested in the
trustee.
Sale Allowed
Prof. Simes noted that in the
case of an emergency, the law
often allows judicial sale of the af-
fected property.
He stated that he is not against
the rule itself, and in his lecture
at 4:15 p.m. today he plans to dis-
cuss what he considers a true ra-
tionale of the rule.
Phi Tau HOuse
Still Unfilled
Due to a combination of cir-
cumstances, Phi Kappa Tau fra-
ternity is now advertising for po-
tential boarders, president Douglas
Donnan, '56, said yesterday.
At present the kitchen is unable
to operate efficiently because of
the small number of members who
eat in the house, he said. About
half of themembers work for
their meals, thus eating away from
the house.
In addition, many pledges who
will be activated by the end of
the week are not allowed to leave
the residence halls for the rest of
the school year because of their
contracts, Donnan continued, and
therefore haven't been eating at
the Phi Kappa Tau house.
While only 18 actives are living
in the 28-person capacity house at
present, the house should be fully
occupied next semester, Donnan
concluded.

I

E Jwill be collected.
lL~_________________ __________________

0

"Dress" Pruett
wants to know:

What type
of training
program does
DuPont have?
DONALD C. MILLER received his B.S. in Chei
cal Engineering from Ohio State University in Jun
1937. During the following month he started wo:
with the Organic Chemicals Department of Du Po:
at Deepwater Poinit, N. J. Since. then he has receive
and given many kinds of technicaltraining. Toda
Don Miller is a general superintendent at Du Pont'
Chambers Works-well qualified to answer question
about training programs for college men.

DRESSLAR M. PRUETT expects to receive his B.S. in Industrial Engi-
neering this summer from Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical Col-
lege at Stillwater, Okla. He is president of the local student branch of
A.I.I.E. Naturally, he is interested in selecting the best job opportunity
for a successful career based on his technical training.

Don Miller answers:

Training has many facets in a big firm like Du Pont, Dress,
and a great deal of thought has been given to make it truly
effective. We look upon training as a very important factor
in a man's career. We think that the best way to train a col-
lege graduate is to give him a maximum of on-the-job re-
sponsibility in a minimum length of time. That's the general
guiding policy at Du Pont, Dress.
Of course, each department varies this general policy to
suit its special needs. A new man being trained for produc-
tion supervision may first spend a year or so in laboratory
or plant development work. Or he may spend his training
period as a plant operator. Thus a man obtains firsthand
knowledge of his process, and establishes a bond of mutual
respect with the men he'll be working with on his first major
assignment.
A young man interested in sales is often first assigned to a
plant or laboratory dealing with the products he will later
sell; or he may join a group of trainees to learn selling tech-
niques right from the start.

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