100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 17, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, APRIL 17, 1953

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 17. 1955

A.._ ._ _. ___ _, ____

ACADEMIC FREEDOM WEEK:
'Who Shall Teach,' Other
Issues, Merit Discussion

ACADEMIC Freedom Week begins today.
There has been little excitement 'about
academic freedom on this campus for several
months. McCarthy has not accused anyone of
being subversive for a long time. Investiga-
tions of University faculty members and stu-
dents have seemingly ended.
But the problem of academic freedom still
exists. There are influential people on this
campus who believe that past membership in
the Communist Party is reason for dismissal
from the faculty. There are influential people
on this campus who would dismiss any "fellow-
traveler," (using their own definitions for this
word) whether he were indoctrinating others
with his political beliefs or not.
THE PROBLEM of "who shall teach" exists
at other colleges and universities, too. A
review of academic freedom issues in the past
year shows that not a few schools have dis-
missed faculty members who refused to dis-
close political affiliations they had severed be-
fore taking jobs at these schools. Failure to
disclose one's present political beliefs also caus-
ed the unjust dismissal of many.
Just because the McCarthys and Clardys
Censorshipo
Sets Danger
CENSORSHIP, whether in the name of good
taste or idealogical conformity, is an ex-
tremely dangerous precedent.
Recent events on three college campuses
demonstrate a lack of understanding of this
danger and also of the role a newspaper should
play.
A newspaper's duty is to report events ac-
curately and on its editorial pages to comment
on the significance of these events as it sees
them. Its columns should be open to anyone
who cares to express disagreement with its
point of view. It is not a newspaper's respon-
sibility to express the majority opinion (this is
the responsibility of an elected representative
body). It makes no difference whether the
community agrees or disagrees, it is only im-
portant that those who disagree be given a
chance to answer. This method is the only
way to insure honest expression of opinion.
Censorship is the surest way to suppress honest
expression.
AT CORNELL University a faculty group re-
cently placed restrictions on the college
humor magazine for an article ridiculing soror-
ities, while publication of the Illinois Technol-
ogy News was suspended by another group of
professors because it printed a cartoon and an
articles which the committee called "doubtful."
University of North Carolina student legislators
are currently investigating The Daily Tar Heel,
largely because they disagreed with its political
point of view. The paper, they said, is a "se-
cond Daily Worker."
U.S. Shouldn
Quernoy. i i
SHOULD THE United States go to war in
order to defend Quemoy and Matsu?
The answer is no.
Adlal Stevenson indicated in a recent speech
tliat we should defend Formosa and let these
small islands go. Perhaps, eventually, we will
have to fight. But why start a war over ter-
ritory that is described by the Secretary of
Defense as having little significant military
value?
The possibility of atomic warfare also enters
the picture. Would we want to unleash these
powerful weapons to defend obscure islands?
ALIENATION of our allies could be the re-
sult of the present policy followed by the
administration. These countries not only pro-
vide raw material but give us a source of moral

CURRENI
At Architecture And. . .
THE RED INN, with Fernandel
AT the end of this movie, the voice which
began it sings us the moral: God takes
care of his own-the simple, the pure in
heart. It is sufficient proof of Director Aut-
ant-Lara's skill that this pious and unassum-
ing moral fits so easily on his complex and
beautiful movie. For out of the combination
of murder mystery and fairy tale, ghost story
and farce, he makes somethink profoundly
simple and moving.
The first few scenes are a tableau of horror
and mirth. A lonely organ-grinder is murdered
for his little money by rude and savage coun-
try inn-keepers. His monkey is not so easily
subdued however. He leaps out onto the snowy
roof, bedevils them with his screeching, baf-
fles their clumsy efforts to dupe him, and
finally escapes into the night. This is, in little,
the whole movie.

and Jenners have calmed down doesn't mean
their smearing and indiscriminate investigat-
ing didn't have an effect.
The investigators were successful in begin-
ning a Red scare. While they sit back and
look over their handiwork, perhaps even plan-
ning the next step in their investigation activ-
ities, their procedure has seemingly fallen into
perpetual motion-it spreads from one cam-
pus to another, and competent professors fall
to the wayside,
ACADEMIC FREEDOM week should serve to
remind us that only a year ago the prob-
lem of academic freedom was very real to us
at Michigan and that the results were dis-
astrous: the dismissal of H. Chandler Davis
and Mark Nickerson.
The activities of the week will include dis-
cussions of academic freedom and political
freedom, the problem of conformity, and the
issue of constitutional rights.'We can more
ably work to maintain freedoms and to fight
political conformity and pressure if we renew
our contact with the existing problems at these
meetings.
--Pat Roelofs

"We Saved Four Million Dollars On The U. N.
Technical Assistance Program"
--

DAILY
OFFICIAL
B ULLE TIN

Y ' } :
_
.
f :. .

wI

;# c"

f 'Bad Taste'
ous Example

The censors have lost sight of the principals
of free expression and their respective com-
munities are likely to suffer. Students will be
more careful in the future about expressing
unconventional or briginal ideas. And censors
have forgotten the dangerous, if somewhat re-
mote, possibility that they have set a precen-
dent and similar tactics may be used to sup-
press their own point of view in the future.
CORNELL and Illinois committees declared
that the publications they clamped down
on were in "extremely poor taste." Censorship
in the name of "good taste" however, must be
more carefully guarded against than the less
subtle, methods of groups like the North Caro-
lina student legislature. The legislators ad-
mitted that they did not like The Daily Tar
Heel's opinions. But it is not unknown for
censors to define divergence from their point
of view as "bad taste". If this is not what
faculty members in Illinois and at Cornell
were actually doing, they have at least set a
precedent which can be -used to suppress
opinion in the future.
Freedom of the press, has, admittedly, been
abused in many instances. But the abuses are
the price (in the long run a relatively small
one) which democracy pays for the precious
privilege of freedom of expression. Censor.
ship is seldom a desirable method of fighting
such abuses, for there is no guarantee that the
censors themselves might not some day be
guilty of even greater abuses.
-Phyllis Lipsky

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
'Expeditionary Corps'
A Political Question
By WALTER LIPPMANN
1JHE President's decision, overruling the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to
reduce by 380,000 the number of men under arms, will have to be
examined carefully by the Armed Services Committee under Sen. Rus-
sell. Both at home and abroad many questions have been raised about
this decision. The most serious one is whether with the much smaller
ground forces, we are working ourselves into a position where the
only military choice will b% to yield or to have an atomic war.
This question should be gone into thoroughly. As the military cor-
respondent of "The St. Louis Post-Dispatch," Gen. Thomas R. Phillips
has been saying, there is a strong tendency in our current military
planning to reduce the number of soldiers and to increase the num-
ber of atomic weapons. He and many other informed men are worried
that this could lead us to a point where we had to do everything or
nothing, where we were no longer capable of applying power mod-
erately and locally, where there was nothing between a policy of non-
resistance and a strategy of annihilation.
The president has made it fairly clear, but not clear enough, that
this is not what he wants or intends to permit. His view, it would
appear, is that a highly trained but small force in being, with a
large ready reserve behind it, is suited to the geographic fact that
the United States must fight its wars across the oceans. While we
raise a massive standing army in the United States, it must always
take many months to transport a large army across an ocean. Presum-
bly the President believes that the army he favors fits this limiting
condition. We must suppose that he can demonstrate his case.
BUT there is another side to this question which needs to be studied
very carefully. What we are talking about here is an exeditionary
corps capable of being carried across either of the oceans, capable

(Continued from Page 3)
have 55 hours or more by the end of
this semester should make appoint-
ments for approval of elections for
Summer Session or Fall Semester in
the Office of the Faculty Counselors.
1213 Angell Hall.
Students are urged to have their next
senester's elections approved early. If
elections are not approved before the
final examination period begins, stu-
dents must report during the half day
preceding the time they are scheduled
to register. There will be no Appoint-
ments during the examination period.
Zoology Seminar. Prof. Alexander
Sandow of the Laboratory of Psysiology
and Biophysics, New York University,
will speak on "Effects of Bromide, Ni.
trate and Iodide on Responses of Skel-
etal Muscle" Mon., April 18, at 4:15
p.m., in the Natural Science Auditor-
ium.
Concerts
..The Extension Service Announces that
that there are still openings in the fol-
lowing class to be held Mon. evening,
April 1S:
The Kingdom of God in Retrospect
and Prospect in the bible,- 7:30 p.m.
Room 131 School of Business Admin-
istration. 8' weeks. $8.00. Prof. Emeritus
Leroy Waterman, Instructor.
Registration may be made before or
after the class I the class room.
School of Business Administration:
Students seeking admission to this
School as gradugte degree candidates
in the summer session or fall semes-
ter, 1955. must take the Admission
Test for Graduate Study in Business
May 14. Students currently enrolled who
have not yet taken the test must also
take it May 14. Each individual must
make his own application to the Educ-
tional Testing Office, Princeton, New
Jersey, to be received in that office
not later than April 30 ,1055. Applica-
tions for the test and test general in.
formation bulletins are available in
Room 150, School of Business Admin-
istration Building.
Mathematics Colloquium. Tues., April
19, at 4:10 p.m. in Room 3010 Angell
Hall. Dr. Jun-ichi Igusa, of Harvard Uni-
versity, will speak: "On the Theory of
Kronecker-Castelnueve."
Geometry Seminar will meet Tues.,
April 19, at 7:00 p.m. In 3001 A.H. Note
change of day for this week. Dr. J. R
Buchiwill continue his talk on "In-
variant Theory in'Groups."
Doctoral Examination for John Mar-
tin Clegg, Chemistry; thesis: "I. The
Preparation and Reaction of Some
O-Azidobaryls. II. A New Method for
the Preparation of Alkyl Aides," Tues.,
April 19, 2024 chemistry Bldg., at 3:00
P.M. Chairman, P. A. S. Smith.
Concerts
Student Recital. Meredyth MAnns, so.
prano, 8:30 p.m. Sun., April 17, in Au.
ditorium A, Angell Hall, partial ful.
fillment of the requirements for the
degree of Bachelor of Music. Works by
B a c h , Haydn, Purcell, Schubert,
Brahms, Strauss, vidal, Duparc, Saint.
Saens, Coquard, Hindemith, Peterkin,
and Quilter. Miss Manna is R pupil of
Arlene Sollenberger and her program
will be open to the public,
Student Recital. Donna Lou Wester.
berg, pianist, recital in partial fulfil-
ment of the requirements for the de.
gree of Bachelor of Music at 4:15 p.m.
Sun., April 17, in Auditorium A, Angell
Hall. Compositions by Beethoven, Cho-
pin Alban Berg, and Debussy. Open to
the public. Miss Westerberg Is a pupil
of Margn Owen.
Student Recital. Jean HonI, violist,
8:30 pem. Mon., April 1, in the Rack-
ham Assembly Hal, in partial fulill.
ment of the requirements for the de-
gree of Master of Music. Compositions
by Marin Maralas, Handel, Hindemith,
and Milhaud. Open to the public. Miss
Honri s a pupil of Robert Court.
Student Recital. Helen Stob, pianist,
will play compositions by Mozart,
Brahms, and Beethoven, at 8:30 p.m.
Tues., April 19, in the Rackham Assem
bly Hall, in partial fulfillment of the
requirements for the Master of Music
degree. Miss Stob is a pupil of John
Kollen, and her program will be open to
the public.
Events Today
Westminster Student Fellowship
Guild meeting in the Student Center of
the Presbyterian Church, Sun., April
17, 8:45 p.m. Program will Include show-
ing of the film "We Hold These Truths."
A supper will be held before the meet-
ing at 5:30 p.m., cost 5oc.

H3ilel: Hillel. GrAd picnic Sun., April
17. Free transportation at 1:15 p.m.
Cost' 85c. Food is provided. Make -res-
ervations by calling Hillel or contact-
ing any representative of the graduate
group.
Frosh Weekend - Blue Team floor
show. 1) Blue Team Mass Rehearsals--
Tuesdays, 6:45 p.m. 2) Blue TeAm Act 1
-Sundays, 6:30 pm., Thursdays, 6:45
p.m. 3) Blue Team Act 2)--Saturdays,
1:00 p.m., Thursdays, 6:45 p.m. 4) Blue
Team Act 3-Saturdays, 12:30 p.m.,
Thursdays, 6:45 p.m. 5) Blue Team Act 4
-Saturdays, 1:00 p.m., Thursdays, 5:30
p.m. Blue Team Stage Crew Saturday,
10:00 a.m.
Graduate Outing Club will meet Sun.,
April 17, 2:00 p.m. at the Rackham
Building. Come to the Northwest en-
trance in your old clothes.
South Quadrangle-Sunday Musicales.
Last progrm in the series Sun., April
17, at 1:30 p.m. in the West Lounge of
the quadrangle. Robert Kerns, bari-
tone, will sing selections from his Mas-
ter's Degree recital accompanied by Jo-
seph Savarino; Judith Arnold, pianist,
and a wood wind and brass quintet.
Public invited.
Newman Club will sponsor a movie,
"Francis The Talking Mule," Sun.,

Tues.
June 7
AM

Wed.
June 8
AM

SPECIAL PERIOD FOR
Mon. Tues. Wed.
May 30 May 31 June 1
71-10 PM 7-10 PM 7-10 PM'

Wed.
June 8
PM

Mon.
June 6
AM
DEGREE
Thurs.
June 2
7-10 PM

EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 28 to June 8, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time
of class is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates with a scheduled exam falling on June
6, 7 or 8 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
period. The instructor may arrange an alternate time with no-
tice to the scheduling committee.
REGULAR EXAM TIME

Mon.
June 6
PM

CANDIDATES

Fri.
June 3
7- 10 PM

Sat.
June 4
7-10 PM

R

Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

,'

Monday
Tuesday

Tues.
June 7
PM

REGULAR SCHEDULE
(at 8 Monday, May 30
(at 9 Wednesday, June 1
(at 10 Saturday, May 28
(at 11 Tuesday, May 31
(at 12 Thursday, June 2
(at 1 Thursday, June 2
(at 2 Friday, June 3
(at 3 Saturday, June 4

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Monday, May 30
Wednesday, June 1
Saturday, May 28
Tuesday, May 31
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4

SPECIAL PERIODS

LITERATURE,
English 1, 2
Sociology 54, 60
Psychology 31, Group A
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
Chemistry 4, 8, 23
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32,
61, 62
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
Russian 2
Political Science 2
Psychology 31, Group B
Botany 1, 2

SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
Thursday, June 2
Thursday, June 2
Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, June 8
Wednesday, June 8

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
td="12
2-5
Z-5

i't Fight Over
[atsu Islands

of landing in a foreign country
and of fighting a local war of the
Korea type. Now it is not enough
to decide how large such an ex-
peditionary corps needs to be, and
what should be its equipment, and
what are the logistics of its use.
There is also the question, ever
more impressive, as to whether in
the vulnerable areas of the Asian
periphery, a military intervention
of this kind is any longer an ans-
wer to the problem.,n
The radically new elements in
the problem are that these weak
and theatened states are sovereign
and that they are threatened not

strength. The United States can not stand
alone in a global conflict.
The United Nations may provide an answer
to the Formosan problem. This solution could
take the form of "independence, neutralization,
trusteeship plebscite or whatever is wisest."
Stevenson suggests that the United States
and its allies could submit a resolution to the
U. N. general assembly asking them to "con-
demn any effort to alter the present status of
Formosa by force".
A united agreement of the allies to defend
Formosa would greatly strengthen our position.
If the United States has to fight we would not
be standing alone-instead we would have the
force of allied agreement behind us.
-Suzanne Jessup

with orthodox invasion and con-
quest but with subversion and in-
ternal revolution. In this vital re-
spect the Korean war may not be
a precedent at all. For there the
aggression was external. Almost
everywhere in Asia it would be a
violation of national sovereignty
to intervent while the weak gov-
ernment is being subverted and
is falling apart, and it will be too
late to intervene if it has already
been overthrown. In fact interven-
tion against the new revolutionary
government would by twentieth
century standards be deemed ex-
ternal aggression.
FIFTyears ago intervention in
weak states was a recognized
practice. It was' often criticized
but it was not outlawed. The big
powers intervened to restore order,
to protect and to promote their
interests, and to prevent the weak
state from being drawn into the
sphere of influence of a rival
power. In this century interven-
tion is very nearly, if not entirely,
outlawed in principle by the Char-
ter of the United Nations and by
the Inter-American Pacts. It is,
more-over, effectively outlawed
everywhere in Asia by the massive
popular opposition to any kind of
western military intervention in
the Asian world.
When we study the problem
of an American expeditionary
corps-which is, I repeat, what we
are really talking about in this
debate-we must give great weight
to the likelihood that in a mili-
tary intervention on the mainland
of Asia we would find ourselves
opposed, directly or indirectly, by
virtually all the nations of Asia.
Intervention on the Asian main-
land is almost certainly no long-
er something that can be decided
upon in Washington alone, or for
that matter in Washington and.
London.
THIS dogs not mean that there
are not strategic points on the
Asian periphery-for example the
Malaya Peninsula and Singapore.
-where if worst came to the
worst, a military intervention
would be necessary and feasible.
But we should stop giving the im-
.-rnrinr t ou.h _ h rb + n .rnn

M.-I. 135
EE 5
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54
M.-I. 136
Chemistry 4, 8, 23
CE 21, 22
Drawing 2 Group A, 3
PE 31, 32
EM 1,2
CE 151
Ch.-Met. 113
PE 11, 13
Drawing 1, 2x
English 11
Ch.-Met. 1
Ch.-Met. 107
Drawing 2 Group B

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

Monday, May 30
. Thursday, June 2
Friday, June 3
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Saturday, June 4
Monday, June 6
Monday, June 6
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Tuesday, June 7
Wednesday, June 8
Wednesday, June 8
Wednesday,' June 8
Wednesday, June 8

T MOVIES

their only opposition, the inn-keepers have a
Franciscan monk.
The parallels between the monk, marvel..
.lously played by Fernandel, and the monkey
go beyond the simple pun. Fernandel's aston-
ishingly expressive face gapes in simian terror
as he becomes aware of the monstrous trap
he has blundered into; he shambles about the
inn with monkey-like agility trying to foil
his captors. The ultimate parallel, of course,
transcends these intriguing details: it is the
parallel which the founder of the Franciscan
order drew by making no distinction between
the purity and innocence of animals and that
of simple, good-hearted men.
This is not to say that the movie is goody-
goody and sentimental; far from it. Its vision
of evil is precise and clear. The travellers, fed
fat with arrogance and self-satisfaction, mock
Fernandel's desperate efforts to arouse them.
Drugged with the inn-keeper's sleeping po-
tion, they sneer at the reliquary he carries

Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig .....Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers ............City Editor
Jon Sobelofs........Editorial Director
Pat Roelofs....Associate City Editor

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the -con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflict L be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported foai' ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Fngi-
neering Building between May 2 and May 13 for instrucliien...
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied :music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any" unit
of the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulle-
tin board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as a iry neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulle;i'n board.

Becky Conrad ........Associate
Nan Swinehart .......Associate
David Livingston .. .....ports
Hanley Gurwin ...Assoc. Sports
Warren Wertheimer
..............Associate Sports
Roz Shlimovitz......Women's
Janet Smith Associate Women's

Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor
Editor

John Hirtzel ..... Chief Photographer
Business Staff
Lois Pollak........Business Manager
Phil Brunskill, Assoc. Business Manager
Bill Wise .........Advertising Manager
Mary Jean Monkoski Finance Manager
Telephone NO 23-24-1

Matzo Ball 8:00-10:30 p.m. Paul Brody
and 'his band. Refreshments.
Unitarian Student Group will meet
Sun., April 17, at 7:30 p.m. at the Uni-
tarian Church to discuss the topic, "Is
There Anything of value in Commu-
nism?" Transportation from Lane Hall
at 7:15 p.m. Refreshments.
Michigan Christian Fellowship. David
Watson will speak on "Christian: Re-d
formed nr Transformed 4:00 n.m. Lane

Dances will be featured. . 'nstruction for
every dance, and beginners are welcome.
La Petite Causette rr lets Mon., Apr.
18 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. l1a the left room
of the Union cafeterti. Scrabble en
francais.
"Political Applicatiouv s of Peacemak-
ing," John Ferguson %'ll speak at Lane
Hall, 8:00 p.m. Mon., A pr. 18. Co-spon-
sored by Lane Hall a n d the local Fel-
lowship of Reconcili ahtion.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan