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April 16, 1955 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-16

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PAGE FOUR

IIIE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, APRIL 16, 1955

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1955

DYED-IN-THE-WOOL:-
Levy Beginning New-Found 'Leisure'

By JOEL BERGER
You could call Stan Levy dyed-
in-the-wool independent.
He strongly favors both woolen
clothing and life as a quadrangle
resident.
Levy, a native of WiAthrop,
Mass., reviewed his past life yes-
terday as he sat outside the Inter-
House Council office in the Un-
ion. It was one of the rare oc-
casions in the past year that he's
beeii outside the IHC office be-
tween the hours of 3 and 5 D..
Starting Semi-Leisure
He was starting a month and a
half of semi-leisure, having been
succeeded as IHC president by
Tom Bleha, '56, the night before.
Evidently a Massachusetts sea-
coast childhood exerted a strong
influence on Levy in several ways,
speech excepted. He speaks Eng-
lish like a native of the Mid-
west.
"I love swimming, rowing and
canoeing," the brown-haired sen-
ior said with a smile. "But during
the Michigamua canoe party on
the Huron last spring, my canoe
hit the bank about every 10 feet
or so. In between it went back
and forth between the banks,
"As for swimming, it's my fav-
orite sport. But only swimming
in ice-cold Atlantic water, not
pools or fresh water. It's like div-
ing into a barrel of ice cubes.
"The only thing I miss here is
the damp, salty Massachusetts
air," he said, concluding his re-
marks on aquatic activities.
No 4rtistic Ability
"Along with no mechanical abil-
ity whatever, I have no artistic
ability," Levy said. "I paint by the
numbers, however." He has com-
pleted four paintings and is now
working on a fifth.
Levy, a charter member of East
Quadrangle's Quadrants honor-
ary, has been directly and indi-
rectly connected with IHC since its
inception.
His first connections with the
growing organization came when
he worked on East Quad's WEQN
radio station.
Moved Up In Radio
During his two-year stint there,

--Daily-John Hirtzel

STAN LEVY
... just a painter at heart

he went from announcer, through
disk jockey and program director,
ending up as WEQN station man-
ager.
"I used to play records between
five and six hours a week," he
said, "but I couldn't tell the dif-
ference among performers without
reading the labels."
Last year the genial ROTC
member served as Cooley House
and East Quad president. During
'the second semester of his soph-
omore year he was Cooley's pre-
sident, WEQN station manager,
IHC treasurer for six weeks and
chairman of the IHC radio com-
mittee.
"That's when I came closest to
flunking out," he admitted.
Married Young
Switching topics, Levy recalled
he was married at the age of four.
"I liked a little girl who lived
around the corner," he said. "So
my mother and her mother had a
party for us, with one of the little
boys acting as a preacher.
"You know, I can't remember
the name of my 'wife.' I haven't
seen her in at least 15 years," Levy
added.
A collector of nicknames
(against his wishes), Levy said
practically the only nickname he
never had was "Shrimp," although
he's "only" five feet seven inches
tall.
"Levelhead" Was "Dictator"
Among his past titles are "level-
head," (received in long-haired

Massachusetts because of his
crew cut), "Stashu" (Polish for
Stanley), "Pleasingly Plump" (gar-
nered as a child, the nickname at
that time speaking for itself) and
"The Dictator." The latter name
he got when he was a den leader
for the Cub Scouts.
However, Levy refused to di-
vulge a particular nickname which
plagued him through school in
Massachusetts. Having dodged it
successfully, it still hasn't caught
up to him here.
As for preferences in clothes,
Levy said he likes repp ties, dis-
likes khakis and thinks "pink
shirts, are ugly."
"And I never had or will have
white bucks."
IHC Stronger
Coming back in his conversation
to the IHC, he asserted the young
group "has begun to walk and
stand on its own two feet.
"We have made many strides
this year. Of course, we've still
got a long way to go. I think that
next year the thing to do will be
to profit from gains made this
year."
Following a future hitch in the
army as an officer, Levy expects
to do graduate work at the Uni-
versity. He would like to live in
the Midwest despite the lack of
salt water, he confided.
Levy stubbed out a cigarette
and returned to the IHC office.
Work still remained to be fin-
ished.

Co-ops Give
LOW Rates
To Students
Living in a co-op only costs ap-!
proximately $410 a year, a little
elbow grease and a lot of coopera-
tion.
Because cooperative living is in-
expensive, most students chdose
it for financial reasons. Compared
with the $750 average a year for
most University dorm rooms, co-
ops present an opportunity to live
on campus for much less.
No matter what type of room
you live in in a co-op, the rates
are the same. Additionally, the
rooms " are at the disposal of the
occupants to decorate as they
please.
All co-op residents are under
one semester contracts subject to
be broken by vote of the house.
Interracial Policy
"Each house is interracial, in-
terfaith and neutral in all external
political beliefs," according to
Rochdale Principles under which
the Inter-Cooperative Council op-
erates. "Since there is such a prob-
lem in Ann Arbor's discrimina-
tion against dark-skinned foreign-
ers and Negroes, 25 percent of the
co-opers are foreign," said Steph-
an Vail, president of the IAC.
There are many advantages in
co-op living other than financial.
The co-ops are open throughout
the entire school year, allowing
students to live there without ex-
tra cost. "Guffing," off-time
snacking, is allowed 24 hours a day
and there are unlimited phone
privileges. Students wishing to
live in a co-op during the summer
can do so for only $100.
Living conditions at co-ops are
unique. Under no supervision, the
co-opers do any and all tasks
needed in maintaining the house,
averaging about four hours of
work weekly. Food, however, oc-
casionally presents a problem
when an inept cook is chef for
the day. But, the co-opers are op-
timistic, usually relying on the old
adage, "practice makes perfect."
Fulbright Wimners
Three University students have
been awarded Fulbright Scholar-
ships for one year of study abroad.
The students are Yuzuru Take-
shita, Grad, Ulrich A. Straus,
grad, and Constance Darlene
Pokela.
Miss Pokela will study at the
University of Helsinki, Finland;
Takeshita at Osaka University,
Japan; and Straus at Keio Univer-
sity, Japan.!

Petitions
Petitions are available for
Engineering Council on bulle-
tin boards in East and West
Engineering Bldgs.
Necessary requirements are
included on the petitions, which
must be returned Wednesday.
Lutherans
Completing
New Center
Completing a new unit of the
Lutheran Student Center is the
primary activity of the Lutheran
Student Association.
The chapel which, to be finished
in May, will complete the center
started in 1951. The original unit
contained a lounge, apartments
for the pastor and a kitchen.
The campus LSA, one of ap-
proximately 500 other students
groups of the National Lutheran
Council, has about 50 members.
Ray Sund, '55E, is the newly
elected president of the organiza-
tion; John Emanuelson, '56E, vice-
president; Alice Johnson, '58N, se-
cretary; Roger Severson, '51E,
treasurer; and Prof. Paul G. Kau-
per of the Law School is faculty
advisor.
The group holds weekly Sunday
night meetings and discusses top-
ics related to religion. Speakers
from the University and visitors
are asked to lead these meetings
and student discussions are held
afterward.
The group participates in the
SRA and the Inter-Guild. With
several other student groups which
compose the Inter-Guild, they
hold religious services in the jail
and the old people's home as a
community service.
Monthly parties are held by the
student group and they participate
in the Intramural program.
"The primary aim of our group
is carrying out the activities of
the Lutheran Church at the Uni-
versity", Bruce Nordquist, retir-
ing president of the group said.

Prepare New
U' Calendar
For '56-'57
(Continued from Page 1)
vides for a one-day study period
to precede final exams.
Student objections to the pro-
posal hit on the shortened Christ-
mas holiday: "twelve days," one
senior asserted, "is hardly enough
time to open your stockings" --
and the brief pre-final study per-
iod: "how can anybody cram for
two bad finals in twenty-four
hours?", another asked.
As well as approving the Cal-
endar Committee's proposal, t h e
Deans' Conference okayed -next
year's spring exam schedule, with
a one-day study period May 31 to
precede tae examinations, which
will end June 14. Commencement
next spring will be held Sunday,
June 17.
This year's student representa-
tives to the Calendar Committee
have been Hank Berliner, '56,
Anne Campbell, '55E, Becky Con-
rad, '55, Bob Dombrowski, '55, and
Norm Giddan, '55.

,1

(Continued from Page 2)
Westminster S t u d e n t Fellowship
Guild meeting in the Student Center of
the Presbyterian Church, Sun., April
17, 6:45 p.m. Program will include show-
ing of the film "We Hold These Truths."
A supper will be held before the meet-
ing at 5:30 p.m., cost 50c.
Hillel: Hillel Grad picnic Sun., April
17. Free transportation at 1:15 pJn.
Cost 85c. Food is provided. Make res-
ervations by calling Hillel or contact-
ing any representative of the graduate
group.
Frosh Weekend - Blue Team floor
show. 1) Blue Team Mass Rehearsals--
Tuesdays, 6:45 p.m. 2) Blue Team Act 1
--Sundays, 6:30 p.m., Thursdays, 6:45
p.m. 3) Blue Team Act 2)-Saturdays,
1:00 p.m., Thursdays, 6:45 p.m. 4) Blue
Team Act 3-Saturdays, 12:30 p.m.,
Thursdays, 6:45 p.m. 5) Blue Team Act 4
-Saturdays, 1:00 p.m., Thursdays, 5:30
p.m. Blue Team Stage Crew Saturday,
10:00 a.m.
Graduate Outing Club will meet Sun.,
April 17, 2:00 p.m. at the Rackham
Building. Come to the Northwest en-
trance in your old clothes.
South Quadrangle-Sunday Musicales.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Last program in the series Sun., April
17, at 1:30 p.m. In the West Lounge of
the quadrangle. Robert Kerns, bari-
tone, will sing selections from his Mas-
ter's Degree recital accompanied by Jo-
seph Savarino; Judith Arnold, pianist,
and a wood wind and brass quintet.
Public invited.
Newman Club will sponsor a movie,
"Francis The Talking Mule," Sun.,
April 17, at 7:30 p.m. at the Father
Richard Center. Refreshments,
Episcopal Student Foundation. Can-
terbury House breakfastsfollowing both
the 8:00 and 9:00 a.m. services Sun.,
April 17. "Faith of the Church" lec-
ture, 4:30 p.m., Sun., April 17, at Can-
terbury House. Canterbury Hawaiian
Supper at 6:00 p.m., Sun., April 17, at
Canterbury House, followed by film, "A
Song of the Pacific." Evensong at 8:00
p.m. Sun., April 17, followed by Coffee
Hour at Canterbury House. General
business meeting, Sun., April 17, fol-
lowing supper and film, to elect a
treasurer.
Hill Sun., Apr, 17, second annual Mat-
zo Ball 8:00-10:30 p.m. Paul Brody and
his band. Refreshments.
Unitarian Student Group will meet
Sun., April 17, at 7:30 p.m. at the Uni-
tarian Church to discuss the topic, "Is
There Anything of value in Commu-
nism?" Transportation from Lane Hall
at 7:15 p.m. Refreshments.
Lane Hall Folk Dancers will meet
Mon., April 18, 7:30-10:00 p.m. in the
recreation room. English Country
Dances will be featured. Instruction for
every dance, and beginners are welcome,

1

Cometo Church
Sundcay

N

FRIENDS (QUAKER)
Lane Hall

MEETING

WUOM Gets
Radio Awards
Fbur awards for outstanding
educational broadcasts were given
to University FM 'station WUOM
this week.
Granted by the Institute for
Education by Radio-TV, two of
the awards were in the "regional"
category -and two in the "local"
category.
First place (regional) went to
" Red Man in Michigan," a series
by E. G. Burrows about the Indian
tribes of Michigan. "Eclipse," a
special documentary by William
Bender, Jr. and Arthur Jacobson,
giving the scientific, cultural and
legendary background for the solar
eclipse last summher, won honor-
able mention.
In the local category, "A Gallery
of Women" and "Fingerprints in
Music," analyzing the works of
outstanding composers, both re-
ceived honorable mention.
Board Interviews
Interviews' are now being held
by the Senior Board for seniors
interested in being class speaker
at the graduation exercises.
Applicants must contact Dee
Messinger '55 Ed., Martha Cook,
by Tuesday.
Presque Isle Lighthouse is the
second oldest on the Great Lakes
(1870). It has walls 12 feet thick
at the base, and towers 120 feet
above high water. Its predecessor,
inactive and standing nearby, was
built in 1819.

SQUARE
DANCE
TONIGHT
LANE HALL
8-12

11

FRED

WARING

and His Pennsylvanians

11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship. Visitors are
Welcome,
6:30 P.M.-Young Friends
Students will be picked up at Lane Hall at 6:30
P.M.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland I. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Study of the Book
of Acts.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M. Worship, "Can Religion
Know?" Dr. Abbey preaching.
5:30 P.M. Fellowship Supper
6:45 P.M.-Worship and Program. A panel dis-
cussion "The Ecumenical Student Movement."
Welcome to the Wesley Foundation Rooms, open
daily.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
Sunday, April 17-
9:45-Student class studies the letters of John,
11:00-Church worship. Sermon topic: "Lovest
Thou Me?"
6:45-Dr. David Voss of Toledo will talk on
"Early Christian Pathways around the Aegean"
with Kodachrome slides.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Schelps, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45--Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "The Christian
View of Man"
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Discussion, "Who
Made All This?"
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45-Worship service, Rev. Theodore Schmale
preaching. Sermon topic "The Risen Life"
7:00-Student Guild.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CHAPEL
1432 Washtenow Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Edward Sue, University
Pastors
Sunday Morning Bible Study 9:45 and 10:45
Worship Services 9:15 and 11:00
Sermon topic "Eager But Not Anxious"
5:30-Fellowship Dinner
6:45 P.M.-Film-"We Hold These Truths"

rFlr

I1

ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius A. Stephonou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.-Orthodox Stu.
dent Guild.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 AM. - 11.00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister.
Hear "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ ABC Net-
work Sundoys-1:00.1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
Canterbury Hawaiian supper at 6:00 P.M., Sun-
-day, followed by film, "A Song of the Pacific,"
and general business meeting to elect treas-
urer.
Sunday services at 8, 9, and 11 A.M. and 8 P.M.
"Faith of the Church" lecture at 4:30 P.M.
Evensong at 8 P.M. followed by coffee hour.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
7:00 P.M.-Speaker: The Rev. Paul Bierstedt,
Central Secretary of The Division of Student
Service.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8.7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily--7:00 - 8:00 -9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings--7:30
P.M.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group. "Emerson,
the Voice of Non-Coriformity" by Edward E.
Potter, English Dept. Mich. State Normal Col-
lege.
11:00 A.M.=--Services-Sermon by Rev. Edward
H. Redman: "Do You Dare to Make Big Plans?"
7:30 P.M.-Unitarian Student Group at the
Church.
Monday-
8:00 P.M.--Unitarian Laymen's League at R. T.
Brokaw residents-Mr. Dean Baker on: "Lib-
eral Religion and the Field of Journalism."

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DANCE
TONIGHT
LANE HALL
8-12

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GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
Sunday--
10:00 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-"The Grace of Giving"
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild
7:30 P.M.-"Christ Our Refuge"

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