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April 14, 1955 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-04-14

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THURSDAY, APRIL '14, 1955

TIDE MICHIGAN DAIIV

1MA"Mr

THURSDAY, APRIL 14. 1955.T..avt+.c T . i flAI..v-m A-r.~

Pz-aizn T~zaw

9

Wolverine Nine Shuts ut Titans, 5-0

Bengals Whip Kansas City;.
Yankees Maul Washington

'A TRACK TRADITION:
Diamond Ranks As Top Track Expert

By DAVE GREY -
Phil Diamond has become a
tradition on the Michigan track
scene.
The be-spectacled, ex-musician,
ex-German instructor has been
head- timer at Wolverine track
meets for almost 22 years. Since
his recent retirement from teach-
ing, he has been assisting Coaches
Don Canham and Elmer Swanson
at practices on an almost full-time
basis.
Track, to Diamond, is strictly a
hobby. Up until this year he has
never 'received any financial re-
ward for any of his work. How-
ever, since he has assisted Can-
ham in distributing track films
this winter, he says, with a twin-
kle, "I lost my amateur standing."
Amateur Deluxe
A Amateur deluxe would be the
best way to describe Diamond, who
never had much actual running
experience. Long study of the sport
and a keen interest in it has es-
tablished him as one of the lead-
Ing non-coaching track experts in
the country.
Diamond, who reigns as perma-j
nent recording secretary for the1
National Collegiate Track Coaches
Association, is the only non-coach
in the country-spanning organi-,
nation. He has helped a great deal
in this field, especially in putting
out detailed reports of the annuala
NCTCA Clinic.
His contribution to the world of
Michigan sports can best be shownt
ithat he has been made an hon-
orary member of the 'M' Club.
so coo...so light ... t
so right for summer

A recent incident where Michi-
gan officials were criticized for
being over-conservative in the
judging of times, makes Diamond's
claim that, "You can't call balls
and strikes from the third base
line . . . you can't judge them
from the. grandstand," even more
emphatic.
After graduating from Michigan
in 1922, the call of music took Dia-

mond into the professional world
as a pianist. He then became a
teacher in the German Depart-
ment here, while at the same time
managing an Ann Arbor music
shop.
The townspeople knew that
whenever there was an afternoon
track meet, the store wouldn't be
open. Diamond would be spending
his time at the track with stop-
watch in hand.

i

by
1W TO PARBert Katzenjteyer
Michigan Golf Coach

a a
of
PH IL D IAM O N D1
..Cinder Exper t
Wings Picked
I 1
To Retain Cuwp
lin Ice Finale
DETROIT (W - The advantage1
of home ice, where they haven't
lost in almost four months, makes
the Detroit Red Wings strong fa-
vorites to defeat the Montrealt
Canadiens tonight in the seventh i
and deciding game for the Stan-
ley Cup HockeyrChampionship.
Two rookie forwards have been1
rushed into the Detroit lineup,
Bronco Horvath and Johnny Bu-I
cyk. Adams has a couple of aces upt
his sleeve in Horvath and Bucky.
They were called up from the Ed-
monton, Eskimos champions of the!
Tkh- P n Tin i

(First in a series of weekly instructive articles, designed to help the av-
erage golfer improve his game.)
THIS WEEK: ADDRESSING THE BALLt
One of the most flagrant violations committed by the average
golfer is in the manner of addressing the ball. Common practice for'
95 per cent of the golfers I have seen is to begin their address byj
moving right up to the ball and lining up their feet with the intended
line of flight. Having done this, they then glance over their shoulder
to make sure they are aiming in the proper direction.
Ssuch procedure causes a golfer to line up his shot facing to the1
right of the hole. To correct this, he will swing from the outside oft
the line of light towards the inside, the result being a healthy slice.t
The reason that this comes about is that most golfers do not follow the
proper steps in addressing the ball. Before approaching the ball stand
well behind it and sight along an imaginary line from the ball to the
pin. Once you have done this, move up to the ball, keeping this linex
in mind.1
Now that you are ready to address the ball, there are three im-
portant points of an address pattern which, if followed regularly, will1
always result in a stance which has you perfectly squared away with!
the hole.x
1. Step up to the ball with feet close together and place the club-
head behind it, making sure that the leading edge of the sole of the
clubhead is at a right angle to the line of flight,
2. Place your hands on the grip, having a hold that is firm onJ
the club but not one of tenseness.
3. Place your feet in a square attitude to the line of flight. The
feet should never be further apart than shoulder width at the heels.
By following this three-point program-clubhead, address, grip,
and stance, you will assure yourself of a proper address to the ball.

Detroit Held t

to Three Hits

By Four Michigan Hurlers
By DAVE RORABACHER The only flaw in the baserun-
Behind the fine pitching of four ning department throughout the
different hurlers, the Michigan game d ed hen Cgine
diamond squad handed the Uni- game occurred when Cline was
versity of Detroit's Titans a 5-0 thrown out attempting to reach
drubbing at Ferry Field yesterday second on his single.
afternoon. Michigan's eight hits were well
The Titans started out in grand distributed throughout the team,
style with leadoff batters, Bill no player getting more than one.
Shook and Al Baumgart, garner- Three of these were good for two
ing base hits and Howard Mc- bases and though no longer blows
Laughlin getting a walk, the only were recorded the Maize and Blue
one issued by a Wolverine pitcher gave notice to its long ball poten-
during the afternoon. However, tial as several balls were poled out
the scoring threat was soon eradi- nearly to the fence.
cated as first baseman Guy Spar- Coach Ray Fisher made good on
row hit into a double play. his previously announced inten-
In the second inning second tion to utilize four pitchers dur-
baseman George Finn rapped out ing the contest. The quartet, cQn-
another single for Detroit's final sisting of Bill Thurston, Mark Fer-
hit of the day but he too was relli, reliable Mary Wisniewski,
picked off on a double play. From and veteran Dick Peterjohn, was
then on it was all Michigan as the amazingly strong and each showed
Titans were continually set down fine potential.
in order with the exception of the Sharp Curve
seventh stanza when McLaughlin Sarp Curv e
managed to reach first base on Possessor of a sharp curve ball.
Don Eaddy's bobble of an easy starter Thurston, who was credited
grounder. the win, showed promise of becom-
ing one of Michigan's top hurlers
First Inning Assault with the acquirement of a bit
The Wolverines started out with more control.
an evenlouder bang, Combining Ferrelli, making his first ap-
a fastg intelligent brand of base- pearance since painfully injuring a
running with hits at the oppor-i finger early in the Southern trip,
tune moments they immediately set down in order the three men to
built a soft cushion for the hurlers face him during the lone inning
to rest on, adding to it intermit-
tently. ! which he pitched.
d Dependable Wisniewski gave a
Michigan's scoring opened in very fine performance of strong,
the initial inning when shortstop
Moby Benedict and Captain Dan easy-going hurling before giving
Cline got on base via a single and way in the final frame to Peter-
walk respectively and were then john. And the latter during his
batted in by Ken Tippery's dou- brief stay effected two strikeouts.
ble. The score was raised to 3-0 by With two consecutive shutouts
Bruce Fox, who was issued a -pass under their belts the Maize and
and then made the grand tour with Blue now prepares for its next
the help of Dan Cline's base hit home game against the University
and some fleet footwork. of Toledo Rockets tomorrow.

By The Associated Press
Harvey Kuenn, Detroit short-
stop, led the Tiger attack with a
home run and a double, as Detroit
blasted four Kansas City hurlers
for ten runs on ten hits to over-
come the Athletics 10-2 at Kansas
City yesterday.
YANKEES 19, SENATORS 1
Southpaw Whitey Ford held the
Washington Senators to two hits
and drove in four runs while team-
mates Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra,
and Bill Skowron hit home runs
in the 19-1 New York Yankee
opening day romp.
Ford, who did not win a game
until May 15 a year ago, pitched
as though it were a steaming aft-
ernoon in mid-summer. It was one
of the biggest opening day parties
the Yanks have enjoyed since the
old days of Babe Ruth and Lou
Gehrig,
PHILLIES 4, GIANTS 2
Robin Roberts of the Philadel-
phia Phillies came within two outs
o frecording the second opening
day no-hit, no-run game in major

league history as he turned back
the New York Giants 4-2 at Con-
nie Mack Stadium, yesterday.
Roberts lost his no-hitter in
the ninth. World Series hero, Dws-
ty Rhodes, pinch hitting for .relief'
pitcher Mary Grissom, was safe
as Gran Hamner bobbled his
grounder. Whitey Lockman popped
to Hamner bringing Giant cap-
tain, Alvin Dark, to the plate.
Dark, on the no-ball, two-strike
count, lashed the next pitch into
right for the first Giant hit. Wil-
lie Mays struck out, but Monte ITS
vin belted a double that scored
both Rhodes and Dark. Trouble
appeared in the. making when
Henry Thompson topped a single
down the third base line,
DODGERS 6, PIRATES.1
The Brooklyn Dodgers warmed R
shivering opening day crowd of
6,999 weather-defying spectators
with a five-run assault on Max
Surkont in the seventh inning to
break a 1-1 tie and defeat Pitt*.
burgh 6-1.

weseern League.e
I-11.Scores

.

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The final tallies were recorded
in the fifth framie. Benedict reach-
ed first on a base on balls and
scored on Fox's two-bagger. Fol-
lowing a flyout by Cline. Eaddy
knocked out a single to send Fox
scurrying for home with Michi-
gan's fifth and final score.
Heads-Up Playing
The Wolverines' wide-awake
running paid off in three stolen
bases, two extra bases on singles
and advances made on flyouts aft-
er tagging up. Fox's third inning
score came as a direct result of
one of these gains. Stealing second
after being issued a walk, he took
third on a wild throw to place him
in scoring position for Cline's base
'bye,george!
Enjoy yourself-it's lighter than you
think! AFTER six o miats light on
h shoulders-light on budget!
"Stain-shy" finish, too! For
that "up-in-the-clouds"
feeling-go
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Y R(f
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Tio Straight

Cl CARE
~ODERN

TTE S
SIZE

DETROIT AB R
Shook, 3b ...... 4 0
Baumgart, If .. 4 0
Knittel, ss .,... 4 0
McLaughlin, c . 2 0
Sparrow, lb ... 3 0
Schmidt, rf .... 2 0
Finn, 2b........2 0
Schram, of .... 3 0
Hakstadt, p .... 2 0
Sullivan, rf .... 1 0
Ursini, 2b ..... 1 0{
Ursem ......... 1 0
Crissey, p ...... 0 0
23 0
MICHIGAN AB R
Benedict, ss .... 3 2
Fox, cf ........ 3 2
Cline, rf ....... 3 1
Eaddy, 3b ..... 4 0
Tippery, 2b .... 3 0
Vukovich, lb .. 3 0
Perry, If ....... 4 0
Snider, c ...... 3 0
Thurston, p .... ,2 0
Ferrelli, p ...... 0 0
Ronan, 2b ...., 1 0
Peterjohn, p ... 0 0
Myers, 3b ..... 0 0
30 5

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1
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