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March 29, 1955 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1955-03-29

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PAGESIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 29, 1955

MEET HER IN ST. LOUIS:
'Ensian Job Ends for Pizza Fan Lubke

By JANE HOWARD
"Let's see," she mused, "what
would be characteristic?"
While the photographer waited
she struck up various poses
around the Michiganensian office
-but none seemed quite right. For
Etta Lubke, '55, just finishing her
stint as the yearbook's managing
editor, it's not easy to hit on one
"typical" pose.
Although she treats it lightly,
Miss Lubke's University career has
been followed with interest and
admiration by a large segment of
campus. Roughly, the senior Eng-
lish major has divided her years
here between the 'Ensian office,
different League positions, includ-
ing a Soph Cab Central Commit-
tee job, and offices in Gamma Phi
Beta sorority.
Didn't Have To Be Taught
Asked what drew her to the
'Ensian, the Scroll honorary mem-
ber' recalled that somebody pulled
her into the yearbook office while
she was enroute to a Daily tryout
meeting-and she's been there -ever
since.
She thinks the job has taught
her "problems of disorganization,"
and something about getting along
with people. But at this point her
friends interpose, asserting "that's
something Etta doesn't need to be
taught-it comes naturally."
Often found at a typewriter or
with pencil in hand, Etta has con-
centrated on literary pastimes, and
hopes someday to hold down a ma-
gazine position. She admits she
has "whipped off some poetry"-
part of which won her a freshman
Hopwood award, but can't name
any , particular favorite authors.
"I change every day," she explains,
"like Austin Warren."
Ice Creamh and Anchovies
It's traditional, she adds, for her
'Ensian staff to celebrate its dead-
lines with ice cream - gallons,
and gallons of it." A confessed de-
votee of food, Etta admonished
"don't forget to mention pizza.
Love it. How? Mit anchovies. Love
anchovies."
This all started, she explained,
when somebody gave her an Ital-
Faculty To Honor
Top Law Students
Outstanding law school seniors
will be honored at a banquet at
6:30 p.m. today in the Union.
The law faculty will commend
the top students for high scholas-
tic achievement and service, and
the Order of the Coif will be
awarded the top ten per cent of
seniors 'graduating in June.
A number of students will also
de named to the Michigan Law Re-
view, a monthly legal magazine
published by students. Members
are picked by the Jaculty for out-
standing grades and ability.

-Dally-John Hirtzel

ETTA LUBKE
... "mit anchovies"

ian cookbook-and developed, at
one point, to her cooking pizza for
a crowd of 80.
A poster, with the caption "Meet
Me in St. Louis" dominates the
apartment she shares with Becky
Conrad, '55-reminding , friends
that Etta isn't forgetting her na-
tive city, or one of its major in-
dustries. ("One of my biggest dis-
appointments," she says, "was not
being here for my 21st birthday").
Travel, Music, Watercolors
San Francisco also appeals to
the slim editor. She might like to
work there, "gazing pensively. out
into the fog," and definitely plans
to travel through the United
States. Europe? "Don't believe in
it," Etta says: "see America first."
A Western trip last summer in-
spired strong interests in the work
of her "biggest, pet peeve: photog-
raphers." Another time-consum-
ing pastice, she notes, is knitting:
"Argyles, made to order for any
occasion."
Her friends have -more to say
about Etta, in some areas, than
she herself'tells. "She can play a
mean piano," one associate point-
ed out-and Miss Lubke herself
confesses a love for Dixielanl-
"probably because of my East St.
Louis upbringing."
She also "whips off a watercolor
now and then," and is considering
staying on here next summer to
begin work toward a master's de-
gree in Fine Arts.
Although she's' been credited
with a minimum of idiosyncracies,
Etta claims she has a "strange
compulsion to wake up, invariably,
at 7 a.m."-no matter when she's
gone to bed the night before.

She sees a few signs of un-
just paternalism in the Univer-
sity, but the outgoing editor is
quick to conclude, on the whole,
that "it's been a good parent: I've
been extremely happy here.
Adams Tells
Platform for
Regents Post
.'When the loyalty of a faculty
member is questioned, action is the
responsibility of the Board of Re-
gents alone," Paul L. Adams said
Sunday.
Outlining his position to the Re-
gency, the Democrat candidate for
the Regent post explained, "Man
is entitled to fair treatment and
shouldn't be prejudged by any
group."
Adams said that the Regents
could and should consult the fac-
ulty in such cases but emphasized
that it was the Regents' sole re-
sponsibility.
On the education problem Ad-
ams told an open house gathering
at the home of Prof. Richard Boys
of the mathematics department
that the University should be "ag-
gressively active" in meeting this
challenge.
Saying the University has been
too conservative in the past, Ad-
ams hoped to "inject a progressive
approach and have the University
move out to areas neglected in the
past."

Cadets Staff
Lookout Post
AtopU nion
(Continued from Page 1)
by the townspeople who were al-
ready keeping watch during a good
share of the daytime. It meant
that one of the most strategic
times, from the standpoint of pos-
sible enemy attacks, would now
receive a complete staff.
As this writer talked with
Wuerthner, who is enrolled in the
Russian studies program, he was
amazed at the organization of the
system.
All planes within an approxi-
mate five-mile radius of Ann Ar-
bor are spotted and vital informa-
tion is then phoned into Grand
Rapids filter station. At the time
the post was being manned by a
local businessman, one of a grow-
ing number of conscientious resi-
dents who devote two hours a
week at the observation post.
At 7:55 last night, the observ-
er picked up the phone, dialed
"Operator" and spoke an almost
magic word, "aircraft flash."
Speedy Relay
Within sceonds, he was talking
to Grand Rapids and relaying to
the civil defense operator the in-
formation on the plane. "One ...
unknown. .. low.. . no delay ...
(Code name of the Ann Arbor
post) . . . south . . . three mioes
" . flying west."
Wuerthner estimates that three
minutes is the maximum time it
takes from the moment the plane
is spotted until the information is
relayed to Grand Rapids.
At Grand Rapids, the plane is
immediately charted and is check-
ed with previous reports or flight
charts. If no planes are mapped
within a 10 mile corridor of the
spotted plane or within 5 to 10
minutes of the spotted planes
schedule, "scramble" alert is is-
sued to the nearest et intercep-
tor base.
Ready for Inspection
Within 10 minutes from the
time the unidentified plane was
spotted, fighters are in the air
and ready to do closer inspection
eqiupped with rockets.
Wuerthner said that this lo-
cal post probably spots about four
or five unidentified planes a week
which necessitate "scramble" calls.
Asked why these cadets take
time out from their sleep to car-
ry on these generally unrecognized
and unappreciated duties, Capt.
James Heckman, faculty adviser
for the cadet GOC "In their Air
Force courses, the cadets quickly
learn to appreciate the swift de-
struction that can come through
the air. Right now, they can do
something tangible to prevent
that destruction happening here."

-Daily-Esther Goudsmit
TWO DANCE interpretations will highlight half of the Third Lab-
oratory Playbill at 8 p.m. tomorrow and Thursday.
In the scene above from 'Those Who Wait," are Alice Kent, '56,
Jean Isaacson, '55, Rosemary Scanlon, '57, and James Stasheff, '56.
Together with two one-act plays, the performances will be held
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theater. The playbill is offered by the
speech and the women's physical education departments.
The Choreographer's Workshop has supplied the dances for the
works. The first is based on Prof. Marvin Felheim's lyric poem, "They
Who Wait." The verse notes the feelings of the universal soldier as
he goes off to war.
An interpretation of an old legend, "Why Chinese Boys Have
Short Names," is the second dance fare. The Chinese legend follows a
family's son to his death by drowning because it takes too long for
would-be rescuers to give his lbng name; hence the title.
Directors from the Workshop for both dances are Prof. Esther
Pease and Jeanne Parsons of the women's physical education depart-
ments..Scenery and lighting were created by Peter Wexler, '58AD.
On the prose half of the program, students will perform in Luigi
Pirandello's "Sicilian Limes," an Italian peasant comedy.
The second short play is Phillip Moeller's "Helena's Husband,"
based on the old Greek legend of Helen of Troy.
Reserved student tickets for both performances are on sale at
the Lydia Mendelssohn box office.

Future of Atomic Energy
Discussed by U.S. Scientist

(EDITOR'S NOTE: The bombs have
grown bigger and bigger since thatI
summer day when the first was ex-
ploded in the secrecy of desolate New
Mexico. Has science gone as far as it
can? Is the H-bomb the end? Here is
a profile of a man who was in on the
first A-bomb, and has seen all the
awesome developments since.)
By RELMAN MORIN
LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (k)-It is
less than 10 .years since history's
first atomic bomb exploded, and
less than three since that mighty
weapon was surpassed in power by
the far more terrible "H."
What comes next?
"The problem of military appli-
cation is not necessarily confined
to making big bangs."
Thbe man who was speaking
would say no more about what-
ever is taking place today behind
the walls of the scientific labor-
atory at Los Alamos. That's all he
could say.
Dr. Norris E. Bradbury is the di-
rector of the laboratory. He is one
of the "few determined people," as
a colleague put it, who kept Los
Alamos from disintegrating some
years ago-a little-known chapter
in the strange and terrifying story
of the great weapons race with
Russia.
He came in at the beginning of
that race. Where does it stand
today?
Bradbury is a man of guarded
language. He says he can give on-
ly a personal opinion which is:
"this country is indeed ahead, and
well ahead of the Russians."
As research drives ahead at Los
Alamos and other centers, new
weapons will emerge, and new
avenues to weapons will be opened.
For obvious reasons, nobody now
is likely to describe the forms they
may take.

However, as Bradbury says: "the
problem of military application is
not necessarily confined to making
big bangs."
Does this mean - that weapons
other than bombs or warheads are
in the making? Is a future enemy
likely to be hit by thermonuclear
radiation without first having
heard a "big bang?"
If so, how much will they be
used in the event of a third world
war?
Such a conflict is not easy to en-
vision. The great weapons have
never been used in actual combat.
The explosions at Hiroshima and
Nagasaki-mighty as they seemed
at the time-cause only a faint
flicker toward the instruments of
the future. Nobody can say, with
full precision, how the techniques
of war have been bent into totally
new shapes.
A consensus of military, political
and scientific sources, however,
shows these points
1. If war comes, the great wea-
pons will be used. Britain's Field
Marshal Montgomery has said in
an analysis: "we certainly would
use them ourselves, if attacked."
2. At the moment, there is no
complete defense against a hydro-
gen attack. In the ancient race be-
tween offense and defense, the lat-
ter is well behind.
3. Hence, both opponents will be
hurt, and badly.
4. The weapons race will go on.
Dr Edward Teller, one ofthe chief
architects of the H-bomb, has
written: "We may be led to think
that this accomplishment is some-
thing ultimate. I do not believe
this is so."
Bradbury said he sees a point of
diminishing returns in the use of
the great weapons in combat.
"If you have a bomb that will
destroy 10 cities, there isn't much
point in exploding a thousand
such bombs. There aren't that
many vital centers to destroy."
But even if your enemy did have
10,000 vital centers, could you risk
H-bombing all of them in any
short period of time? The problem
of poisoning the atmosphere with
radioactive particles, and having
them come home in "fall-out"
might very well arise from such
an attack.
BUFFET LUNCH
for $1.00
GOLDEN APPLES
TOWER HOTEL Phone 2-4531

.I

Y:

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

(Continued from Page 4)

Senior Society will meet 10:00-12:00
p.m. tonight in Room 3-L of the Union.
Attendance is imperative.
Frosh Weekend - Maize Team Skits
Committee, meeting Tues., 8:15 p.m. in
the League. All members must attend,
SRA Electorate-7:30 p.m. Lane Hall
Auditorium. Election of officers and an-
nual report.
square Dance tonight. Instructions
for every dance. Lane Hall. 7:30-10:00
p.m.
Coning Events
Frosh Weekend. Wed., March 30. Cen-
tral, 6:30 p.m.; Finance, 7:15 p.m.; Dec-
orations, 5:15 p.m. League.

La Sociedad Hispanica meets Wed.,
March 30, at the League at 8:00 p.m. Li-
dia Miguel will speak on "Aspectos de la
vide y cultura de Chile." Refreshments.
Student Zionist meeting Wed., March
30. Rehearsal of the Israeli dance group
after the meeting.
The University Club will have its an-
nual Tea and Coffee Hour Wed., 4:00-
5:30 p.m., March 30 in the University
Club Lounge. Incidental music, infor-
mal group singing.
Lutheran Student Association. Wed.,
Mar. 30, 7:30 p.m. Lenten vesper Serv-
ices, meditations on the Sixth and Sev-
enth words, Service of Holy Commun-
ion. Corner of Hill St. and Forest Ave.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Break-
fast at Canterbury House following the
7:00 a.m. Holy Communion. Student

and Faculty-conducted Evensong Wed.,
March 30, at 5:15 p.m., in the Chapel of
SAint Michael and All Angels.
Hillel. Wed., 8:00 p.m. Hillel lecture
series presents Palmer A. Throop, prof.
of history, "Influential Jewish Philoso-
phers of the Italian Renaissance."
Deutscher Verein, 7:30 p.m. Thurs.,
Mar. 31 In the Glee Club of the Union.
Scrabble in German, a skit, a film on
the Berlin Philharmonic under Furt-
wangler, special German refreshments
and folk music.
Holy Communion will be celebrated
especially for students at the Presbyter-
ian Student Center under the sponsor-
ship of the Westminster Student Fel-
lowship Thurs., March 31 at 7:15 p.m.
Pre-Communion supper at 6:00 p.m.
Thurs., March 31 in the Student Cen-
ter, cost 50c. Call NO 2-3580 by 12:00m.
Wed., March 30 for reservations.

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U.S. MILITARY STRENGTH AND THE COUNTRIES WE ARE COMMITTED TO DEFEND THROUGH VARIOUS DEFENSE PACTS.
Overseas Bases Back U.S. Pledge to Treaty Allies;
Defense Department Posts Military Statistics

By RAY HENRY
Associated Press News Analyst
WASHINGTON (P-The great-
est network of overseas bases the
world has ever known backs up
United States' pledges to defend
treaty allies.
The Defense Department lists
its total overseas military installa-
tions at 950, maintained at a cost
of more than 600 million dollars
a year.
They are manned by some 1,400,-
000 men-almost half the total
strength of American armed forces
-and are about evenly divided be-
tween Europe and the Pacific area.
Security prohibits pinning down
exactly how the armed forces are
denloved. and a full list of the in-

equivalent of six divisions in Eu-
rope, and the 6th Fleet patrols the
Mediterranean with about 25,000
men and 40 ships.
Four divisions of troops are inI
the Far East, three of them Army
and one Marine. They are backed
up by 14 Air Force wings flying
from 20 bases and the powerful
7th Fleet, now standing by in the
Formosa area.
Other large units are located in
such strategic areas as Hawaii, the
Marshall Islands and Midway in
the Pacific; Saudi Arabia, Tripo-
li and French Morocco in the Near
East and North Africa; and Puerto
Rico, Cuba and Panama in the
Caribbean. The 2nd Fleet has asl

America shall be considered an at-
tack against them all" and that
they would use armed force, if
necessary, to "restore and main-
tain the security of the North At-
lantic area." Original members
were the United States and Italy,
Portugal, the United Kingdom,
France, Denmark, Canada, Nor-
way, Belgium, Iceland, Luxem-
bourg and the Netherlands. In
1952, Greece and Turkey joined the
alliance.
The Rio Pact-Signed in 1947,
this treaty commits the United
States to repel any Communist at-
tack on Greenland, Canada, Mex-
ico or any of the. 20 nations of
Central and South America.

(Formosa), and the Philippines.
Although different in language, the
intent of all is the same: The U.S.
will fight to keep them free.
In 1953 the United States signed
a 20-year "aid-for-bases" agree-
ment with Spain, classed as an ex-
ecutiv agreepnent and not as a
treaty. The United States is not
committed in writing to defend
Spain, but the presence of Ameri-
can forces there amounts to a form
of commitment in fact.
Aldrich To Speak
On Mental Health

WeAUM NAoMm

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