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February 08, 1955 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1955

THE MICHIGAN lftAll.V

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PAGE NTNE
W-MMMMMOMMONEW

I

Fletcher Hall Converted for Womenrs Housing
By MARY HELLTHALER
Fletcher Hall is the latest of the
4M men's residences to be converted
into women's housing units, due
to the increase of freshmen coeds
registering over the past five
years.
Despite its location across from
*┬░athe IM Building, advantages arise
~a:4
s ' during the football season and for
other sport events, the enthusias-
tic "charter members" of last se-
mester claim.
This semester there are 12 new
coeds, making a total of 78 resi-
dents in addition to the house di-
rector, Mrs. Dorothy Parker, and a
resident advisor.
Fletcher Hour'd Athletes
Before the conversion, Fletcher
Hall was a residence for athletes.
During the football season, it also
r served as a training table for foot-
ball players.
According to Pat Bubel, house
president, Fletcher is filling a need
for a different type of dormitory
living.fTherresidents are either
wholly or partly putting them-
selves through college, and since
j A ?I no meals are served, expenses are
cut down considerably.

WOMEI TAKE OVER-More than 70 coeds moved into Fletcher
Hall this fall after the dorm was converted for women. Previously
athletes lived in the building and the football training table
was located there.

Half of the coeds either eat out
or work and eat at South Quad-
rangle. The other half buy gro-
ceries and cook their meals in the
dorm's well-equipped kitchen. In
this way the women tend to im-
prove their nulinary arts and be-
come budget conscious. Fletcher is
similar to a co-op house except
maid srevice is provided. All Uni-
versity regulations, such as the
sign-out procedure, are observed.
New Phone System
Due to the absence of a switch-
board operator, coeds arn. reached
by telephone through the Univer-
sity exchange. The women answer
their phones directly on the var-
ious floors. When dates arrive, they
must "buzz" info the rooms.
This system works out advanta-
geously for both parties, as the co-
eds are able to buzz back. Signals.
such as 2 "shorts," meaning "I'll
be right down," prove helpful.
Triples Prevail
Rooms, all triples except for two
singles, contain wash basins. They
are painted in various shades, and
the furniture is new.
Fletchel Hall is off-campus, and
a majority of the women work on
campus. Therefore, there is a one-
ness of spirit" and a "sticking to-
gether," despite the variety of
races, religions and backgrounds.
The coeds have a warm spot in
their hearts for the men who va-
cated Fletcher. Not only did the
men leave them their television
set, but also the money in the
treasury.

READING, 'RITING AND COOKIN'-Since meals are not served
at Fletcher Hall, many students buy groceries, and cook their
dinners in the dorm's kitchen. Barbara) Some (right) and Roz
Dolinsky quickly adopted culinary techniques.
Photos b' Chuck Kelsey

fYOU'VE
4
Probably wondered
what the
Student ConoPs
are all about...
At Michigan there are three men's, three women's, and one married couples' cooperatives
which house about two hundred students. Here are a few facts on how the co-ops work.
WHO OWNS AND RUNS THE CO-OPS? WE DO.
Co-ops are owned by the inter-Cooperative Council (I.C.C.), a corporation set up
and run entirely by the students who live or eat in the houses. Each member, new or old,
has one vote, and shares equally in all decisions: what to eat, how much to spend, how
much to work.
WHO MAY JOIN THE CO-OPS? ANYBODY.
Andbody who agrees to participate in running the co-ops democratically is welcome.
Members are accepted on a first come first served basis without racial, social, religious
or political discrimination. There is no pledge or initiation period.
WHAT ARE THE LIVING AND EATING ARRANGEMENTS? '
As a roomer, you are provided with a bed, closet space, desk, chairs, shelves, storage
space as well as the social space and eating privileges.
As a boarder, you get twenty meals a week, planned and prepared by you and your
fellow co-opers.
"Guffing", our traditional between-meal snacking, is one of our most cherished
privileges. Everyone has free access at all times to milk, bread, butter and jam, fresh
fruit, cereal and leftovers. Eggs and some other items are charged at cost.
Any member may invite guests. There are adequate laundry facilities. Co-ops stay
open during vacation periods and in the summer.
HOW MUCH DOES IT COST?
Each house sets its own budget. Average costs for the past semester have been:
approx. per week approx. per semester
For room and board $13.00 $208
For board only $ 8.25 $130
New members pay a $20 deposit when they join; it is refunded when they leave. There
are no other dues of any kind.
WHO DOES THE WORK? WE DO.
All the cooking, dishwashing, maintenance and management is done by the members;
each choosing the job he or she feels best fitted for. Any member, new or old, can be
elected officer: president, house manager, food purchaser, bookkeeper . . .
. It takes from four to five hours a week per member to run a co-op. The exact work
time is decided by vote of the house.
There are no maids, janitors, resident advisors or other paid employees,
HOW ABOUT THE LIGHTER SIDE OF LIFE?
Co-ops aren't merely an inexpensive way to live. The men's, women's and couple
houses have together a good number of organized social events. Our members, coming
from all kinds of backgrounds and from all over the world by working together get to
know each other really well. As a result, co-ops enjoy a characteristic tolerant and
informal atmosphere. No pressure is put on anyone to conform to a norm of dress, habits
or participation in social activities.
WHERE CAN YOU APPLY FOR CO-OP MEMBERSHIP?
The Inter-Cooperative Council-1017 Oakland-Phone: NO 8-6872

2

NEW FURNISHINGS-Rooms took on that new look too this
fall when new furniture was purchased for the building. Marjorie
Brooks and Shirley Weber are shown in one of the comfortable
rooms. All rooms, except two, are triples and contain wash basins.

K

i

Special Purchase Sale
IMPORTED
WOOL SWEATERS
Every Sweater.Perfect
Every Sweater Made in Scotland
SHORT SLEEVE PULLOVERS 95
Regularly 8.95 and 9.95
LONG SLEEVE PULLOVERS 95
Regularly 9.95
LONG SLEEVE CARDIGANS 95
Regularly 10.95 and 12.95
AN UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY to buy fine imported sweaters at prices
you normally pay for domestic wools. These are all full fashioned of the
finest merino yarns by Pride O'Glen of Scotland. The short sleeve pullovers
include novelty styles with cute little collars (as well as the classic pull-
over) and there are classic and bat wing cardigans. A beautiful selection
of colors in sizes 34 to 40, but not all colors in every size.
Just Snow Your I.D. and Charge It at

DAILY STORE HOURS:
MONDAY THRU SATURDAY
9.30 TO 5:3.0

GENEROUS PREDECESSORS-Thanks to the men who formerly
occupied the building, the women now have a television set.
The men also gave the coeds their treasury.

,

* IN LINEN
by Rosecrest

crest jacket.
sleeveless print blouse .,
crest Bermuda shorts
print blouse .
crest shirt .
sleeveless crest blouse .,

. 5.95
--5.00
.". 3.95
, . 5.95
. 5.00

Not shown

a romantic coordination

of color, prints, crests!

j .. You'll love the dyed-to-match coordinated theme of these rayon lined
casuals. Radiant crested styles, jaunty Courtin' Colors, good-looking
mnr.en nr;tc cat ae m tpel ere-.ls wit e cnI d rn1~.a

I

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