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March 22, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-22

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PAGE US

IM MCHIG DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 22, 1955

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAJIt TUESDAY, MARCh 22, 1955

LOCAL
Candidates,
Voters, Will
Meet Today
Ann Arbor voters will meet Re-
publican candidates for city posts
in several ward meetings today
and tomorrow.
Ward one voters will be the
guests of Ward chairmen Dr. and
Mrs. Joseph Sasaki at 7 p.m. today
at the Kenmore Restaurant. Can-
didate for alderman, Norman J.
Randall; candidate for mayor,
William E. Brown, Jr. and A. D.
Moore, candidate for Council pre-
sident will attend.
Candidate for reelection as al-
derman Margaret Towsley invites
sixth Ward voters to her home at
1000 Berkshire at 8 p.m. today.)
Ward chairman Mary Dunham
will alsdI introduce Ruth Dana,
candidate for reelection as super-
visor from that ward.
Candidates for alderman Dr.
David Dickinson and for super-
visor Elsa Rehberg will attend a
coffee hour from 9:30 to 11 a.m.
today at the home of Gladys B.
Hammett, 1425 Pontiac.

WCBN Makes Great Strides
As Campus Radio Network,

A-BOMB FORCES:
Archaeological Dating Plan Change

Davis Offers Suggestions
Based on Housing Survey

a;

Since its inception a year and a
half ago, WCBN, Campus Broad-,
casting Network, has come a long
way.
Originally, there were three sep-
arate stations, one in each of the
men's residence halls.
In September 1953, the stations
joined forces under the name
Neglected
Ann Arbor has been visited
by crown princes, Supreme
C o u r t justices, kings and,
queens and even Rusisian edi-.
tors:
It has been talked about,
sung about, praised and damn-
ed, but it's never before been
completely neglected.
But the nation which invent-
ed the airplane, the telephone
and the lightning rod has in-
vented Ann Arbor off the map.
The new /Great Soviet Ency-
clopedia devotes considerable
space to "Bei-siti," "Kalamazu"
and even "Maskigaon," but no-
where is there any mention of
Ann Arbor.

w~ r . +.. _. _. _ _ ._ . _t r .. __.

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b,
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KING SIZE SERVICE
Card to a Catalog by
Push Button
LOWER PRICES

"Campus Broadcasting Network."
They alternate broadcasting time
and are connected by lines going
through steam tunnels.
Twenty Per Cent Sponsored
Twenty per cent of its broad-
casting day, from 7 a.m. to 1 a.m.,
is sponsored, according to Don
MacLennan, public relations di-
rector for the network.
Individual studios are financed
by appropriations from Quad
Councils. Support for the network
itself comes from paid local and
national advertising.
About 95 percent of WCBN's
broadcasting time is taken up by
music, while five percent is de-
voted to news and special events.
The entire staff, numbering 100-
125 people, includes sports, news,
announcing, special events and
engineering crews.
Features New Studio
According to MacLennan, the
network's big feature is the new
studio in East Quad, a part of Op-
eration Ransom there. It is ex-'
pected to be functioning by the
end of Spring Vacation.
There are no scripted shows ex-
cept for dramatic productions such
as Thornton Wilde's "Our Town,"
which is slated for early April. Ad-
vertising scripts are handled by
the business staff, which solicits
and writes ads. Others are taken
care of by individual announcers.
"At present," MacLellan said,
"We are being received by the
three quads, Martha Cook and the
Hill.
"Our plans for the future," he
continued, "inclde more coverage
for more residences, such as sor-
orities and fraternities, and stu-
dios in women's residences and the
new dorms."
NCCJ TO Back
Photo Contest
Ann Arbor Roundtable of The
National Conference of Christians
and Jews is sponsoring a brother-
hood photo contest for April and
May.
Announced yesterday by Bar-
bara Lawrence, local NCCJ pub-
licity chairman, the contest will
include black-and-white photos
illustrating cooperation between
races or appreciation of the many
religious faiths.
Work of high school students
and those younger will be judged
in a Junior category, while others
will compete in the Senior division.
Eighty-one percent of all types
of industry are found in Michigan.

University scientists have been
forced to change their method of
dating archeological specimens,
The change was brought about
by tests on radioactive fall-out
from atomic bombs.
Prof. H. R. Crane, supervisor of
the Phoenix Radiocarbon Dating
Laboratory, said the change was
made after it was discovered that
fall-out was throwing off esti-
mates of ages of samples by as
much as 10,000 years.
Light Fall-Out
"We have had a light fall-out in
this area during the past week,"
Crane said. "If we were still op-
erating under the old method, we
would have had to stop working
during that time."
He pointed out the dating sys-
tem is based on measurement of
natural radioactivity remaining in
samples from organic relics.
Under the original method, fall-
out contaminated the exposed
samples during one step in their
preparation.
Gaseous State
To remedy the situation, a
method was devised last year for
keeping samples in a gaseous state
inside a closed system. Kept free
from fall-out, gas is piped into a
Geiger counter for analysis.
In this process, samples are
burned, the resulting carbon di-
oxide gas is purified and its resi-
dual radioactivity measured. Any
A-bomb fall-out that settled on
the sample before it was burned
is left behind.
The gaseous method, which is
also faster, has since been adopted
by most dating laboratories in this
country,
Fix Relics' Ages
The University laboratory can
fix the age of pre-historic relics as
much as 30,000 years old. It dates
about three a week, sent here by
archeologists, anthropologists, ge-
ologists, zoologists, and others
throughout the country.
Cosmic rays entering the earth's
atmosphere collide with atoms of
nitrogen gas, turning some into
radioactive isotopes or Carbon 14.
This is the key to the dating pro-
cess.
Plants and animals absorb Car-
bon 14 in the form of carbon diox-
ide during their lives. The intake
ceases when they die, and that al-
ready absorbed begins to disinte-
grate at a known rate.
It is therefore possible to treat
the organic sample and measure
its residual radioactivity. This tells
how many years have passed
since the death of the plant or
animal from which the sample
came.

-Courtesy University News Service
PROF. H. R. CRANE examines the bones of a long-extinct native
American horse, sent to the Phoenix Radiocarbon Dating Labora-
tory to be dated.

Two recommendations h a v e V
been offered as possible remedies,
for housing problems which con-'
front foreign students by James
M. Davis, director of the Interna-
tional Center.
Included in a survey recently
concluded by the Center, the sug-
gestions were:
1. That University housing of-
ficers, in cooperation with Inter-
national Center staff mmbers re-
view administrative procedures in
order to make it possible for a
larger number of foreign students
to live in dormitories.
2. Since dormitories are mainly.
for undergraduates and half of
the foreign students are gradu-
ates, that the University consider
providing dormitory facilities for
graduate students of both sexes
including both American students
and those from abroad.
A questionnaire sent out to the
foreign students on campus indi-
cated only one-fifth of the foreign
students rated their present hous-
ing as "excellent" while one out
of ten rated his housing "unsatis-
factory."
In spite of the year-long con-
tract and the food, which many
foreign students find strange and

unvaried. dormitories were ratea
as the best accommodations by
the highest number of students.
Rooming houses and apartments
were rated lowest on the scale by
foreign students.
Graduation
Sale 'To Start
S e n i o r commencement an-
nouncements may be ordered from
1 to 5 p.m. on March 28 to 31 and
April 11 to 16 at the Administra-
tion Bldg.
Co-chairmen Al Ewert, '55L, and
Hank Winkelman, '55BAd., of the
senior announcement committee
said announcements can be picked
up in May.
Commencement announcement
booklets containing a list of '55
graduates, a list of administration
and class officers of all schools, an
invitation to commencement and
scenes of the campus may be pur-
chased.
Also available w11 be engraved
announcements, name cards and
brass plates.

4

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