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March 17, 1955 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, _ MARCH 17, 1955

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I M e - !M=

Loafing

To

Head

Florida

'Curriculum'

Fashion Motto Switch
Brings Leg Exposure

I.

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A

By JANE FOWLER
With a curriculum including
water skiing, sun bathing and
swimming, the spying vacation
sessions of the University will
commence studies April 2 in Ft.
Lauderdale, Fla.-without profes-
sors, of course!!
Enrolling in the 10 day course
in loafing are 14 coeds who will
share apartments in a hotel on
the beach. Jan Walter, Jeanne
Hager, Darlene Martenson, Pat
Patterson and Ellie Sarraf will fly
South.
There they will meet Nadyne
Cooke, Bobbie Johnson, Marge*
Rout, Barb Shilling and Heather
Hutchins. Barb Grinnell, Sally
Burke, Sandy Lee and Sue Shake-
speare will also desert the campus
for the surf and join the group in
Florida.
Other University students in-
vading the Sunshine State include
Paul Howe, Joan Robertson, Fred-
dy Haynes, Donna Winstead and
Brenda Wehbring.
"Rest" Cure
Exchanging hectic campus life

for hotel luxury will be Marlene
Davis and Claire Zimmerman. Al-
so leaving the rush of Ann Ar-
bor for a 10 day "rest" cure are
Michigan men Jim Huritenlocher,
Gary Schneider, Ken Lloyd and
Jim Hague.
With a quorum reminiscent of
chapter meetings, members of
Gamma Phi Beta will convene in
Ft. Lauderdale. Virginia a n d
Mary Alice Robertson, Cornie
Von Mach, Nancy Perrin and El-
len Lauppe will meet with their
sisters, Joan Howlett, Jan Mew-
hort, Helen Schimpke, Dawn
Maine and Coleen Campbell.
Promoting inter-collegiate re-
lations, Carol Roth will visit the
land of sunshine with friends from
DePaul University.
Among the Sigma Nu's register-
ing for our mythical spring vaca-
tion session are Kent Robinson,
Con Michael, Jim Fenton, Lee
Sansum and Alan Reidinger. Oth-
er brothers making the trip to Ft.
Lauderdale Include Al Ewert,

Frank Lexa, Guy Martenson, Bob
Thorsen and Mitch Sams.
Mass Exodus
Larry Miller, Hans vonBernthal,
Dan Dahl, Reg Norris, Hal Franz
and Dick Scroggins complete the
list of Sigma Nu's taking part in
the mass exodus.
Also to be found on the beaches
for those 10 marvelous days are
Janet Winkelhaus, Connie New-
man and Wilma Larmee, all driv-
ing down with Marie Brumley.
The Phi Delta Theta expedition
will include Larry Kelly, George
Rich, George Clark, Phil Mitchell
and Jim Barron. Other Phi Delts
scheduled for a course in relaxing
are Andy Samosuk, Bill McArthur
and Tom Jorgensen.
Helping to bring enrollment on
the University's southern "cam-
pus" to a new high will be Rick
St. John, Dick Zimmerman, Cor-
ky Heatherington, Sara Bur-
roughs, Jo rrindle and Claudine
Abry.
Traveling to other parts of
Florida, Francine Stieglitz and
Joani Rosen will stay in Miami,
while Sue Mitchell will spend her
10 days at Del Ray Beach.
Fun Plus Work
Combining pleasure with a little
work are the members of the ten-
nis, track and baseball squads,
the Glee Club and the symphony
band.
While the band is appearing at
Carnegie Hall, the Glee Club will
be on a tour taking them to Cin-
cinnati, Nashville, Tulsa and Kan-
sas City.
Wolverine diamond aces will
meet the University of Delaware,
the University of Virginia, the
University of North Carolina and
Duke University during their
jaunt.
Thestennis team will have
matches at Georgia Tech and

Vanderbilt, with Michigan cinder-
man traveling west to compete
with Stanford.
International Flavor
Vacations with an international
flavor are in store for Judy Tat-
ham, Mary Jane Storrer, Connie
Vandeveer, Sonny Everett and
Jim Miller, who are Bermuda
bound, and for Frank Haig, who
plans an excursion to Cuba. Son-
ny will spend a few days on the
Yale campus' before flying to the
island.
Jackie Povenz, Ann Tittering
and Ami Brager-Larsen are anti-
cipating a visit to the "big town"
with a special week end at West
Point. Also in New York for the
week will be Lois Louthanx.
Crossing the Mason-Dixon line
into the deep South are Betty
Jean Kafka and Helen Ehrat, who
will fly to New Orleans. Rose-
marie Safron has slated a junket
to Texas.
Family Affair
Making it a family affair, sev-
eral University coeds will t a k e
trips with their parents. Joyce
Mendenhall will drive to the
Smokies with her mother and
father while Helen Louise Jones
and her family will tour Boston.
Florida will beckon Laurie Smith
and the Smith clan.
Going East for spring vacation,
Phyllis Erwin will set out for Wil-
mington, Del., and Washington, D.
C., a long way from her native
Alberta. Also going to the na-
tion's capital are Dotty McElroy
and Diane Mowrey, who have
great plans for canoeing on the
Potomac.
Getting a share of both the sun
and the snow, Helen Levy, Judy
Cushing, Mary Zimmers and about
30 fellow skiing enthusiasts will
make their pilgrimage to Aspen,
Coo.

By JUDY JACOBS
What prudes were they of the
1800's who to milady said, "Dress
so as to pass unobserved."
By 1900 the fashion motto dra-
matically switched to "Dress so
as to challenge admiration."
Yet, nothing called bathing suit
appeared until 1910, according to
the Ladies Home Journal. Best
described as monstrosities, these
suits were one-piece, sleeveless,
black, long-legged, high-necked,
and wool.
"Era of New Women"
The roaring twenties initiated
the "Era of the New Woman" and
the trend of exfoilation (defined
by our trusty American College
Dictionary as scaled-off). Billow-
ing in the summer breeze were
the bloomer bathing suits. Loose-
fitting and sleeveless, the suits had
knee-length bloomers which sub-
stituted for skirts.
Society of 1925 stood shocked
as women's legs were exposed on
the beach for the first time. In
1930 "A Decade of Charm" ush-
ered in the v-neck, new materials
such as celanese and jersey, and a
wide variety of colors. Many suits
were two-toned.
Two Piece Suit
The two-piece suit of 1935 may
have provided more freedom of
movement, but it did create a
figure problem. If you had a spare
tire around your middle . .. well,
it was just tough luck. These suits
were made of satin lastex, white
rubber, and of shirred cotton las-
tex. New innovations of the sea-
son were matching beach robes
and beach shoes.
Why did the strapless bathing
suit come into existence? To in-
sure mademoiselle of the 1940's
with a smoother tan. Social sig-
nificance? To make her more ap-
pealing in an evening gown.
Briefer and Briefer
Increased independence ,and
wider participation of women in
community and business activities
led to more freedom in bathing
suit attire. The trend was getting
briefer and briefer and briefer.
Fads came and went in the
bathing suit world. The fad of all

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Others that are
nationally advertised
in misses and half sizes
.Accessories
Skirts, Belts, Flowers
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MAYNARD STREET

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Read and Use Daily, Classifieds

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GOOD OLD DAYS

NEPTUNE'S DAUGHTERS:
Surf, Old Sol Can't Harm
New Crop of Swim Suits

fads in 1949 was the Bikini. Cre-
ated by the French, the original
Bikini was a scanty affair made
from two large cotton handker-
chiefs.
Strapless, boned, skin-tight,
moldable nylon and taffeta swim
suits were 1950 features. This
year's styles, with a few new in-
novations offer a flashback to
briefer flapper and bloomer styles.
In comparison to their sisters of
the past, today's women are defi-
nitely in the swim.
Prints, plaids and checks will
make news in bathing suits this
season, fashion experts have pre-
dicted. -

Sam Snead-NATURAL GOLF......
Jimmy Demaret-MY PARTNER BEN
HOGAN.-.............
Ben Hogan-POWER GOLF.........
Lamont Buchann-THE PICTORIAL
BASEBALL ....................

gooki

S - ..$2.95

$2.95

TESTING THE WATERJane Corregan models a gay cotton print
suit with bloomer shorts.j

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By ANN FRIEDMAN
Be she sun-worshiper or Nep-
tune's daughter, 1955's eager
beach-goer no longer need worry
about sun or water ruining her
swim suit.
Thanks go to a new blend of
nyloi fabric.
This. latest discovery ensures
form-fitting flattery and conItort
as well. The yarn is strong, fine
and resilient and promises to be
quick-drying and water-and-wear
resistant.
Wool Suits Absent
Although fashion magazines
have predicted a revival of the
flapper era in beach styles, not
one wool tank-type suit was seen
in local stores. Nor was there any
sign of the Dior influence.
Instead, the majority of suits
are novelty prints in gay cotton
or combinations of acetate, elas-
ticized , cotton and rubber, and
also the ever-popular lastex.
"Wool suits will probably never
be in style again," one merchant
commented, "because they do
nothing for a girl's figure. De-
signers have performed miracles
with the built-in wonders of the
nylon suits."
"Miracles" Performed
A local shop features one such
"miracle" in a suit with a shirred
bottom-assuring perfect fit for
the tall coed as well as for her
shorter sister. A row of white
beads along the top lends interest-
ing appeal to this simple black
lastex suit.

Gone are the days when swim
suits came only in conventional
solid colors and in just one ma-
terial. Designers are wildly com-
bining colors and using fabrics
unthought of for beach tog use.
Styles Varied
No longer of one common style,
today's bathing suit is varied and
individual. It is designed to com-
ply with the wearer's taste
Styles have changed very little
from last season's models. The
most noticeable addition is the
higher front, accompanied by a
lower back. The trend still fa-
vors the one-piece suit.
Hundreds of dancing ginger-
bread nien provide an unusual
variation in design in a cotton
suit displayed in another store.
This model has a ruffled skirt and
comes in delightful ice cream
colors. Vivid, striking jewel tones
are also popular.
Italian Design Featured
One shop carries a bathing suit
bearing a label that its ceramic
print was taken from an authen-
tic Italian vase design.
Cotton suits are priced from
about $7.95 to $14.95. The lastex
and acetate blends range from
$12.95 to $25.
From all indications, this sea-
son promises to be one of the gay-
est, brightest summers by the
beautiful sea. Practical, comfort-
able, and beautiful suits will add
to fun in the sun.

0i FOR SPRING..
S0 v O OO O O O O
Easter Bonnets, from 5.95 I
BLOUSES - SCARFS - BELTS - HOSIERY
. . . at . . .
Y 4e ee 1Pohemaj 450,
State Street at Williams
1;"~t t) OC~)! 't} t> tGomi> Q Ott= t

WaApo4

316 SOUTH STATE STREET

Louis T. Stanley-HOW TO BE A BETTER
WOMAN GOLFER.................$2.95
BETTER HOMES AND GARDEN GARDEN
BOOK...........................$3.95
Roger Tory Peterson: F I ELD GU I DE TO BIRDS $3.75
Montague Free-COMPLETE GUIDE BOOKS
OF GARDENING ..................$ .50

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