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March 17, 1955 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-17

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PAGE FOUR-

THE MCHHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1955

PAGE FOUR TINE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 17, 1955

. I

Long Ropes Make Jewelry News

Brief At The Knee.. .

By SUE VERB
"Baubles, bangles and beads" in
a myriad of rainbow colors indi-
cate a new fashion trend in jew-
elry this season.
White chalk beads will be as
popular as ever, with several styles
appearing touched with rhinestone
or gold baubles.
A particularly interesting neck-
lace features tiny pink speckles on
white. These beads are fashioned
into short chunky necklaces and
long ropes. Their shapes and sizes
are varied, too, combined in at-
tractive patterns.
One store displays an unusual
chalk bead medallion. The neck-
laces are also available in deli-
cate pastels with earrings and
bracelet to match.
Colors Combined
Pale glass baubles in shades of
violet, green, mauve and rose are
frequently combined with the
white beads to form rope neck-
laces. These are dusted with gold
for a soft, rich effect.
Ropes are also made of plastic
beads in vivid colors and interest-
ing weaves. They are frequently
adorned with fabric flowers or
fruit.
Copper jewelry will strike a high
fashion note this spring. One ear-
ring, bracelet and. necklace set
combines creamy white enamel
and copper in a striking effect.
Rich brilliant colors available in
other styles will offset a summer
tan beautifully.
Flowers Featured
Delicate sprays of ceramic bugs
and flowers make up one of the
unusual pair of earrings, which
show a trend toward larger shapes.
Other styles features tiny balls,
birds or butterflies pearched on
wire 'branches.'
Pearls and brilliant coral are
frequently combined to achieve

eral styles come in pastel shades
to match the composition bead
necklaces.
New to this spring's world of
jewelry is "colorama" a process by
which bright colored enamel is
applied right on the gold of brace-
lets, necklaces and earrings. j
This season, French enamel
blossoms promise to be big fash-
ion news. These imported earrings
resemble different flowers and are
available in rainbow colors.

Another new trend sees
"crescendo" earring, which
gracefully shaped to follow
curve of the cheek.

the
is
the

WHITE WILES - Adding a
sprightly touch to spring cottons
are these chalky earrings and
necklace. Fashioned in an exotic
geometric pattern the white
beads have an adjustable chok-
er back. The price is $1.
another interesting effect. The
shopper will also see pink, yellow
and blue beads in a variety of un-
usual shapes.
The always-popular button ear-
rings have grown up, with some
almost an inch in diameter. Sev-

Pleasing to the ear as well as
to the eye are the earrings and
bracelets composed of several lit-
tle drops which tinkle ike little
bells wtih a nod of a head or a
flick of the wrist.
Especially popular with Florida
bound coeds are the pieces of jew-
elry fashioned from sea shells and
tinted in delicate pastel shades.
An indication of the important
role that beads will play in this
spring's wardrobe is noticed in the
biblike effect given by wearing
several strands at a time.
Thus this season's jewelry will
form a colorful complement for
any feminine outfit.

SIMPLICITY THE KEYNOTE:
Good Taste Incorporates

Severa

I Elusive Qualities

By PEG DAVIS
Good taste is that elusive thing
which everyone tries to incorpor-
ate into his or her wardrobe. To

Fashioned in the Van Boven tradition . . . our walk shorts are as
comfortable as they are smart looking. Distinctively designed in a

variety of patterns and fabrics.
with backstrap.
Both men and women's sizes.

Available

in our plain top model

from 8.50

BERMUDA HOSE from $1.50
pan

pin point its meaning is extremely
difficult.
Greg Argus, '58, said "good taste
is simply clothes which compli-
ment the wearer," while Kay Leo,
'57SM, explained that "it involves
simplicity, good accessories and
appropriate dress for the occa-
sion."
Norlene Hermann, '58, would
label "the smart and uncluttered
look" as good taste.
Neatness, style and non-gaudi-
ness are Judy Jacob's, '57, three
principles of good taste, while to
Virginia Robertson, '57, a careful
arrangement of colors and conser-
vatism are the important factors.
The buyer at a popular Ann Ar-
bor store gave her definition of
good taste as "anything that isn't
too conspicuous."
The college set seems to agree
surprisingly well with the experts
on this point. The head window
designer in one Ann -Arbor store
says that good taste is "the ability
to make an outfit integrate.
He feels that the idea is not to
continually match, but to blend
the colors, using a central theme
and individuality. Three colors are
the maximum that should be com-
bined in one outfit.
Black and white are. not con-
sidered colors, but when using
them as background only two
other colors should be used, ac-
cording to this expert.
For a short girl, he suggests the
long line effect. This can be
achieved by keeping a single color
from the neck to the hemline. Let
the hat, shoes, a scarf and gloves
supply the color accent, he recom-
mends.
For the tall girl, an effort should
3e made to shorten the line by the
use of a bright belt or a large
handbag.
Thus, good clothes that are well-
blended and complimentary to the
wearer are essential in any defini-
tion of good taste.

Psychologists
Study Effect
Of Perfume
Coed Subjects Identify
Popular Floral Odors
Among Eight Samples
By DEDE ROBERTSON
When a psychologist starts in-
vestigating perfumes and their ef-
fects on a person, some startling
and interesting results are bound
to pop up.
In a report written by psycholo-
gists Bernard Locke and Charles
H. Brimm, preferences for expen-
sive or inexpensive perfumes are
interpreted and the ability to re-
cognize and identify certain ap-
parently well-known floral odors
is investigated.
Using 69 female subjects, all
chosen from an advanced college
course in psychology, the psychol-
ogists gave these women "perfum-
ers"-blotters dipped in eight per-
fumes.
Perfumes Classified
The subjects were then asked to
indicate whether they thought the
perfume to be an expensive or in-
expensive kind. They were also to
state if the smell was pleasant or
unpleasant.
Surprisingly enough, the ten-
dency was to declare the expensive
perfumes as inexpensive, rather
than vice versa. Every subject hatt
at least one choice correct, but no
one had all correct.
It is interesting to note that the
replies of those who had used per-
fume for five years or more show-
ed the same degree of error as
those who had not used it at all.
The frequency of use of perfume
also didn't show any difference in
the results, whether one qualified
as a frequent, occasional or rare
user.
Psychologists Report
The authors of the report con-
cluded that "There is considerable
disagreement between the indi-
vidual's evaluation of the cost of a
perfume and its 'pleasantness.'
There was a greater tendency to
attribute unpleasantness to odors
thought to be costly than to con-
sidering them as pleasant."
Of the eight perfumes chosen,
four were inexpensive, averaging
about five dollars per ounce, while
others cost 60 dollars per ounce.
Descriptions of the perfumes were
given in terms of "sweet, balsamic,
modern, sophisticated, French"
and similar words.
Publishers of a national trade
magazine for members of the frag-
rance industry, dissatisfied with
these results, presented a follow-
up on the study.
Odor Preference
They stated that odor prefer-
ence and perfume evaluation can-
not possibly be made on the basis
of a sniff from a blotter, or, even
worse, from a series of blotters,
one after another.
"A training in perfumery, an
exposure over a long period of
time to perfumes of all types, is
necessary before one can evaluate
from the brief order and quick
success. of scents," according to
these magazine publishers.
They mentioned that even after
the training "snap judgements
should not be given."
Reports Disagree
As further proof of the incon-
clusiveness of the report results,
the theory was stated that "there
should be a predetermined agree-
ment as to what constitutes "good
taste," but in this experiment
there was no evidence that either

the expensive or the inexpensive
perfumes were typical or correctly
priced.

t'

11

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screw back drops. All pieces pictured cost $1.

II
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11, 1i

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i

I ElI II

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