100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 08, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

#l'll lei QTA*v lursA r Q dK

" AXGR SM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VAGK sx~ THE MICHI~AW ~IAtTV WIviw aw~ a w ma a ~ww.

A UMMIJAY, rM4ANlIU3i ](15

-Daily-John Hirtzel

ARCHITECT'S PLAN FOR PROPOSED BUILDING

Ann Arbor Civic Council Plans To Build
Recreation Building With Coliseum

By BILL HANEY
One of the largest city council-
sponsored projects in the history
of Ann Arbor is in its planning
stage.
The Fairgrounds Building Com-
mittee, established by the council;
Is now selecting an architect to
draw up plans for a civic and rec-
reation building, on the Old Fair-
grounds on Huron street.
The 40-acre tract was purchased
several years ago on a bond issue
for $127,000. Last year Alderman
Norman J. Randall drew up a
plan which involved building a col-
iseum and an outdoor playground.
The building now under consider-
ation would require an additional
bond of $800,000.-
Gathering Information
The building committee is gath-
ering information to determine the
most advantageous uses for such
a coliseum. In answer to letters
Randall, now committee chairman,
has received suggestions from
thirty cities with recreation build-
ings similar to the one planned for
Ann Arbor.
Randall said, "We have cone
sulted University officials and pub-
lic schools in order to avoid any
unnecessary duplication of facili-
ties."
Based on accumulated facts the
committee is considering installing
skating facilities.. Randall ex-
plained,,"A check on present fa-
cilities showed both ice and roller
skating rinks are sorely needed
in Ann Arbor.
Ice Machine
"To remedy this situation we
would like to install an artificial
ice machine which-would operate-
'fromNovember to April. In April
the ice .would be replaced with a
temporary floor for roller-skating.
The over-crowdedness of the
Meadows Named
John R. Meadows of Ann Arbor.
has been appointed 1955 Washte-
naw County Chairman of the
United States savings Bonds Divi-.
sion of the Treasury.
State Chairman Noble D. Travis
announced the appointment of
Meadows, who is Vice-President of
the Ann Arbor- ;ank.
RENT-A-CAR
Standard Rates Include:
GAS and OIL
and INSURANCE.
p hone
NO 3-4156
LJCEW3 NO 8-9757
Nye Motor Sales
Inc.

University rink, is proof of the
need for additional rinks, he said.
Local authorities and those from
other cities with the same prob-
lem predict if interest in skating
keeps increasing at the same rate
as in the past three years Ann Ar-
bor ice enthusiasts will soon out-
grow their already-cramped fa-
cilities.
Theatrical Wing
The committee is also consider-
ing construction of a wing equip-
ped to fill the theatrical needs of
the community.
Chairman Randall said, "The
wing would offer a stage for our
Students Get
IFC Positions
Inter-Fraternity Council Com-
mittee, chairmen for 1955-56 have
been announced by IFC President
Bob Weinbaum, '56:
Chairmen are as follows: Alumni
Big Ten Committee, Charles
Chopp, '57E, Alpha Sigma Phi;
Fraternity Services Committee,
Max Holden, '57, Beta Theta Pi;
Office, Elwood Hansmann, '57E,
Theta Delta Chi; Publications,
Timn Leedy, '57, Psi Upsilon and
Walter Naumer, '57, Beta Theta Pi.
Public Relations, Charles Weir,
'57, Sigma Chi and John Moore,
'57, Kappa Sigma; Purchasing,
Michael Barber, '57, Delta Tau
Delta; Rushing, Fred Lyons, '57,
Phi Gamma Delta; Scholarship,
Al Williams, '57, Lambda Chi Al-
pha; Social, John Wylie, '57, Sig-
ma Chi; Office, Woody Hansmann,
'57E.
A tryout meeting for fraternity
men interested In working on the,
committees will be held at 4~ p.m.
Thurs. In Rm. 3-C of the Union.
Interviews for Junior IFC com-
mittee chairmanships will be held
at 7 p.m. tomorrow in the same
room.

Symphony Orchestra and local
theatrical groups which, at press
ent, -have no place to perform."
Randall added, "The main room
of the wing would also be used for
lectures and meetings and would
be equipped to show films. The
revenue from movies would be
used for the maintenance of the
building."
Still another possibility, though
not as probable as the first two,.
is a wing with serving kitchens
and additional meeting rooms.
The committee reported the ad-
ditional $800,000 is for the con-
struction of the building only.
Maintenance funds would have to
come from other sources.
Are Hopeful.
Randall, who actually fathered
the whole plan, said, "We have
high hopes that if the people vote
for this bond issue, the civic and
recreation building will be self-
sustaining."
He listed as possible sources of
revenue the Builder's Show, Gold-
en Gloves Boxing, Professional
Basketball and Junior League
Hockey games.
It is possible that, the project,
now officially called the Fair-
grounds Development, will be re-
named Veteran's Memorial Park as
Ann Arbor lacks a fit memorial to
its veterans.
The committee expects to com-
plete and report its findings to
the council a year from April.
Their requested appropriation will
then be put in the form of a bond
issue.

Pianist Talks
On Teaching
Musicianship
"A good mind is a great factor
in musicianship," Alfred Miro-
vitch, pianist, teacher and author,
said yesterday.
Speaking before a group of mu-
sic teachers and students in Rack-
ham Assembly Hall, on "The
Techniques of Musicianship," Mir-
ovitch said that "talent is only a
small part of a musician's equip-
ment, and not the most important
part."
Mirovitch felt that practice is
also supplementary to the mind
which is "in general, the rarest
commodity."
Keys To Teaching
The power of concentration and
the art of listening to yourself
play was what Mirovitch termed
the keys to the teaching of mu-
sicianship.
"Hearing is an automatic func-
tion of the body, while listening is
a conscious activity of the mind,"
he said.
Listing the elements of crafts-
manship, Mirovitch noted time,
rhythm, dynamics, tone color,
form and line, shading, style and
the use of the pedal as -most im-
portant.
Necessary Tools
The above tools were enumerat-
ed as "the necessary tools for the
mechanism of technique."
"The modern pianist sticks to
polishing the piece, but the true
meaning of the piece recedes, be-
cause -he has not used his tech-
niques properly."
"Essence, coloring and meaning
are important," Mirovitch added.
"In such an unprecedented devel-
opment in the arts as we are now
having, there must be a reverence
for life and all achievemelts."
"We should never forget that
many things in life can only be ex-
pressed by music," he concluded.
Yesterday's lecture was the first
of two, with the second scheduled
for 3 p.m. today in Rackham. To-
day, Mirovitch will discuss "The
Technique and Fine Art of the
Pedal."
Grant To Raise
Faculty Salaries
The Ford Foundation has ap-
propriated $50,000,000 to aid pri-
vate schools and universities raise
faculty salaries.
Schools to which grant funds
are offered will bedrequestedrto
match it with funds raised from
other sources. There will be vary-
ing ratios of matching.
The selection of institutions will
be announced only after analysis
of accredited or four-year schools
followed by recommendations of
a special advisory committee.

High in the Law Library is a
completely furnished room, little
visited and never used.
It is the library transplanted
from the home of William W.
Cook, '82L, who donated the en-
tire Law Quadrangle and Martha
Cook Building to the University.
Every piece of furniture, every
book and decoration came from
Cook's home. Even the walnut
panelling and door of the room
were those which originally bound-
ed his library.
Lined With Books
Three of the walls are lined al-
most completely with bookshelves-
filled row on row with fine edi-
tions of the works of famous au-,
thors. Shakespeare, D i c k e n s,
Twain and Kipling are examples
of the prominent lawyer's favor-
ites.
Paradoxically, only one law book
has a place in the collection of'
literature. It is the man's own
work, "Cook on Corporations.!'
Decor of the room reflects his
taste in fine works of art. Vases of
the Ming dynasty, and some even
older, line the top of one of his
shelves, along with a large Jap-
anese urn.
In the, corner of the room is a
Persian inlaid trinket box, done in
rich shades of deep green, brown
and red.
-Two marble busts of the French
philosophers Voltaire and Rous-
seau stand on either side of the
fireplace, their heads parallel with
the blue-edged mirror over the
mantle.
Around the top of the room is

For Dorms

(Continued from Page 1)
appear to be feasible. However,
the problem will be studied fur-
ther, Spiel said.
With $35 annually from the $50
raise, Shiel said, $220,000 per year
would be realized for early retiie-
ment of bonds. Therefore the final
retirement of the 1946 bond issue
will be 1962 instead of 1967.
Return To Men
Held to the Apr. 12 meeting of
the Board was discussion of plans
for a new unit to house 500 to 600
students. This would guarantee the
eventual return to men's housing
of all houses except Victor Vaugh-
an now being occupied by women.
A motion by Levy to have Chi-
cago House remain a women's res-
idence the first semester of the
1955-56 school year was passed.
However, Levy's motion said, the
house will be returned to male bc-
cupancy the second semester pro-
viding the Couzens Hall addition
is completed.
Miss Frank's motion that Flet-
cher Hall be continued as a wom-
en's dorm under the office of the
Dean of Women during the 1955-
56 school year was also passed.
The disposition of the residence
will be reconsidered again next
spring.

.

GHOST ROOM:
Cook Library Stands Silent, Unused

--Courtesy University News Service
COOK ROOM-William W. Cook's library In one of the rare mo-
ments when its door is open to people. Two law students visit the
room and inspect some of its books.

a border of elaborate Italian-style
wood sculpture of fruits, birds and
flowers. Over the door this forms
an impressive arch design.
Cook's Own Desk
The furniture in the room, al-
though not antique, is plush, lux-,
uriant velvet and brocade. In the
far corner is Cook's own ebony
desk, at which he spent many
hours of legal study.
From the skylight (the only, de-
tail of the room which was not
present in his home) hangs a del-

icate glass chandelier. Candles
with flame-shaped bulbs provide
light for the library.
The room is now usually in
gloom, locked and quiet. Because
of the addition being built to the
old room, which is usually visited.
only during law students' confer-
ences or on big game weekends,
Bargain!
A shoplifter found a good
bargain at a local dimestore
yesterday.
Marie La Chapelle reported
to police that she put her purse
down to look at some merchan-
dise. When she was done the
purse was gone.
It contained $100 in cash and
personal papers, she said.

Board Votes
$50 Increase

r
'I

i

CAMPUS CALENDAR

The second film in the Universi-
ty's International Film Forum se-
ries will be given 4:15 p.m. today'
in Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
Entitled "Freedom to Learn," thej
film considers the problem of
teaching controversial issues in the
classroom. Prof. Max Wingo, of the
education school, will act as com-
mentator.
Tau Beta Pi, engineering honor
society, is sponsoring a talk by
Harold S. Osborn at 8 p.m. tomnor-
row in Auditorium D, Angell Hall.
Osborn will speak on "Standards
-A Tool for the Young Engineer,"
indicating the reasons why a
young engineer is benefited by an
appreciation of the relation which
technical standards will have to
his professional work. He will also
discuss the various categories of
standards.
Osborn is being, brought to the

University by the Agnew Founda-
tion, sponsors of a series of lec-
tures on various college campuses
on the field of standardization.
* * *
Prof. Samuel H. Beer of Harvard
University will speak on "British
Politics" 8 p.m. tomorrow at a po-
litical science round table in the
Hussey Room of the League.H -
Prof. Beer is chairman of Har-
vard's Department of Government
and is a University alumnus.
March winds doth blow
Need a Hair-cut Joe??

. .

Fountain Pens
Greeting Cards
Stationery
Office Supplies
Typewriters
" * *
Steel Desks,
Chairs, Files

C3
+.w
C3
*sow
Q
C3

See
-Experts Serving You-
715 N. University

MORRILL'S
314 S. State Ph. NO 8-7177
Open Saturday 'til 5 P.M.

' r.-.-.--.- ----

Chicago College of
OPTOMETRY
Serving aen
Attractive Pro fesson
Doctor of Optometry
DEGREE
IN THREE YEARS
Professional Recognition by U.S.
Dept. of De. and Sel. Service,
Two Large Eye Clinics
University Environment. New
Dorms and Apartments on large
adjoining I. I.T. Campus.
Your Liberal Arts Credits Ap.
plicable for Entrance (60 Semes.
ter Credits in Specified Courses.)
CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
3243 South Michigan Avenue
TechnologyCenter, Chicago 16,".

PRINTING'
KING SIZE SERVICE
Card to a Catalog by
Push Button
LOWER PRICES
QUALITY PRINTING
PHONE-NO 2-1013
a-

was"

STEP RIGHT UP FOR LUCKY DROODL1ES

wammamwam am=

A

I

HAT SHELF IN CHINESE HABERDASHERY
Roger Beach Pierson
Untversity of Virginia

l

~VVV

PYRAMID BUILT BY
CRAZY MIXED-UP PHARAOH
Wayne Edwards
Texas A. & M.

(

Quality Strings,
Expert Repairs
and Adjustments
FINE BOW
RE-HAIRING
STRING SHOP
211 South State
Phone NO 3-3874

. ....
.... ..
- ----
--

I_________
... w .____

i

I

I

I

it

YOUR
BALFOUR
CHECK LIST

11

ADVENTURE5
TRAVEL to every corner of
*h globe . .. Europe (60 days,
$650 Including steamer), Latin
America. the Orient. Around the

Do you need .. .
j Favors
1,' Programs
k Beer Mugs
j Stationery
y, Paddles
Y 1955 Christmas Cards
W Sweatshirts - T Shirts
y. Pledge Cards
W Special Occasion Favors-
Scholarship Awards
jv Officer Charms
po~ Pledge Pins
y' Matches
j/ Napkins

Bring in
YOUR
SHIRTS

ENJOY YOURSELF to the hilt whenever you smoke.
Simply light up a Lucky and get Luckies' famous bet-
ter taste. Luckies taste better for good reasons. First
of all, Lucky Strike means fine tobacco. Then, that
tobacco is toasted to taste better. "It's Toasted "-the
famous Lucky Strike process-tones up Luckies' light,
mild, good-tasting tobacco to make it taste even better.
Now for the Droodle above, titled: Better-tasting
Lucky smoke puffed by modern sculptor. Make a
monumental discovery. Next time you buy cigarettes,
try the better-tasting cigarette ... Lucky Strike.
DROODLES, Copyright 1968 by Roger Price

WOMAN WITH LARGE FEATHER ON HAT
FALLING INTO MANHOLE'
Maxine S wrttz
University of Pennsvlvanta
NON-CONFORMIST RAINDROP
Jana Haley y
Washington University

5 1

,to
4 IA

UPPER BUNK SEEN FROM LOWER BUNK
Nancy Collins
University of Vermont.

iLUCKY:

Dry Cleaning
Laundry

.."" " &"-. .~v v rw
r, :..:I 4NWi

4

'til 9:00 P.M. Daily

elm) -, 1 1.

u

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan