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March 02, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-03-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE M

THE MCHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 1955

PAGE SIX THE 1~flCIIIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. MARCH 2.1955
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MUSICAL SATIRES:
Anna Russell To Return
With Twin Performances

",

Anna Russell, famed interna-
tional comedienne, will return to
Ann Arbor with her one-woman
show for the second time in eight
months for two different perform-
ances Friday.
Described by a critic as "a splen-
did blonde monolith with a face as
flexible as a collapsible camp
chair," Miss Russell's satires have
won her plaudits as "one of the
world's greatest entertainers."
Miss Russell intended to be a
serious musician, but a series of
incidents caused her to switch to
rollicking musical satires.
Incidents Caused Switch
One of these incidents came aft-
er she was graduated from the
Royal College of Music in London.
She had been engaged by a con-
ductor to sing the Card Scene
from "Carmen," in which the gyp-
sy heroine foresees her lover's and
her own death in the cards.
Miss Russell had a conception of
the tragic drama of the scene. The
sight of the tall, strapping young
woman with bounding cheerfulness
groping in her dress for the cards
was too much for the audience.
What finally put an end to her
operatic cai'eer was a performance
of "Cavalleria Rusticana." Play-
ing Santuzza, she brought the
scenery tumbling down when the
tenor, about half her size, shoved
her in a climactic scene and she
crashed into the prop church.
Repertoire Not Restricted
Her repetoire is in no way re-
stricted to the world of opera. She
also discusses the intensely psy-
choneurotic popular singer whose
only possible end is the strait jack-
et, the South American singer-
dancer and the hay-fever plagued
Union Opera.
Scenarios Due
Only nine days remain until
deadline time for scenarios for the
Union Opera.
The script contest is open to
all male University students. Peti-
tions accompanying the scenario
may be picked up at the main desk
of the Union.
According to Opera chairman
Jay Grant, '55, six petitions have
been taken out so far. He asks au-
thors to turn their scripts in early.
Additional information can be
obtained from Grant at NO 3-5347.

president of a woman's music club.
In addition to her recitals, Miss
Russell has also appeared on tele-
vision, Broadway and as a soloist
with leading symphony orchestras
throughout the country.
Tickets for Miss Russell's per-
formances at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. in
Hill Auditorium are priced at $1
for main floor and first balcony
and 50 cents for second balcony.
They are on sale from members
of* the Michigan Singers and at
Rm. 3519 Administration Bldg.
Panhel Asks
For Change
A new method of choosing offi-
cers and a requirement that dele-
gates to Panhellenic Association be
sorority presidents are among pro-
posed revisions in the Panhel con-
stitution.
Presented at a board of dele-
gates meeting earlier this week,
the new constitution must get ap-
proval of individual sororities and
the Student Affairs Committee be-
fore going into effect.
Group lakes Slate
The new constitution provides
for the election of officers from a
slate drawn up by the executive
council. Sorority presidents would
vote on the slate after consulta-
tion with their houses.
Nominations for offices can also
be made from the floor when the
slate is presented and one week
later when the vote is taken. This
method is similar to the one now
used by the Interfraternity Coun-
cil.
Present System
Under the present constitution
the president is elected by a vote
of all sorority women while other
executive officers are chosen by
the old executive board, with the
approval of the board of delegates.
Rationale behind the proposal
that house presidents must act as
delegates is that thr president is
usually the most well-informed
member of the house, according to
Panhel treasurer Jeri Fox, '55.
A provision is included for
transfer students whose sororities
have local chapters. They are en-
titled to the same status in Pan-
hel as actives is also included in
the revised document.

CAMPUS
CALENDAR
"THE GUARANTEED Annual
Wage" will be the topic of Prof.
William Haber's lecture at 8 p.m.
today in the East Lecture Rm. in
Rackham.
* * *
THE PRE-MEDICAL Society'
will meet at 7:30 p.m. today in
Auditorium C, Angell Hall.
Following a short business meet-
ing Josepha Meincke of the Hos-
pital School will lecture about
"The Essence of Medical Culture."
A movie will follow.
* * *
H. D. DES DARDENNE, editor
of the monthly McCall's-S.M.T.
Ad-Planner Service, will discuss
"The Magazine and Modern Mer-
chandising" at 3 p.m. today in
Rm. 141, Business Administration
Bldg.
HENRI BRUGMANS, Rector of
the College of Europ' Bruigec' Bel-
gium, will speak at 4:15 today at
Rackham Amphitheater. Subject
of his talk, which is sponsored by
the political science department,
will be "Problems and Prospects
of European Union."

Generation
Positions on the editorial and
business staffs of the Genera-
tion will be discussed during a
meeting at 3:15 p.m. today in
the Generaion office at the
Student Publications Bldg.
Students interested in crea-
tive writing, art or music are
invited to attend. No previous
experience is necessary.
Those unable to attend may
contact the Generation editor.

Lavalle Shall

Trade Boundaries Cause
Problem, Says Hamilton

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4

Daily-Dick Gaskiil
NEARING DEADLINE-Carey Wall, 58, Eunice Richards, '58 and
Jennie Gibson, '58 file and index cards containing 18,000 names
which will appear in this year's 'Ensian. Today and tomorrow
are the last days the yearbook will be on sale for $6.50, before
prices rise to $7.00. Campus-wide sales will take place 8 a.m. to
4 p.m. at the Union, Engine Arch, Women's Athletic Bldg. and
Diag. '
SPEAKER SHORTAGE:
Cancel Mott Lecture Series

Direct Bands
Band of America conductor Paul
Lavalle will direct three Ann Ar-
bor bands in the annual Bands in
Review program tomorrow in Hill
Auditorium.
Participating bands are from
Ann Arbor High School, Slausson
Junior High School and Tappan
Junior High School.
A University saxophone quartet
will play, while master of ceremo-
nies for the program will be Steve
Filipiak.
Tickets are available from any
school band member, the Lions
Club and local music stores.

Competitive nationalist trade
boundaries which have outlived
their purpose and are now only a
nuisance have forced corporations
to take evasive steps which may
become a threat to national se-
curity, according to Washington,
D.C., attorney Walter H. Hamil-
ton.
In his William W. Cook lecture
yesterday, Hamilton said "the
danger lies in the fact that citi-
zens of another country, through
their positions as arrangers of a
private economic 'government',
can exert world-wide control of a
vital product."
As an example, we suggested
agreements with foreign oil com-
panies may well involve America
in unpleasantness in the Near
East, noting the control of these
agreements is not in the hands of
any governmental body.
Hamilton said that corporations
have used two major means of
evading the national boundaries,
which consisted usually of prohibi-

tively high tariffs and political
f rontiers.
Before World War I the most
common method was setting up a
corporation in a foreign nation,
by getting the charter from one
place and operating the plant in
another.
Through a complicated organi-
zation in which ownership, char-
ter and production are spread over
a large area, the corporation
"jumps boundaries" and is free
from political allegiance.
Between the wars, another
method of evasion became preva-
lent. Raw material with low tar-
iff rates would be brought across
borders a.nd refined in the country
of production, which was low in
those materials.- Variations of this
two-part production are in evi-
dence in a number of goods, Ham-
ilton said.
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