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February 26, 1955 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-26

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26,1$55

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE P"IVg

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1955 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE FIVE

-Daily--Sam Ching
SOME OF THE 7,000 ORGAN PIPES

Renovation Program on Hill
6rgan Nearing Completion

By DAVID KAPLAN
After nine months of repair
work, the $40,000 renovation pro-
gram on Hill Auditorium's organ
is nearing completion.
Almost all of the organ's 7,000
pipes were taken out, cleaned and
revoiced. The exceptions were the
32-feet high wooden base pipes.
Sme pipes were cleaned here.
Others were sent to the Aeolian
Skinner Company in Boston to
be revoiced.
Retain Character
.The remaining work will be done
as soon as the new console arrives
some time in April. "We tried to
retain the character of the old or-
gan," Prof. Robert Noehren, Jni-
versity organist commented, "by
combining the best of the old with
the best of the new."
Prof. Noehren will give the first
of three organ recitals March 6,
with a dedication program sched-
ule for next fall. The two other
recitals will be March 13 and 20.
Included on the dedication pro-
g-am will be a series of recitals
by University music faculty mem-
bgrs and the publication of a book-
let describing the organ, its history
and program notes.
Lenz Appointed.
To Local Post
Ralph W. Lenz, former sani-
tarian with the city of Denver,
Colo., has been appointed to a
similar post in Ann Arbor, health
officer Dr. Otto K. Engelke an-
nounced yesterday.
Lenz will work with sanitarian
Emmet Zerr in inspecting milk
and city restaurants. He replaces
Owen Birchman, who resigned last
year.
Watch the
Iowa-Michigan
Basketball Game
on TV,
Channel 20
at 3 P.M., AA time
PRETZEL BELL
120 East Liberty

"Intensive, daily use of the in-
strument has necessitated the
present rebuilding," Dean Earl V.
Moore of the music school com-
mented
Used All Year
"After this repair job," Prof.
Noehren commented; "the organ
can last another 25 years, if it is
used with the same amount of
wear and tear. Students are using
it for either teaching or practic-
ing, from 7 a.m to midnight every
day, all year round, except for
vacations."
"In reality," he continued, "the
instrument has had about 100
years use since its last repair job
in 1926. Most organs are used
for Sundays services and church
gatherings for only a few hours a
week."
The organ covers four levels in
an area 50 feet high, 75 feet long
and 20 feet wide. More than 7,000
pipes and 600 miles of wire are
used in it.
"We have combined the best in
French, German and American
organs so, that music form all na-
tional schools can be played ade-
quately," Prof. Noehren comment-
ed.
"German and French reeds are
used," he continued, "and we have
the famous "Vox Uhmana" reg-
ister. The register sounds almost
like the human voice, and was
built by the famous French or-
gan builder, Cavaille-Coll."
History Traced
,A Detroit firm built the original
organ for Chicago's Columbian
Exposition in 1893.
At the Exposition's conclusion,
the organ was purchased by the
University Musical Society and in-
stalled in University Hall the fol-
lowing year.
While in University Hall, it was
used for chapel exercises, concerts
and by the Choral Union during
the May Festivals.
With the completion of Hill
Auditorium in 1913, the instru-
ment was moved to its present
site and enlarged during its re-
building.
In 1926, the organ was again
completely rebuilt, removing the
pipes that had been worn by age.
Because of pipe modernization,
only a few pipes remain from the
1893 original.

India
"Traditions of the people of
India" will be viewed on "Mich-
igan Report" at 515 p.m. to-
morrow over WWJ-TV.
Highlighting the feature will
be the performance of tradi-
tional dances by students from
India now enrolled at the Uni-
versity.
James Davis, director of the
International Center, will talk
with the Indian students, pre-
senting a brief explanation of'
the origin of the dances and
something of the life and cul-
ture of the people of India.
Alumni Set
'Salesman'
Conference
More than 40 volunteer sales-
men will gather here today from
points as distant asrRhode Island
and Georgia.
They will arrive to discuss their
mutual product-the University.
Local Chairmen of the Michi-
gan Alumni Fund, many from dis-
tant communities, will launch the
meeting at 10 a.m. today in Rm.
3B of the Union with a workshop
on "Personal Solicitation Proced-
ures."
"All previous Fund appeals,'
according to Alumni Fund Man-
ager James K. Miller, "have been
by mail. Results of this workshop,"
he said, "should launch an im-
portant personal campaign to
strengthen the new annual giving
program.
At noon the Local Chairmen
will join the Alumni Fund Board
for luncheon in the Union. Uni-
versity Vice-President Wilbur K.
Pierpont will preside, introducing
as speakers Development Council
Board Chairman Earl H. Cress
and Student-Affairs Vice-Presi-
dent James A. Lewis. Lewis will
deliver the main address, on "The
Student Scene."
Local chairmen have been in-
vited to join the Board for its 2
p.m. business meeting in the Re-
gents' Rm., Administration Bldg.
Speakers at the meeting will be
Assistant Dean of Faculties Rob-
ert L. Williams, discussing "Con-
tinuing Needs at Michigan," As-
sistant to the President Erich A.
Walter, addressing on "Michigan
Alumni Fund Scholarship Pro-
gram."
Other speakers include Dean
Earl V. Moore and Prof. Louise E.
Cuyler of the School of Music, who
will discuss "The Steelfeld Col-
lection of Musicology."
Data Collection
Topic of TalK
By Sociologist
Nathan Keyfitz of the Domin-
ion Bureau of Statistics, Canada,
will speak to the sociology col-
loquium at 4 p.m. Tuesday in the
East Conference Room of Rack-
ham on "Problems of Data Col-
lection in Under-Developed Areas."
Future speakers for the col-
loquium, which is held eyery two
weeks, are: Reuben Hill, who will
speak on the "Puerto Rican Fam-
ily and Fertility Project-Strategy
of Research in Population Con-
trol" on March 9 and Alex Inkeles,
who will talk on the "Soviet Un-
ion Seen Through the Eyes of Its
Former Citizens" on March 23.

Stamp Club
To Sponsor
Exhibition
The Ann Arbor Stamp Club is
sponsoring the 22nd annual stamp
exhibition and bourse from 12
noon to 11 p.m. today on the third
floor of the Union.
The feature exhibit, owned by
Robert Schoen of Saginaw, shows
the cancellation stamp used in
1883 by Harry Nichols, Ann Arbor
mail clerk. Each mail clerk had
his own cancellation stamp so
that the complete route of a let-
ter could be retraced. This was a
precaution against robbery of the
mail which was a problem in those
early days.
Also included in the exhibition
is the collection of the late Dr.
A. B. Lewis. The collection covers
many towns in Southeastern
Michigan and dates back to the
time when Michigan was still a
territory.

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(Continued from Page 1)
election of candidates for state
and other national offices could
not get SAC approval.
Committee Permission
The lecture committee fits into
the picture because groups wish-
ing to hear political candidates
speak in a University building
must secure the committee's per-
mission.
The lecture committee generally
reserves the right to prohibit any
speaker who is known to advo-
cate or who is a member of a
political party which advocates
the overthrow of the government.
For this reason SAC recom-
mended that the new student gov-
ernment attempt to work out the
problem with the lecture com-
mittee.
It was SAC's hope that some
joint policy can be reached as a
basis for recognizing student po-
litical groups who desire to bring
candidates to speak on campus.

-Daily-John Hirtzel
PROF. CHARLES E. KOELLA
... contact and French culture
Student Faculty Contact
Stressed by Prof. Koella
By SHIRLEY CROOG
"We're producing M o 1 i e r e 's
"I feel most happy here if I have 'L'Avare,' the 'Miser', this semes-
contact with students," Prof. ter. Moliere is my favorite French
Charles E. Koella, chairman of the playwright," Prof. Koella contin-
committee on oral French courses, ued.
said. "He is so thorough and so true
"I believe a faculty man should that he give you the portrait of
be interested in his students di-life that no oier writer has been
rectly. This direct contact, in my able to do so completely. He is
mase, I feel, interests students in still growing in stature in French
French culture," the white-haired literature amongnthe French pea-
professor continued. ple."
Prof. Koella, born and educated In producing one of Moliere's
in Lausanne, Switzerland, is a plays. Prof. Koella said "I want
familiar figure on campus, with my actors to have perfect pro-
his beret and horn rimmed glasses. nounciation first, then intonation.
Teaches Russian Students But most of all I want them to give
Most of Prof. Koella's life has fire and life to the parts that
been concerned with teaching. In make Moliere live again."
1912, he was preparing young During his liftime, Prof. Koel-
people in Russia tQ enter Swiss la's avocational interests have
universities. ranged from music and drama
Prof. Koella was both tutor and tennis tournaments and figure
guardian for three years to a skating to mountain climbing.
prince at Bucharest, Rumania. "Mountain climbing, which my
In 1926, he came to the Uni- father taught me at the age of six,
versity where he has taught con- gives one confidence, self-control,
versation, advanced composition, and courage. It's dangerous, but
and French modern literature healthy."
courses. Receives Decoration
While at the University, Prof. For his work in promoting
Koella founded the summer-ses- French culture in the United
sion French Club in 1935, La Pe- States, the French Government
tite Causette in 1947 and has been decorated Prof. Koella with the
associated with the production of high honor of the Palmes Academ-
French plays since 1926. iques in 1952.
Creates Social Contact "I'm not the only one in the
To create social contact between family to be paid such honor," he
faculty and students, Prof. Koella added modestly. "My wife receiv-
started the French House, "Le Foy- ed the Royal Medal of Freedom,
er Francais" on campus during personally, from the King of Nor-
the summer session in 1936. Ac- way for her outstanding work for
tivity has ceased, however, since the Norwegian people during the
the war. A permanent French war."
House has always been his aim Speaking about his travels
and he hopes that it will one day through South America, North
be built. Africa, the Near East, and most
From 1919 to 1922 Prof. Koella of Europe, Prof. Koella comment-
was secretary to the Consulate of ed, "I have known Europe when it
Switzerland in New York City. was a marvelous place, when
He has written articles on mod- there was a perfect free exchange
ern French literature. Some of his of ideas between different nations.
articles concern such people as Hopes for Unity
Charles F. Ranunz; Georges Cour- "I hope that Europe will one
teline, a French humorist; Gyp, a day become a unified continent
French woman fighting for more with its complete free exchange
rights for young women; Julien of ideas, trade, and social con-
Green, Panait Istrati, and Marcel tact-just as it was before World
Pagnol. War I."
Besides being faculty advisor to He keeps in contact with friends
Le Cercle Francais and La P'tite in Switzerland, France, Norway,
Causette Prof. Koella has direct- and Denmark, and still likes to
ed alone since 1941 the French travel. "It keeps me young," he
plays presented at the University. said.

..._

Following a discussion of the
sorority rushing question "SAC
recommended that Student Gov-
ernment Council consider the gen-
eral campus rushing problem
sometime in the future."
Assembly and Panhellenic rep-
resentatives indicated that their
groups would probably be able to
work out some solution and bring
it to SGC as problem areas pre-
sent themselves.
Other SAC members said that
neither Assembly nor Panhel can
be regarded as isolated units on
campus and insofar as their acti-
vities affect the student body as
a whole, SGC should have the
right to discuss and regulate these
activities.
SAC also asked to hear reports
from the Interfraternity Council,
Panhel and The Daily on progress
being made in fraternity and sor-
ority bias clause removal at their
March 8 meeting.

SAC Discusses Bias Clause,
Rushing, Political Groups

11

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave.
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45 A.M.-Worship Service. Sermon by Rev.
Press: "Overcoming Temptation"
7:00 P.M.-Student Guild
Wednesday 7:30 P.M.-Midweek Lenten Service.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. George Barger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship, Sermon: "Sharing the
Church"
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Dr. and Mrs. Genne of the Mott
Foundation at Flint, will speak and lead a
discussion on DATING, FRIENDSHIP AND
COURTSHIP.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group and Church
School Panel on Seditious Legislation: Smith
Act, McCarran Act, and Communist Con-
trol Ace-Dr. Robert Hunter, Mr. .Morton
Polster, and Mr. Alan Raywid.
11:00 A.M.--Services-Rev. Edward H. Redman
preaching on: "What Lent May Mean for Us."
5:00 P.M.-High School Young People-"In-
traducing Liberal Religion"
7:30 P.M.-"'Philosophies of Liberal Religions."
-Unitarian Student Group Discussion
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
William and State Sts.
Minister--Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Minister to Students: Rev. H. L. Pickerill,
Assoc. Sue Gillespie.
At 10:45 A.M. Dr. Parr will give the first of a
series of Lenten sermons on "Words Men
Live By," his topic being "Your Words Have
Kept Men on Their Feet." At theStudent
Guild at 7:00 Dr. and Mrs. Genne, marriage
counsellors for the Mott Foundation will dis-
cuss "Dating, Friendship ,and Courtship."
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-"God's Witness to His Son"
6:00-Student Guild
7:30-"The Poor Wise Man"
Wednesday 7:30-Prayer Meeting.
We extend a cordial invitation to each of you.
Come and fellowship with us in the Word
of God.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
and STUDENT CENTER
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Henry Kuizenga and George Laurent, Ministers
WilliamS. Baker and Edward Sue, University
Pastors
Sunday morning discussion following early ser-
vice, 10:45.
St. John Passion-Schuetz 4:00
Choir director-Maynard Klein, James Wal-
lace, organist.
Evening WSF fellowship, 6:45-"Africa"

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.-SundayuMorning Service
Feb. 27-Christ Jesus
8:00 P.M.-Wednesday Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed or purchased.
Reading Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday-Saturday 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.; and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study
6:00 P.M.-Supper Meeting-"Church Symbol-
ism," Dr. Yoder, Speaker.
Tuesday-
7:15 P.M.-Study Group-"Great Church Lead-
ers
Wednesday-
7:30 P.M.-Lenten Service-Coffee Hour Fol-
lowing
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Worship Services.
Sermon,, "The Mount of Holines," first in
series on "Key Mountains of Scripture." (Holy
Communion in 10:45 service)
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
Club, Supper and Program. Candlelight initia-
tion of new members. Business meeting.
Wednesday at 7:30 and at 9:15: Lenten Vesper
Services, with sermon by the pastor, "Judas
Iscariot-Bankrupt Betrayer."
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Res. Ph. NO 5-4205; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M.-Morning Service
7:00 P.M.-Evening Service
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Sts.
Sunday Masses-
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12:00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday evenings-7:30
P.M.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks Minister
Beth Mahone, Student Advisor
Sunday, Feb. 27-
9:45-Student class studies first Peter
11:00-Sermon, "The Richness of His Grace"
6:45-Roger Williams Guild, The Jewish Con-
tribution to Contemporary Christianity, Rabbi
Julius Weinberg, speaker.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Lane Hall
10:00 A.M.-Young Friends
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship. Visitors Wel-
come.

Y C LLE E T CO LEG , C AST TO OAS --R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co..Winston-Waem, N. 0.
COLEGE TO COLLEGE, COAST TO COAST-
is re

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "From Dilem-
ma to Insight." Dr. Abbey, preaching.
9:30 A.M.-Student Seminar, Topic: "Para-
doxes of the Christian Faith.
5:30 P.M.-Supper and Fellowship
6:45 P.M.-Worship and Program. Panel Dis-
cussion: "Can We Be Moral Without Christ."
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms, Open

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M. - 11.00 A.M. - 7:30 P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M. Bible Study, G. Wheeler

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