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February 26, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-02-26

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PAGE TWO

T8E MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, rEBRUARY 26.1955

PAGE TWO TUE MICHIGAN DAILY ~ATTTRDAY. PVRRTTAfl~Y ~fl

V li i. ViVilii .R.! A' R "L4V ZXLY.L 4WV, 1.7 0 aF

..

PERIOD OF 40 DAYS:
History of Lent Traced
With Various Services

Lent, on the surface, is marked
chiefly by promises to forego fa-
vored foods and drinks for a 40--
day period and by ashes on the
foreheads of some church mem-
bers.
But the six-week period, for cen-
turies a time of self-denial and
penitence, has a history tracing
back to Christianity's first annals,
with countless variations in differ-
ent church{ procedures.
Self-Denial Advocates
Since Christ spent 40 days fast-
=ing prior to his crucifixion and
resurrection, Christian churches
have advocated the use of the
samne 40 days, preceding Easter
Sunday, for self-denial and fast-
ing.
Strictest emphasis on Lenten
practices c o m e s in Catholic
churches, where failure to observe
the fasting period constitutes a
sin. For Roman Catholics between
21 and 59 years of age, meat may
be eaten only once daily during the
period, and other meals reduced
to a minimum.
Episcopalian and L u t h e r a n
churches, also following the
church year, follow Lenten pro-

cedures less rigidly. "Fasting," ac-
cording to Rev. Henry O. Yoder of
the Lutheran Student Center, "is
completely voluntary for each in-
dividual. We encourage it as a
preparation for the true meaning
of Easter, and our special services
are planned to stress this mean-
ing."
Special Services
Other Protestant churches con-
duct special Lenten services on
basis of their own schedules, and;
do not require that their members
fast.
The Lenten period began this
week with Ash Wednesday-com-
memorating an ancient Christian
practice whereby church members
crossed their foreheads with ashes
burned the previous Palm Sunday.
Sprinkled with holy water, the
ashes were considered a remedy to
all penitence.
Sundays are not included in
Lenten fasting procedures, but for
members of liturgical churches the
practices m u s t be followed
throughout other days of the week.
Lent ends Easter Sunday, Apr.
10, with traditional feasts honoring
Christ's resurrection.

PROSPECTING FOR DIAMONDS IN EAST AFRICA

Prospector Finds Yield
Of Diamonds in Volcano

v- i

TONIGHT 8:15
FRY'S "A PHOENIX TOO FREQUENT"
and
"TIuE BOOR" by Anton Chekhov
STUDENT RATE 99c General Admission $1.65'
also Saturday and Sunday 8:15 P.M.
Please make reservations early
DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
NO 2-5915 327 South Fourth

By ETHEL KOVITZ
"He found diamonds in the mud
brushed from his shoes."
"Boysddigging his truck out of
the mud found diamonds in the
tireless rims."
These are but two of the fables
told about John Thoburn William-
son, a man who, stories say, was
once too poor to buy tires for his
truck, now owns the biggest and
possibly the richest diamond mine
in the world.
Years Spent Searching
Actually, Williamson did not
find diamonds by luck. He spent
several years methodically search-
ing eastern Africa before he was
successful in finding a volcano pipe
which yielded diamonds in a re-
mote section of Tanganyika, East
Africa.
Rodney W. Deane, '59, 'worked
for Williamson five years, describ-
ed his prospecting methods.
Specific Minerals
Prospecting begins, according to
Deane, by looking for two specific
minerals appearing simultaneously.
If they are found together and
their source is kimberlite (the ma-

terial from which diamonds come)
a process of washing the soil in
search of diamonds begins.
Soil mixed with water is fed to
a large pan with rotating arms.
After the clay is washed out the
mixture is gravitated through a
screen. The heavier materials, in-
cluding diamonds, if they are pres-
ent, will settle in the center.
The next process, Deane said,
is placing the stones in hydro-
fluoric acid for 24 hours. The acid
destroys everything but diamonds.
Diamonds Registered
In an effort to combat stealing
by the employees, African law re-
quires that all diamonds be regis-
tered 24 hours after they are
found.
Upon removal from the acid, the
diamonds in Williamson's mine are
placed in a huge concrete box.
To get into the box three people
must be present, each of whom
has one of three keys needed to
open it.
Sold in Lots
From the mine the diamonds
are sent to London where they are
sold in lots after having been
graded. They are then sold to in-
dustrialists or diamond cutters, de-
pending on their quality.
Everything at the mine is run
electrically, according to Deane.
"The power supply there is more
than enough to run Ann Arbor.
That much power is needed to run
the electric motor'," he said.
Although power facilities are
available to the employees, many
of the natives don't like to use
electricity. "Some have never seen
electric lights before," Deane com-
mented.
IWUERTH
The No-Gun Sheriff
Who Stops 'em All!!

W. C. FIELDS
and MAE WEST
in
My. Little Chickadee
Saturday at 7 and 9
Sunday at 8 only
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50c

J

ANNUAL:
Assembly
Group Sets
Conference
Assembly Association's Work-
shop Conference, an annual affair
with 16 discussion groups and a
noon luncheon, will take place to-
day in the League.
Beginning at 10 a.m. four dis-
cussion sessions will meet simul-
taneously until 11 a.m. They will
take up the problems of Assembly's
relation to the individual member,
service problems in the residence
halls, women's hours and the resi-
dence hall's role in the campus
community.
The second set of discussion
groups, meeting from 11 a.m. to
noon, will discuss Assembly Coun-
cil and individual houses, residence
hall staff, and the integration of
freshmen, sorority pledges and
transfer students into the houses.
After a noon luncheon at Stock-
well, the conference will resume at
1:30 p.m. House activities, house
government, and problems caused
by the rapidly increasing Univer-
sity enrollment, will be taken up.
The last group of workshops will
deal with problems of dorm offi-
cers, Judiciaries and League hous-
es. There will also be a discussion
of possible types of new dormitor-
ies.
From 3:30 to 4 p.m. there will
be a summary session.
Auto Institute
Slates Meeting
An Institute for Teachers of
Auto Mechanics will be held here
today sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Vocational Education and
Practical Arts of the School of Ed-
ucation, in cooperation with the
Department of Mechanical and In-
dustrial Engineering, College of
Engineering and the 'U' Exten-
sion Service.
Morning sessions will be held in
the University Eigh School. Frank
P. Plovick will speak on "The 12
Volt Battery System" at 9:30 a.m.
in Rm. 1022.
Following this talk, the automo-
bile engineering staff of the De-
partment of Mechanical and In-
dustrialAEngineering will explain
"Some Aspects of the Engine Cy-
cle as Illustrated by Indicator
Cards."
Demonstrations In the Automo-
tive Laboratory in West Engineer-
ing Annex conducted by the Au-
tomotive Engineering Staff of the
Department of Mechanical and In-
dustrial Engineering will high-
light the afternoon's activities.
Health Problems
To Be Discussed
Second Citizens public health
conference will be held March 3,
4 and 5 in the School of Public
Health Auditorium.
Tuberculosis, chronic illness and
suburban health problems will- be
the main topics of discussion.
The conference is sponsored by
the School of Public Health. The
purpose of the meeting is to give
non-technical information on pub-
lic health needs to community
leaders.
I Watch the

Iowa-Michigan
Basketball Game
on TV,
Channel 20
at 3 P.M., AA time
PRETZEL BELL
120 East Liberty

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Box,
39c; shorts, 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1949 JEEP Station Wagon. Six cylinder
with overdrive. Radio and heater.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )239B
1948 DODGE two-door green, radio,
heater, new tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )245B
FOR THE FINEST hi-fidelity music,
hear the new Telefunken; Opus AM,
FM radio. Truly the Cadillac of
radios. Ann Arbor Radio and TV,
1217 S. University, Ph. NO 8-7942, 1%
blocks east of East Eng. 243B
1950 CHEVROLET two-door olue. Radio
and heater. New tires, new battery.
Completely reconditioned. $495 this
week. The big lot across from down-
town carport. Huron Motor Sales,
222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588. )248B
FULLY EQUIPPED, light weight bicy-
cle, $39.95. Service on all makes of
bicycles. Kiddie Korner, Corner of
Main and Madison. )264B
1947 BUICK SEDAN, radio and heater,
$95, 1948 NASH, $95. Fitzgerald-Jor-
dan, Inc., 607 Detroit St. NO 8-8141.
)267B
MICHIGAN GEOLOGICAL SURVEY:
(1859-1917). Nearly complete set;
about 50 volumes. Harry Wight,
Grand Ledge, Mich. )265B
Purchase from Purchase
Cine Kodak, Model 20, 8mm. Movie
Camera, Used. $25.
PURCHASE CAMERA SHOP
1116 S. University NO 8-6972
)270B
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

IIFEflS

FOR SALE
OWNER going to England. 1954 Mer-
cury Monterey, four-door. Power
steering, Merco-Matic, radio, heater,
only 7,000 miles. Exceptional buy at
$2,095. NO 3-0219. )271B
WEBCOR Tape Recorder. Excellent con-
dition. $125. Phone NO 3-4637. )268B
THIS RALENGH BICYCLE was pur-
chased new last summer. Has many
accessories. A steal at $25. Grant
Scruggs, NO 8-8178 after 7:00 p.m.
)272B
1953 CHEVROLET, 150 series, radio,
heater, low mileage, sharp. The big
lot across from downtown carport.
Huron Motor Sales, 222 W. Wash-
ington, NO 2-4588. )276B
1948 CHEVROLET Club Coupe-radio,
heater, good tires. The big lot across
from downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)277B
1951 CUSTOM FORD-4-door, 8 cylin-
der, fordomatic, R&H. White side
wall tires, other extras. $55. Call NO
3-0125 after 5 p.m. )275B
BABY CARRIAGE (Storkline), like new;
cheap! Call NO 2-1038. )274B
PORTABLE PHONOGRAPH, 3-speed.
Almost like new. Best offer. John Ur-
bania. Phone NO 3-4494. )273B
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. Student rooms.
)23D
ONE DOUBLE ROOM, large closet kit-
chen privileges optional. No drinkers
or smokers. For quiet gentlemen.
Near State and Packard-Phone NO
8-8345. )50D
DOUBLE furnished room for two men.
Two short blocks to campus. Shower;
continuous hot water-Reasonable.
Rent single to reliable party 509 S.
Division St. near Jefferson. )58D
SINGLE and multiple rooms near cam-
pus. $6 and $6.50. Ph. NO 2-7639,
1001 S. Forest. )57D
LARGE, CLEAN APARTMENT to share
with male student. 618 Packard, Apt.
2. )60D
SINGLE ROOM for students, 1216 Pros-
pect, NO 3-8490. )59D
SINGLE ROOM for male student. Near
Engine School ind hospital. Cali NO
2-8131. })54D

ROOM AND BOARD
ROOM AND BOARD at Owen Co-op.
$13.38 one week. Two vacancies. Ap-
ply to Paul Dunn, NO 8-7211. ')15E
LARGE MASTER BEDROOM with fire-
place, telephone, garage. Breakfast
accommodations. In quiet and beau-
tiful Barton Hills. References. NO
3-5841. )1?E
HELP WANTED
PART-TIME student help. Apply at
Coffee Shop, 812 Monroe, Between
8 A.M. and 1 P.M. )36Hi
WANTED someone to do part-time
reading and research for blind grad_
uate student. A shred of legal know-
ledge would be useful. Call NO 2-2217.
)38H
SHOE SALESMEN-experience necessary
for part time and Saturdays. Apply
at Masts Shoe Store, 121 South Main
St. )37H
PERSONAL
STUDENTS-begin or continue your
piano playing while at college. Artist
teachers--practice facilities. Robert
Dumm Piano Studios, call NO 2-3541.
)54F
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
Instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)10I
TYPING-Thesis, term papers, etc.
Reasonable rates, prompt service, 830
South Main, NO 8-7590. )251
ALTERATIONS
RE-WEAVING
Burns, tears, moth holes, rewoven. Let
us save your clothes. Weave-Bac
Shop. 224 Nickels Arcade.
)5N
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALTY
NO 2-7787
for 2-3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )90

J,

r _"' "" . T " "

"MICHIGAN'S BIGGEST
VARIETY SHOW"
TONIGHT Student Acts
* Glee Club
A-0 Modern Dance
" Nemnerovski and
HILL Leopold-- MC's
AUDITORIUM * Variety
75c and $1.00 0 Music
S* Laf f s
Tickets Today at Hill Auditorium
'til Showtime
Your Applause Picks the Winner

k /

TODAY

Dial NO 2-2513
For Program
Information

The Wonderful Story of
THREE SAILORS ON LEAVE...

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V:CIORIA DE HAVEN
CQORNNE CALVET
SPAUIiBERT
MIS MARA CORDAY
UNVREOJ94 MISUSA ?15

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WARINERCOLOR
WAN ROS. 8
WARNER BROS. IO
Also
AOne of the funniest farce
comedies in years1" ,
-Crowltr, N. Y.Timor
v v
TECHNICOLORt
Organization Presentation.
A universal-International Release

II

TODAY

I 1 i
t

LATE SHOW
TONIGHT 11 P.M.

i

READ
DAILY
CLASSIFIEDS

SUFFERING FROM ENNUI? TRY THIS FOR KICKS!
IT SHAKES YOUR SIDES LIKE SEVEN BRIDES!

I

I

Today
and Sunday

ORPHEUM

1:30 P.M.
65c

to j rx t4. Y. DAILY NEWS

IN
SHE'S THE MOST
IMPATIENT MAIDEN
IN THE VIRGIN WEST...
BUT HE'S NOT THE
MARRYING KIND!

NATURE'S COLOR AND THE PANORAMA

OF

',$+.5.4+"SCLCLd' 7. "7+M^H^A '964:..,",dQL7.k'+i:,Y+!K'Fi5'dJ57J+WrfA.'l%+r:7 0.::4iY.b:: fi :+r'.h."TlfA:4X++PW'F' ++ + usBrA J%,6Rr5.CY/.[b}:
'>Yls4n:"ivY.qAplr.6lY lrid:45tifrb:+Y'h: +:.ffH/XlkYI F! .

I

The all-star comedy hit! George Cole as a bank clerk Casanova
is bound to tickle the family and crowd!
ASSOCIATED BRITISH present
: GEORGE COLE
veronica HURST- Jon PERTWEE
ath a $-ATER
IeatherTHATlCHER JaMeAYE
William IARTNELL - Diana DECKER
Joan SIMS and Alan BADEL
Colour by
TECHNICOLOR

se,
CONCERT
RECORDS
TV andRAI
OPERA f"l:<
fsSCNllDCTuap

Robertaor

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Eleanor Parker

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WITH
Victor Mclaglen - Russ Tamblyn
Jeff Richards - James Arness

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