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September 26, 1954 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-26

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SUNDAY,: SEPTEMBER. 26, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FI

.,.U

N SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1954 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FORMER MET OPERA STAR:
Greer Joins 'U' Music Faculty

By DAVID KAPLAN
"I have left the field of full-
scale opera and am now going to
give the experience of my career
to the University of Michigan."
This thought was expressed by
Frances Greer, who has sung with
the Metropolitan and Philadelphia
Opera Companies, and who has
now become a permanent member
of the School of Music faculty.
Miss Greer's musical career
spans over a quarter of a century,
starting in Helena, Ark., when at
f the age of four she sang "I Love
You Truly" on top of a soap box in
a Tom Thumb wedding.
Her parents were poor, but rich
in musical background. Her father
was the choir director of the local
Presbyterian Church. She and her
six brothers and sisters sang in
the choir and her mother was
church organist.
Class Salutatorian
In high school, Miss Greer was
salutatorian and won a scholar-
ship to Louisiana State University.
After arriving at the University in
Baton 'Rouge, she auditioned for
the Dean of the music school and
won another scholarship which en-t
abled her to study voice with Pas-
quale Amato of the Metropolitan
Opera.
At the time, she was 16 years
old and had never seen an opera.
She sang in the first opera she
saw, when she sang the role of
Micaela in "Carmen" at the Uni-
versity. The leading soprano roles
in "Butterfly," "Faust," and "La
Traviata" followed...
Upon graduation from Louisiana
State, Miss Greer toured Europe
with the University Orchestra, sing-
ing in the major capitals.
She returned to the United States
early in 1939 and became a char-
ter member of the Philadelphia
Gothic Films
The first film in the Gothic Film
Society series, Jean Cocteau's "Or-
pheus," will be presented on Oct.
18 at the Rackham amphitheater.
Cocteau's "Orpheus" will be the
first of 11 films, all dealing with the
subject of fantasy. The picture, ac-
cording to series director William
Wiegand, is "about a poet's trip
to the Underworld. It is a study in
the difference between 'this world
and the other world.' "
The remaining films in the se-
ries have not been selected as yet.
The cost of the entire course, which
will run through next semester,
is $5.
} vyIEEiEMS ."msm

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TV Courses
Expand Hour
ir Education
September 16 will remain a day
for the 'U' television studios to re-
member.
WWTV, Cadillac, Mich., notified
the studio that it would begin car-
rying the University of Michigan
Television Hour.
Television at the University has
been growing at a rapid pace since
NIovember 1950 when a oine-hour
telecast appeared each Sunday
over WWJ-TV, Detroit. In addition
to WWTV and WWJ-TV, University
television may now be viewed over
stations WOOD-TV Grand Rapids,
WJIM-TV Lansing, WKZO-TV Kal-
amazoo, and WPAG-TV Ann Arbor.
University TV initiated "Tele-
courses" in an effort to prove that
television could be utilized for pub-
lic enlightenment as well as pub-
lic entertainment. Public response
to these programs was so enthusi-
astic that the educational TV ven-
ture has been labeled a success.
Therefore the Telecourses will be
offered again on the "TV Hour"
each Sunday this fall as the Uni-
versity innaugurates the fifth suc-
cessive year of bringing education
to adult viewers via television.
According to Garnet R. Garri-
son, University director and origi-
nator of the nationally known pro-
gram, the first half of the Sunday
Hour will feature "The Teen Ager:
A Study of Adolescent Behavior"
and will discuss such pertinent
questions as "Just what are teen-
agers like today?" "How serious
s delinquency?" "How serious is
going steady?' "
The second half of the program
will present Prof. James H. Zum-
berge of the geology department
n a seven-weeks series titled "Our
Changing Earth: "The Geology of
Michigan."
Assisted by Prof. Edwin N. God-
dard and Prof. Kenneth K. Lan-
des, the program will deal with
problems arising from the growing
necessity of finding new mineral
deposits, large petroleum reserves
and an increased water supply for
xpanding industries and irrigation.

SL Films
SL Cinema Guild will present
"the Black Rose" at 8 p.m. to-
day in Architecture Auditorium.
Admission to the technicolor
film starring Tyrone Power,
Orson Wells and Cecil Aubry is
50 cents.
Shaw Play
To open Bill
Ann Arbor's new arena theater,
under the sponsorship of the Dra-
matic Arts Center, will begin its
first season on Oct. 21, with Ber-
nard Shaw's "Arms and the Man,"
it was announced yesterday.
Shaw's story of the chocolate-
cream soldier will be followed on
Nov. 18 by "The London Mer-
chant," an eighteenth century trag-
edy by George Lillo.
"The Moon and the Yellow Riv-
er" by Denis Johnston will open
on Dec. 31, followed on" Jan. 27 by
Albert Camus' "Caligula." The
French dramatist's play, which
deals with abuse of power by the
Roman Emperor Caligula, is one
of a group of post World War II
plays to come out of France.
Shaw will again take over the
Center's stage on Feb. 24 with
"Doctor's Dilemna."
Set to open on March 4, the sea-
son's sixth play will be a contem-
porary American work which has
not yet been chosen. The Center's
first season will close with. a pre-
sentation of J. B. Priestley's new
quartet "Dragon's Mouth" from
April 24 to May 15.
Each of the seven plays will run
Thursday through Saturday nights
for a period of four weeks. All of
them will be presented in the Cen-
ter's arena theater, now under con-
struction in the Masonic Temple
at 327 S. Fourth.
Memberships,priced at $10 and
entitling the holder to see one per-
formance of each play, are cur-
rently on sale at the Masonic Tem-
ple and at local bookstores.

(..

Laurence H. Scott, '55, famed il-
lustrator and student, has an-
nounced that under the sponsor-
shiip of Gargoyle, cultural com-
modities will be on display begin-
ning Saturday in the West Gallery
of Rackham Bldg. '
Scott informed The Daily that
this unique collectior. is the only
one of its kind. The commodities,
ranging from dancing boots to Bar-
tok records, have been sent by the
governments of Poland, Czechoslo-
vakia, Rumania, Hungary, Bulgar-
ia and China in the interests of
'cultural exchange."
Obscure Tongue
The first to penetrate the cultur-
al iron-curtain with such a collec-
tion, Scott was aided in his efforts
by certain linguistic skills. These
include a knowledge of French,
Italian, Russian, Polish and a cer-
tain obscure tongue known as Gar-
goylian.
The multitudinous array began

innocently enough with magazines,
newspapers and similar publica-
tions from these countries. Re-
quests, however, yielded unhoped-
for treasures and the present col-
lection is the result.
Refusing to comment on the ex-
act number of articles, Scott as-
sured prospective viewers that
there are "piles of interesting
items." One of his favorite items
G&S Roles Open
The Gilbert and Sullivan So-
ciety will hold tryouts for chorus
and principal roles in "The Pirates
of Penzance" at 7 p.m. today in
the League.
The last Gilbert and Sullivan
production of "The Pirates and
production of "The Pirates of Pen-
bance" was in 1950, a production.
which also went on tour. Last
year's operetta was "Patience." .

is a pair of Roumanian leath
dancing boots.
Embroidered folk costumes, a
books from China bound in sil
rare and unusual scrolls paint
in brilliant colours (colors) an
painstakingly - carved woodwork
are only a few of the cultur
treats on hand.
The exhibition has- been value
at several hundred of dollars b
various collectors.
Only Chance
Meanwhile, Scott is continuin
his foreign correspondence in th
hopes of bigger and better cultur
al commodities. He modestly a
serts that anyone could have don
the same.
The exhibition can be seen fror
7 to 10 p.m. daily through Octob
10. Scott warns that this may b
the last, first and only chance fo
students to view a collection o
this nature.

Cultural Commodities on Exhibit

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Books

--Daily-Marj Grozier
FRANCES GREER LOOKS AT THE AUTOGRAPHED PICTURE
OF HER GOOD FRIEND ARTURO TOSCANINI

Opera Company, her first profes- composer and Toscanini conducted n
sional operatic work. The Opera's a work of his in La Scala in 1896. H
repertoire was entirely in English, After leaving the Met in 1951,
the first opera group in the coun- Miss Greer did a great deal ofA
try to attempt such a feat. work with Dimitri Mitropoulos and a
Author in Audience the New York Philharmonic. Sheq
One of ier roles in Philadelphia appeared in concert performancesa
was as Pelleas in Debussy's "Pel- of Ravel's "L'heure Espagnol,,,"i
leas et Melisande." Maurice Mae- Milhaud's "Les Cheophores," five
terlinck, whose book furnished the performances o f Mendelssohn's
libretto for the opera, was in the "Elijah" and five performances ofw
audience the night she sang. Monteverdi's first opera, "Orfeo."b
Maeterlinck had never seen the Numerous other musical activi- C
opera performed, because when it ties also include a radio program N
was being cast for the first time which she had for two and a half
thirty years before, he had had an years, recordings of both operettasd
argument with Debussy and walked and classical works and 15 sum- d
out on rehearsals. mers spent on the operetta circuit
Miss Greer's Pelleas was the throughout the country.
first and last he ever saw, for he Taught Privately
died shortly thereafter.TagtPitey d
Early in 1942, Miss Greer ap- For the last three years, Miss a
peared on the Radio Auditions of Greer taught privately in Newe
the Air and won $1,000 and a Met- York, but felt that she wanted to
ropolitan Opera contract. She made be connected with a school or Uni-
her debut as Musetta in "La Bo- versity. "Ann Arbor has such a
heme" on Nov. 30, 1942,and stayed far-reaching and wide reputation,"
at the Met until 1951. she said, "that when I heard that
Her husband, Victor Trucco, is there was an opening in the School
the assistant conductor at the Met of Music at the University, I flew
and prepared the arrangements for out here and in four days I had
Arturo Toscanini when he record- signed a contract."
ed complete operas with the Met Even though she is teaching, she
cast. Toscanini was a close friend would like to give concerts. "Who
of her husband's family in Italy. could cease singing after having c
Miss Greer's father-in-law was a such a musical background as I p
have had? I couldn't cut off that U
. . : r ' ' ' v , }?": . . : :: w a y , a lth o u g h I d o lo v e to te a c h ." Q
Miss Greer's first concert will d
be on Oct. 18 in the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre. "I am anxious to s
sing for the Ann Arbor people,"
she said, "and I am so happy to
grbe here." m

Arriving Daily
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KEEPING AN EYE ON
Your Student Legislature

By MURRY FRYMER
Heinz Kohler, this year's ex-
change student from Germany as
part of the SL's plan with the Free
University of Berlin, has arrived in
Quebec and is expected here Tues-
day.
Lois Deiche, Grad., is the Univer-
ity student now studying in Berlin.
. * *
The Culture and Education com-
mittee is investigating academic

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honor systems at other universi-
ties for possible adoption here. The
University of Virginia and Virginia
Military Institute plans are being
studied closely.
* *
Student Purchase cards which
were distributed at registration are
good for student discounts in the
following cities:
Minneapolis, Boston, Philadel
phia, Buffalo, St. Paul, Colorado
Springs, Detroit, Los Angeles,
Houghton, New Haven, Miami, Chi-
cago, and greater New York.
Only certain retailers in these cit-
ies are included in the plan. Dis-
counts are varying from five to 50
per cent.
S" ,
In SL voting last week:
Motion-The SL endorses the Stu-
dent Government Council plan with
the following modifications (in
brief):
1. That the SGC be allowed to
draft a constitution and coordinate
it with the Regents' By-Laws, go-
ing into effect with student approv-
al,
2. After one-year trial period, the
SGC be allowed to increase its
membership.
3. SGC be given financial control
over all student organizations fall-
ing under its sphere of activity.
FOR: Beck, Beebe, Berliner, Ble-
ha, Boggan, Butman, Bryan, Cook,
Cummins, Denison, Germany, Gil-
man, Harris, Hewitt, Hillman, Hoff-
man, Klame, Leacock, Levine, Net-
zer, Rossner, Simon, Sommer, Tau-
ber.
AGAINST' Dormont, Levy;
ABSENT: Abrams, Adams, Back-
lar, Cox, Petricoff, Schneider, Ska-
la, Yates, Zimmerman. ABSTAIN-
ING: Chigrinsky.
VOTE: 24 For; 2 Against, 1 Ab-
stain, 9 Absent.

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