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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 15, 1954 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEYE1~

Graduate Schools Attract Many

Dramatic Arts Center
Preparing for Opening
Ann Arbor is well on the way innovation. Local playwrights
toward having a Dramatic Arts be encouraged to submit t
Center as a focal point for serious work.
dramatic interests of adults and Plays will be performed in
children. Masonic Temple building, a
The center plans activities in slight alterations are made in
set construction, dance, music, art auditorium floor to make a ti
exhibits, and will maintain a small ter-in-ther-ound stage.
staff of professional actors and The membership plan invo
Board of Directors a ten dollar fee which allows

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will
heir
the
after
the
thea-
lves
the

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Started by a group of local cit-
izens who bought up the assets
of the now defunct Arts Theater
Club, the Dramatic Arts Center isE
headed by 15 directors, ten elected
and five appointed, including sev-
eral faculty members.'
The board was selected by mem-
bers of the non-profit corporation
plus those who have made dona-
tions.
Eugene Power, spokesman for
the group, has sa'id they plan to
raise a $4,000 reserve fund before
going beyond the planning stage.
A large percentage of this fund
has already been received.
The group plans to produce seri-
ous plays in both traditional and
modern vein, with emphasis on]

nolder to attend seven plays,bring-
ing guests at an extra charge.
Space will also be provided for
exhibiting the work of local art-
ists, and it is planned that local
musical organizations and talent
will be used in connection with
the dramatic performances.

HIAIRISTYLING

1

TO SHIlT

Sears Welcomes
the students to
ANN ARBOR

YOUR TASTE

715 N. University

With

a

timely

rein der

m

WA

that you can always

THE LAW QUAD AND DENTAL SCHOOL ARE CAMPUS LANDMARKS; MANY COME TO UNDERGRADUATE SCHOOL
AT MICHIGAN, STAY ON FOR ADVANCED WORK WITHIN THESE BUILDINGS

Three Bands Gain World-

In 1844, nine student musicians
assembled to play at campus,
chapel services.
These nine men were the orig-
inal nucleus of the University
Bands, an organization today com-
prising over 300 students.
Under the direction of Prof.
William D. Revelli, the Band con-
sists of three units, Marching
Band, Symphony Band, and Wol-
verine Band. With the exception
of the Marching Band, which is
open only to men, both men and
women from all colleges in the
University may apply for mem-
bership.
However, membership in the
Bandsis determined by audition
with Prof. Revelli and his assist-
ants. Auditions for the Wolverine
and Symphony Band are held dur-
ing registration week. Auditions
for the Marching Band are held
on Sunday afternoon preceding re-
gistration week, at 2:30 p.m.,
Sept. 12, in Harris Hall.
Marching Band
The Marching Band is most ac-
tive during the fall football season
and it plays for games and pep
rallies. The Marching Band also
accompanies the football team on
at least two out-of-town trips. This
year trips are scheduled to North-
Western and Ohio State University.
A recent band trip to Ohio State

has a membership of approximate-
ly 115 pieces. Possessing one of
the largest band libraries in the
nation, it gives numerous concerts
go into the Chicago area, where
during the year and each spring
goes on tours to all parts of the
nation.
This year, the band will make
two tours. A midwinter tour will
go into the Chicago area, where
the band was specially chosen to
perform for the final band concert
of the American Bandmaster's
Association in Elkhart, Ind., Feb.
19.
The second tour, lasting ten-
days, will go to Canada, New
York and Massachusett~ -where it
may play in Boston's Symphony
Hall-and will give its concluding
concert at Carnegie Hall at Easter
time.
In the past, such distinguished
guest conductors as Percy Grain-
ger, Morton Gould, Edwin Franko
Goldman, and Ferde Grofe have
conducted the Symphony Band.
Wolverine Band
The Wolverine Band centers its
program around different extra-
curricular activities. It plays for
basketball games, an occasional
hockey game, local parades, and
different other activities. The
Band is recommended for those

Wide Fame
given "on the mall" in previous
years, but will take place behind
Mason Hall (near the Diag and the
General Library) next spring be-
cause the location is accoustically
better.
U' Fraternity
System 110
Years of Age
For 110 years, the fraternity
system at Michigan has occupied
an important spot in campus life.
Its objectives include not only
the pursuance of a well rounded
social life, but also integration inj
all campus activities. Each of the
43 social fraternities conducts a
formal rushing program under the
direction of the Interfraternity
Council at the beginning of each,
semester. At this prospective mem-
bers may investigate the advan-
tages of fraternity life.
Because all freshmen men live
in dormitories,.students may move
into fraternity houses during their
sophomore year. Fraternities, like
dormitories, serve three meals a
day.
Three fraternities on the Uni-
versity campus have house moth-
ers. Fraternities engage in their
own league of athletic events, co-
ordinated into the Intra-Mural
Sports program. Trophies ,'are
awarded and are welcomed addi-
tions to house collections.
Among fraternity social activi-
ties are weekend parties, football
luncheons, Mother's Day after-
noons, parents weekends and for-
mal dinner dances.

Drama
Season
One of the highlights of the
spring season at Ann Arbor is
the University Drama Season.
The drama season generally
opens the middle of May and
runs until the middle of June,
presenting five plays with
Broadway stars during this pe-
riod.
Last year, the drama seasonI
included "The Crucible," The
Little Hut," "The Trip to
Bountiful," "The Gramercy
Ghost" and "Sabrina Fair."
Such big name performers as
June Lockhart, Lillian Gish,
John Dall and Barbara Bel
Geddes took part in them.
The plays to be presented
and stars to appear in them are
generally announced in April
and tickets go on sale around
the first of May.
Senior Class Gift
A map of the campus enclosed
in a glass and stainless steel cab-
inet will be the senior class gift to
the University.
The cabinet, which is to be
erected early this semester, will
be placed on the corner of North
University and State Street.

BICYCLES
Join the thousands of Ann Arborites who
save time and shorten distances by cycling.
ENGLISH BICYCLES
3-SPEEDS
as low as HAND BRAKES
$9.95

Shop at SEARS
and SAVE!

I'

Shop

at SEARS for. *.*

USED
BICYCLES
BICYCLE
RENTALS
Hour-Day-Month

24-Hour
REPAIR
SERVICE
BICYCLE
STORAGE

Men's clothes, shoes
Women's purses, shoes, hose,
lingerie
Sporting Goods, Bikes
Drafting supplies
Curtains, drapes, towels,
sheets, pillows
Unpainted furniture
Housewares, paint
Hardware, auto supplies
TV Sets, Hi-Fi, table,
console radios, phonographs

BICYCLE ACCESSORIES

I

Campus Bike & Hobby

514-16 E. William

Call NO 2-0035

NOrmandy
2-5501

SEARS

312 South
Main St.

NEAR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1--

eM I

.....""

was marked by a blizzard and a
frigid bus-ride, so members are
hoping for more weather cooper-
ation this year.
Internationally f a m o u s, the
Marching Band has been the sub-:
ject of a special short feature,
"Here Comes the Band," produced
by RKO picturesBand has also
had a feature article in "Life"
magazine.
Symphony Tours
The University Symphony Band

without enough proficiency to
qualify for the Symphony or
Marching Band, and for those
who do not have the time to de-
vote to the extensive rehearsals
required by those other bands.
For all bands, certain of the lar-
ger instruments will be provided
free of charge by the University.
Concerts in Ann Arbor are given in
Hill Auditorium. During the spring
however, there are out-of-doors
concerts. These concerts have been

THE MUSIC CENTER WELCOMES YOU
TO THE BEAUTIFUL CAMPUS
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

SCHOOL OPENING SPECIAL
to STUDENTS!
1954 PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
ROYAL - REMI NGTON - CORONA - UN DERW OOD

$20 Trade-In Sale
Your old portable
regardless of age
is worth $20 when you
purchase a new portable.

" Classical
Record
Department
" Radios,
Phonographs
and Combi-
nations
" Television

* Popular
Record
Department
" Tape
Recorders
" Radio and
TV Service

$9.45
All-Metal 2 Drop-Leaf
TYPEWRITER STAND
Free!
with the purchase of a new
portable typewriter.
Rental Service

FAVORITE MEETING PLACE FOR U OF M STUDENTS

Largest Jazz Selection in Ann Arbor!
WIDE SELECTION of CLASSICAL LP's

I

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III

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