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September 15, 1954 - Image 13

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-15

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WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE 2

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1177 ) A A ,s f n 1~aTrN A i PTTr7T T1Tv+c_ 1

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tir12J11JAUnV(TA Pride'salelegLg
Union. Provides Male Meeting Place

Facilities Extended Throu gh
Additional Construction Work

University men will find even
more facilities for their felaxation
and recreation inside the ivy
trimmed walls of the Union this
year.
For almost the entire summer,
the Union, campus menus club
founded by students more than 40
years ago, has been the site of
construction. A $2,250,000 project
to enlarge the brick building by
the addition of a wing was begun
early In July.
Extended Facilities
The new Union wing, expected
to be completed by the first of
the year, will provide room for
widening the basement's north
cafeteria, which is open to men
and women. Men enjoy exclusive
rights in the south cafeteria.
A snack bar and tap room is al-
so planned for the basement of the
new wing.
On the first floor, kitchen facil-
ities forthe main dining room will
be expanded. The Anderson Room,
site of uncounted banquets and
special dinners, is also scheduled
for enlargement.
Only addition to the second
floor, which houses the billiard
room, the main ballroom, ping-
pong tables, lounges, and the Pen-
dleton Library, will be a corridor
along the front of the new wing.
The corridor will be lined with
booths for listening to records. It
has been planned with an eye to-
ward future building on the front
of the Union and on the second
and third floors. C
Extensive improvements in the
plumbing and electrical facilities'
that keep the Union's many serv-
ice's in operation are also on the
blueprints.
Services Offered
The new wing will supplement
the numerous services already of-
fered by the four-story landmark
to students. Besides billiards and
ping-pong for the students' spare
time, there is a bowling alley in
the sub-basement and a swimming

members of the Union and their
guests.
All male University students
automatically become members of
the Union upon payment of tuition
fees. Their students' identification
cards are punched by Union offi-
cials at registration, enabling them
to use of Union facilities.
Besides its elaborate physical fa-
cilities, the Union carries on an
extensive program in student acti-
vities under the direction of the
Student Offices, where students
interested in planning dances, mo-
vies and colorful stage shows like
the annual Union Opera or talent
contests such as Gulantics, are al-
ways welcome.
Visitors to the campus can find
comfortable accomodations in the
Union's approximately 20s-room
hotel. Lodging accomodations are
especially popular on football
weekends when the Union becomes
a bedlam of excitement and post-
grame celebrations.
Women Allowed
Although the Union is a men's
club, women are allowed liberal
use of the building, with the ex-
ception of the front door. It has
long been a tradition that women
may not enter or exit through the
front; but recently violations of
this taboo have gone more and
more unnoticed.
Long the scene of many special
events, the Union's popularity is
evideneed by its share of satirical
criticism. Students enjoy poking
fun at the basement cafeteria and
the tables where seniors carve
their initials every year. But stu-
dents insist it's all in pursuit of
humor and continue to take ad-
vantage of the Union's numerous
services and faciliites.
A University alumna, Prof. Mar-
jorie Nicolson, of Columbia Uni-
versity's English department, was
honored by the American Associa-
tion of University Women as this

'Opera Time'
At 'U' Means
Union Opera
When it's Opera time at the
University of Michigan, the talk is
not of Wagner or Verdi.
Although the name sometimes
confuses those not acquainted with
its colorful history, the Michigan
Union Opera is an all-male musi-
cal comedy written and produced
by students at the University of
Michigan.
The name "Union Opera" was
first coined in 1908 when a group
of students organized the Opera
as a means of enjoyment and
fund-raising for the Michigan Un-
ion. Since that time the name has
persisted, despite objections that
some come to the show expecting
an evening of grand opera.
Standing Room Only
During its 46 year history,Union
Opera has put on standing-room-
only performances in the home
country of legitimate opera-New
York's Metropolitan Opera House
and the Chicago Civic Opera
House.
The Union Opera is sponsored
by the Mimes Society, an honorary
elective society which each year
takes in the outstanding partici-
pants of past performances. The
Mimes membership is made up of
such personalities as Governor
Thomas E. Dewey, Valentine Da-
vies, author of "Miracle on 34th
Street" and Robert Q. Lewis, tele-
vision and radio star.
At the time of this printing the
name and theme of the Opera for
the '54 season has not been an-
nounced. Be sure to follow The
Daily for this information and for
information concerning tryouts
for the Opera itself and for com-
mittee work in a supporting roll.
Supporting committee work is
open to women as well as men.
Village defense societies are be-
ing formed in Pakistan.

Art Loans
Close to 900 University Art
Loan prints, running the gamut
from old masters to modern
artists, and from realism to ab-
stract cubism are made avail-
able to students each semester
at a rental price of 50 cents.
The collection of prints was
begun in 1947 when a Detroit
department store made a gift
of 400 framed prints to the Uni-
versity for student use on a
rental basis.
Plans for distribution of the
prints will be announced when
students return to Ann Arbor.
Union Headed
By Leopold
Heading the Union this year are
Tom Leopold, '55,and Dick Pink-
erton, '55, who hold the top posts
of president and secretary, respec-
tively.
The 1954 Union Opera Commit-
tee for 1954 is comprised of Bob
Hoffman, '56E, production chair-
man; Jay Grant, '55, general
chairman; Bob Gillow, '56 road
show manager; Howie Boasberg,
'56, general secretary; Harold
Johnson, '55SM, music chairman;
Stu Lerman, '56, program chair-
man, and Guy Moulthrop, '56E,
promotions chairman.
There are 10 known species of
crocodile.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

1954-55
UNIVERSITY -MUSIC SOCIETY

C

I

Seventy-Sixth Annual Choral Union Series

ROBERTA PETERS, Soprano
THE SOCI1ETA CORELLI

. . . . Monday, October 4
. . . . . Friday, October15

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHCHESTRA Tuesday, March 15
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor

THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
JORGE BOLET, Pianist . . *
LEONARD WARREN, Baritone
VIENNACHOIRBOY ..
ZINO FRANCESCATTI, Violinist

SundayNovember 7
Monday, November 15
. Sunday, November 21
. Sunday, January16
. . . Monday, March 7

BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Tuesday, March 7
WI LHELM FURTWANGLER, Conductor
NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC-SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
. . . . . . . . .Sunday, May 22
DIMITRI MITROPOULOS, Conductor
Season Tickets: Remaining unclaimed seats in Block A, $17.00; Block B, $14.00;
Block C, $12.00; Block D, $10.00

pool. The latter is open only to 'year's outstanding woman scholar.

rI.

Yf

,4 .,. . ,
!.:ii~'

Ninth Annual Extra Concert Series

ELEANOR STEBER, Soprano

Sunday, October 10

CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA OF AMSTERDAM

THE NEXT PLAY

EDUARD VAN BEINUM, Conductor
THE ROBERT SHAW CHORALE
ROBERT SHAW, Conductor
ISAAC Stern, Violinist . .
WALTER GIESEKING, Pianist

. . Wednesday, October 27.
. . Monday, December 6
Thursday, February 10
. Tuesday, March 22

I'S

FOR

J

Season Tickets: Block A, $8.50; Block B, $7.00; Block C, $6.00; Block D, $5.00

I

CHESTER ROBERTS
Gifts for All Occasions
Accessories for your room

,'

Annual Christmas Concerts

"MESSIAH" (Handel) .
LUC INE AMARA, Soprano
LILLIAN CHOOKASIAN, Contralto
CHARLES CURTIS, Tenor

. . . December 4 and 5, 1954
DONALD GRAMM, Bass
CHORAL UNION and ORCHESTRA
LESTER McCOY, Conductor

V

Tickets: 75c and 50c (either concert. On sale beginning October 15.
Fifteenth Annual Chamber Music Festival

101

"i

BUDAPEST STRING QUARTET

. February 18, 19, 20, 1955

HALLMARK GREETING CARDS
Largest Selection of Cards on the Campus

Season Tickets: $3.50 and $2.50. On sale beginning October 15.
Sixty-Second Annual May Festival

I

SIX CONCERTS

. . . . . . . . May 5,

6, 7, 8, 1955

The Philadelphia Orchestra, EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. University
Choral Union, THOR JOHNSON, Guest Conductor, and LESTER McCOY,
Associate Conductor. Festival Youth Chorus, MARGUERITE HOOD, Con-

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