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September 22, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1954

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PAGE THREE

9'

1INIAA BR1AINVDD SLFISH':

Pro Ball Will

Bell Blasts Crisler for Pro Ball Stand Take Ritter

AJ

Bert Bell, commissioner of the
National Football League, lashed
out at members of the National
Collegiate Athletic Association in
a statement concerning the rela-
tions between the two organiza-
tions.
Four high college officials were
stamped as "ringleaders" in a
move to "severe years of harmo-
nious relations between college and
pro ball."
The list of men who were called
"isolationists and selfish men" in-
cluded Herbert O. (Fritz) Crisler,
the University of Michigan's athlet-
Jensen Sets
Unenviable Mark
BOSTON (JP)-Jackie Jensen of
the Boston Red Sox got into the
lajor League record books yes-
terday, but he isn't going to cele-
brate the event.
Jensen hit into his 32nd,-double
play of the year in the first inning
of the first game of a doubleheader
with the Philadelphia Athletics at
Fenway Park.
The previous major league high
for a season was 31 set by Bobby
41 Doerr, formerly of the Red Sox.

ic director; Kenneth L. (Tug) Wil-
son, commissioner of the Big Ten;
Tom Hamilton, athletic director
at the University of Pittsburgh;
and Ted Payseur, athletic direc-
tor at Northwestern University.
Bell Defends NFL
Apparently angered at recent
attacks on the pro league's new
policy to televise games on Satur-
day afternoons and evenings, Bell
spoke out against the four off i-
cials, stating that they were upset
over the National League's "elab-
borate nationwide television pro-
gram." Bell added that the NFL in-
tends to "give the public all the
television we can."
Crisler termed Bell's steam-let-
ting at himself and the three other
officials as nothing to get excited
over. "We're not declaring war on
professional football. We are try-
ing to separate all that is extra-
neous from college football, and if
trying to promote our own game is
isolationist, I presume we are
guilty."
Bell announced further that Wil-
son, Payseur, Hamilton and Crisler
and others are set against unlimit-
ed television of grid games because
Notre Dame would undoubtedly
get most of the offers for televis-
ing of their games, "These selfish

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men have banded together to' keep
Notre Dame in the same boat with
them," he explained, and added
that "they hide behind that 'pro-
tect the small college' stuff, but When th
you don't notice them scheduling around wl
small colleges to help out, do Fisher will
you?" he had cou
Crisler argued Bell's point on igan in its
the question of restricted televi- Ten Confe
sion. He said, "I don't believe Outfielde
we're alone in restricting televi- Pitcher Jac
sion. I think I've heard of the pro- their senior
fessionals 'blacking out' areas on a crack a
telecasts. I guess if we do it, it balL
is restricted and if they do it, it Lepley
is not." Lepley, w
several clu
the Detroit
arsty H ds mer he pl2
^'r A-.- -a Tiger cla

Lepley
he baseball season ro
xt spring. Coach R
be minus two play
nted on to help Mic
quest for another F
rence championship.
r Paul Lepley a
ck Ritter have given
>r year of eligibilityf
Lt Major League bas
Signs With Detroit
'ho received offers fro
bs, chose to sign wi
Tigers. The past sur
ayed for Wilkes Bar
ass A farm te am Un

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~ay
ers
Big
up
for
ti
il

Yankees, Boston Record Wins;
Giants Whip Brooklyn Again
NEW YORK (M - Bob Grim be-
came the New York Yankees' first ers Monday night, but all regu-
20-game winning rookie since Russ lars except Hank Thompson and
Ford in 1910 as he held Washing- I Wes Westrum started against left-
ton to four hits yesterday for a 3-1 handed Johnny Podres.
victory. Bobby Hofman, filling in for
* * * Thompson at third base, hit a
BOSTON (R - Jackie Jensen's home run with the bases loaded
10th-inning single broke up the following singles by Don Mueller
first game and his three run ho-i and Willie Mays and a walk to
mer, no. 25 for the season, decided Monte Irvin in the first inning.
the second yesterday as the Boston Mays, who took over the league
Red Sox swept a doubleheader batting lead from Brooklyn's
from Philadelphia by identical 4-3 Duke Snider during Monday
scores. night's clinching ceremonies, held
While Jensen was raising his tight to first place with two hits
RBI total to 115, Billy Goodman in three trips for .346. Snider went
went on a batting spree for the out-for-four at .340.
Sox --gathering seven hits in-I * * *
cluding three doubles during the CHICAGO ()-The Chicago
long afternoon which finished un- Cubs scored their sixth sweep of
der the lights. 30 doubleheaders this season by
Russ Kemmerer, fourth Boston beating St. Louis twice, 4-3, in 10
hurler, was the winner of the first innings, and 3-2 in a six and a
game and John Dixon the loser. half inning second match before
Frank Sullivan won his 14th 2,119 fans yesterday afternoon.
game in the nightcap against 12 Steve Bilko and Ralph Kiner
defeats with two of the runs com- clouted loser Harvey Haddix for
ing on Jim Finigan's seventh home homers in the bob-tailed night-
run in -the fourth inning and Bill cap after Gene Baker's single
eRnna's 13th in the sixth. scored Frankie Baumholtz in the
* * * 110th inning with the winning run
BROOKLYN (MP)-Clinching the in the opener.
National League pennant didn't Cleveland's bid for its 110th vic-
halt the New York Giants who tory of the season was at least
rode over Brooklyn Tuesday, 5-2, temporarily delayed last night
on a five-hit pitching job by when the Chicago White Sox
Ruben Gomez and Jim Herarn. humbled the Tribe, 9-7, dt Cleve-I
The Giants eliminated the Dodg- land.
Major League Standings

. mA '1 i.,'.-n +anvv T.4Uln
D efense Urg ils he broke his leg in a play at first
base, he was batting at a sharp
Coach Bennie Oosterbaan ran the .326 pace.
Wolverine grid squad through its Ritter, who signed with the Mil-
regular Tuesday defensive drills waukee Braves, pitched on three
yesterday in preparation for this teams. He started with Toledo, a
weekend's opener against Washing- triple A club in the American As-
ton at Seattle. sociation. After a short stretch
The practice stressed fundamen- there, he moved to Jacksonville,
tals and worked over the multiple where he established a 1-1 record
defenses that are employed against in class A ball. His third move was
T formation squads with a passer to Evansville, Ind. There he en-
such as the Huskies' Sandy Leder- tered the Three-I League and
man. Up to 30 different combina-'I hurled in class B competition.
tions will be at the use of the de- Fisher refrained from telling the
fensive eleven in an attempt to two Michigan standouts what steps
thwart Lederman's aerial barrage. t take last spring concerning
The players making the trip will their Major League offers, claim-
be announced, as usual, the night ng that it "wasn't any of my busi-
before the squad leaves, which will inthtt"ws'ayofmbu-
be about 8 o'clock Thursday morn-1 ness." Naturally he will feel the
ing. Oosterbaan plans to take 38 loss of their services, but he firm-
men, including his starting eleven ly believes that the decision to ac-
which is in good physical shape. cept or decline professional team,
Ground-gainer Tony Branoff, right bids should be that of the ball
halfback, who has been bothered players themselves.
by a lame knee, was back in uni- Fisher Hunts New Backstop
form and appeared in better con- One of Coach Fisher's primary
dition. worries is to find a suitable re-
Flying to Denver and then on to placement for former catcher Dick
Seattle, the team will work out Leach, who caught part of every
briefly Thursday and Friday in a game for the past three seasons.
tune up for Saturday's tilt under He pointed out the shortstop posi-I
"coastal climatic conditions." tion, played last spring by Moby
Benedict. as a strong defensive
Not in Ba -Yet spot, and hopes Benedict will be
able to improve sufficiently in the
LOS ANGELES () - Chuck hitting department to rate him
Dressen ,says he has had feelers with other top Big Ten infielders.
from Major League clubs for 1955 In any event, the Michigan base-
but any report that he has agreed ball squad, under Fisher, will un-
to terms is "only rumor." doubtedly compare favorably with
Dressen, who managed Brooklyn Wolverine teams of the past few1
to pennants in 1952 and 1953 then years.
resigned last year when tender-
ed only a one-year contract, pi-
loted Oakland to third place in Subscribe to
the Pacific Coast League this sea-
son. His Oaks then copped the The Michigan Daily
Governor's Cup playoffs.

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4

CHORAL

ROBERTA PETERS,

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Soprano

S "*

. Monday, October 4
. Friday, October 15

THE SOCI ETA CORELL I . .
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA .
GEORGE SZELL, Conductor
JORGE BOLET, Pianist . .
LEONARD WARREN, Baritone . *

. Wed., October

20

UNION

Sunday, November 7

,j

VIENNA CHOIR

BOYS

(2:30 P.M.)

Monday, November 15
Sunday, November 21
. Sunday, January 16
. . Monday, March 7

ZI NO FRANCESCATTI, Violinist

.

BERLIN PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Tuesday, March 15
WILHELM FURTWANGLER, Conductor

NEW YORK PHI LHARMON IC-SYMPHONY

(2:30 P.M.)

DIMITRI
EXTR

MITROPOULOS, Conductor . .
A CONCERT

Sunday, May 22
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ISAAC

STERN, Violinist

WALTER GIESEKWN
TICKET
Choral Union C(
Season Tickets
$17.00- Block
$14.00-Block
$12.00-Block
$10.00-Block

4G, Pianist

CONCERTGEBOUW ORCHESTRA OF AMSTERDAM

EDUARD

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Conduc tor

INFORMATION
oncerts Extra Concert Series
Season Tickets'
c A $8.50-Block A
SB $7.00-Block B
SC $6.00-Block C
cD $5.00-Block D
SINGLE CONCERTS
Both Series

Wednesday, October 27
Monday, December 6

ELEANOR STEBER, Soprano

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Sunday, October

THE ROBERT SHAW CHORALE
ROBERT SHAW, Conductor

10

. . . Thursday, February 10
Tuesday, March 22

U(Jed arnqdflew.

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Main Floor- Orchestra concerts, $3.50. Other concerts, $3.00
First Balcony-Orchestra concerts, $3.00. Other concerts, $2.50
Top Balcony, first 8 rows - Orchestras, $2.50. Other concerts, $2.00,
Top Balcony, rear- Orchestra, $2.00 & $1.50. Other concerts, $1.50

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