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January 14, 1955 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-T

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRTDAY, JANi

DRASTIC CHANGE:
UNESCO Budget Aimed
At Fewer Major.Projects

By ERNEST THEODOSSIN
A "drastic change" will come
over the character of UNESCO
according to Prof. Robert C. An-
gell of the sociology department.
Prof. Angell, a member of the
American delegation to the eighth
general conference of UNESCO
(United Nations Educational, Sci-
entific and Cultural Organization),
explained that this "change" was
inaugurated at the agency's con-
ference at Montevideo, Uraguay.
"In the past UNESCO has"done
many things witl' small amounts
of money. Beginning in 1957, about
half of the ten million dollar an-
nual budget will be devoted to a
relatively few major projects of
limited duration. These projects,
numbering about a half dozen, will
last from three to five years."
Lessen Criticism
"I think this particular decision
will do a great deal to lessen the
criticism against UNESCO," Prof.
Angell said.z
Present plans are that sugges-
tions for proposed projects are to
be drawn up and submitted to the
next general conference, which
will be held in New Delhi, India,
in 1956. At the conference final
voting vill take place and specific
programs instituted.
Prof. Angell explained that the
Montevideo conference, which was
held from Nov. 10 to Dec. 10 last

year, was the first such meeting of
UNESCO to include a delegation
from "Russia."
Russia Not Obstructive
"The Russians were feeling out
the situation a great deal of the
ime, and they were not very con-
structive. They didn't talk very
much. When they did speak it was
mainly to stress their country's
cultural growth," Prof. Angell said.
"They were continually telling
about the many new schools that
had been built in Russia. They also
claimed that present tensions were
the result of newspaper distort-
ions, implying that this went on
chiefly in capitalistic countries."
Prof. Angell's role in the confer-
ence was that of advisor on social
science matters. His background
includes a three-year term as
chairman of the U.S. National
Commissior's Committee on the
International Program of
UNESCO.
Present projects of UNESCO in-
clude programs for reducing world
illiteracy and acting as an advising
agency for developing arrid land
regions.
Baha.i Stud ents
Baha'i students at the Universi-
ty will celebrate the sixth annual
World Religion Day at 8 p.m. Sun-
day in the League.

PROF. KURT WEITZMANN
PROF. KURT WEITZMANN of
Princeton's Institute for Ad-
vanced Study will deliver the last
of a four-lecture series at 4 p.m.
today, Aud. B, Angell Hall on
"Latin Middle Ages: The End of
an Old Tradition and the Begin-
ning of a New."
Teen Interests
Shown in Art
On display until Peb. 5 in the
Architecture Bldg. lobby is teen-
age art showing an overall view
of what boys and girls are in-
terested in.
Students from the Woodrow
Wilson High School at Dallas and
the Lafayette Junior High School
in Elizabeth, New Jersey have
used a variety of media in their
paintings. Pencil and ink draw-
ings, water colors and tempra are
the most common media, although
casein, melted crayon and block
printing were also used.

Rabies Clinic
Will Be Held
Rabies clinics, sponsored by the
Washtenaw County Health De-
partment and the Veterinarians
Medical Association, will be held
throughout Washtenaw County
from Jan. 18-29.
Howard Hilton, health educator
with the department, said the cli-
nics are being held to help people
meet the Feb. 28th deadline for
getting licenses. "Rabies vaccina-
tion's are a prerequisite for ob-
taining licenses," Hilton noted.
A fee of $1.50 per dog will be
charged, Hilton said, adding "a
representative of the county or
township's treasurer's office will
be on hand at the clinic to handle
registration for dog licenses."
Ann Arbor dog owners can get
their dogs vaccinated at a clinic
held Jan. 18th from'4 to 7 p.m.
at the Armory. Other clinics in
this area are: Willow Village, Jan.
21st, 5 to 8 p.m. at the fire sta-
tion and Ypsilanti, Jan. 24th, 7
to 8:30 p.m. at Woodruff school.
Smith Elected
Prof. Allan F. Smith, of the Law
School, has been elected chairman
of the Senate Advisory Commit-
tee on University Affairs at the
University.
Prof. Angus Campbell, director
of the Survey Research Center,
was chosen vice chairman. Secre-
tary will be Prof. Walter Sanders,
chairman of the Architecture de-
partment.

Fed Trip
j.The story of a field trip
that took a School of Education
class to Mexico and back will
be told by Prof. Claude Eggert-
sen on "Michigan Report" at
5:15 p.m. tomorrow over'WWJ-
TV.
Last summer, a class in ed-
ucational theory and practice
flew to Patz Cuaro, Mexico,
where they observed a group of
Latin American student teach-
ers learning how to teach meth-
ods of survival.
Prof. Eggertsen, who accom-
panied the class, will discuss
with program host Prof. Don-
ald R. Pearce, of the English
department, how this unique
school, supported by UNESCO,
strives to raise the standard of
living among Latin Americans.
Noel Coward
Play To Open
"Private Lives" by Noel Coward
will be presented by the Ann Arbor
Civic Theater 8 p.m. Wed, through
Sat, at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater.
Fourth production of the 1954-
55 season, "Private Lives" is di-
rected by Ted Heusel, who will also
play the role of Victor Prynne, the
male lead.
Ruth Livingston will p 1 a y
Amanda Prynne, female lead. Sup-
porting cast includes Anthony Pas-
quariello, Harriet Bennet Tamme
and Gladys Hanson.
Box office will be open 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Mon. and Tues.

are worth real money.

Your Discontinued Textbooks

If sold to Ulrich's WITH your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST DEAL-FIGURE IT OUT
Ulrich's sell your discontinued books to over
600 college bookstores. This way we get the
highest possible prices for YOU. At least 25%'
of the books used this semester are now obso-
lete or discontinued.
-- another Ulrich service

WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS
Thai SLim Limooh slocI inks °

Ivy-Als by Wild's

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GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets,
Phone NO 2-1121
Wm. C. Bennett, Pastor
10:00-Sunday School
11:00-"The Reality of Love"
6:00 P.M.-Student Guild
7:30-"A Great Prayer"
Wednesday, 7:30-Prayer Meeting
We welcome you.

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
Father McPhillips
William and Thompson Sts.

Sunday Masses--
8:00 - 9:30 - 11:00 - 12-00
Daily-7:00 - 8:00 - 9:00
Novena Devotions-Wednesday
P.M.

evenings--

The difference in measurements gives the slacks an
entirely new slim silhouette. Knee measurements are
reduced to 21"; cuff measurements to 18" . . . an
adjustable buckle and strap is placed at the back of
the trousers for easy adjustment and low hip fit.

The authentic army Chino.'
Black. Waist sizes 28 to
inseams 29 to 34

Tan and
38. Cuff

$495

vf~tWILD'S L ~w
State Street on the Campus -
WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS WILDS S

I

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
AND STUDENT CENTER
1432 Woshtenow Ave.
Henry Kuizengo and George Laurent, Ministers
William S. Baker and Eduard Sue, University
Postors
9:15 and 11:00 A.M.-"Who Is God?" (second
in a series a fsermons on The Apostle's Creed)
6:45 P.M.-Old-fashioned hen-sing and biblical
charades for members of Westminister Stu-
dent Fellowship and their friends, followed
by vespers at 8:30 p.m.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
and WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 South State Street
Merrill R. Abbey, Erlond J. Wangdohl,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:30 A.M.-Discussion "Basic Christian Beliefs.
9:00 and 10:45 A.M.-Worship: "Life's Struc-
tural Steel." Dr. Abbey preaching.
The film "John Wesley" will be shown in the
Social Hall at 4:00, 6:00 and 8:00 P.M. The
Wesleyan Guild will attend the 6:00 P.M.
showing.
ST. NICHOLAS GREEK ORTHODOX
CHURCH
414 North Main
Rev. Father Eusebius . Stephanou
9:30 A.M.-Matins Service
10:30 A.M.-Divine Liturgy
Alternate Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.--Orthodox Stu-
dent Guild
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED
423 South Fourth Ave,
Walter S. Press, Pastor
Warren Winkler, Director of Student Work
10:45Worship Services, Sermon by Rev. Press "The
Consecration of Our Entire Life"
7:30-Student Guild
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill and Toppan Streets
Rev. George Borger, Minister
10:45-Morning Worship. Sermon: THE DIFFER-
ENCE THAT GOD MAKES
9:45 A.M.-Church School
CONGREGATIONAL-DISCIPLES STUDENT GUILD
7:00 P.M.-Congregational Church. Speaker:
Professor William Alston: "What Is Religion?"
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenow, Phone NO 2-0085
Edward H. Redman, Minister
Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Bailey, Advisor to Students
Mrs. Fay A. Kincald, Director of Religious
Education
Miss Betsy Gidley, Organist
10:00 A.M.-Unitarian Adult Group-Dr. Wil-
liam Leslie of History Department on "Prob-
lems in Civil Liberties."
11:00 A.M.--Service of Worship-Rev. William
D. Hammond on "So You Don't, Want Your
Child To Be Different."

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 East Huron, Phone NO 8-7332
Rev. C. H. Loucks, Minister
Beth Mahone, Asst, Student Advisor
Sunday,_January 16, 1955-
9:45-Guild studies Ephesians
11:00-The Price of God's Presents
6:45-Mrs. C. A. Harris will review "The
"The Mind Alive"
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING

Lone Hall
10:00 A.M.-Young Friends
11:00 A.M.-Meeting for Worship.
come.

Visitors Wel-

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium
(Formerly at Y.M.C.A.)
Sundays-10:15 A.M., 11:00 A.M., 7:30-P.M.
Wednesdays-7:30 P.M., Bible Study, G. Wheeler
Utley, Minister
Hear: "The Herald of Truth" WXYZ-ABC Net-.
work Sundays- 1:00-1:30 P.M.
ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPISCOPAL STUDENT FOUNDATION
306 North Division St.
The traditional festival of lights Sunday evening
at 8 p.m. with special music provided by the
Alice Crocker Lloyd Memorial Fund.
Sunday Services at 8, 9, 11 A.M., and 8 P.M.
Lectures on The Faith of the Church at 4:30 P.M.
Supper Club at 6:00 P.M.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenow Ave.
9:30 A.M.-Sunday School
11:00 A.M.--Sunday Morning Service
8:00 P.M.-Weenesdoy: Testimonial Service
A free reading room is maintained of 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor.
rowed or purchased.
Reading, Room hours are Monday, 11:00 A.M.
to 9 P.M.; Tuesday.Saturdoy 11:00 A.M. to
5 P.M.;.and Sunday 2:30 to 4:30 P.M.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER AND
CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill Street and Forest Avenue
Dr. H. 0. Yoder, Pastor
Sunday-
9:00 and 11:00 A.M.-Worship Services
10:00 A.M.-Bible Study-Parables
7:00-10:30 P.M.-Recreation and Refreshments.
Drop in for a break from your studies.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenow Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor

q

When a roommate gets you
a blind date with

and she

turns out to

M-man,-
.. . rittnr-ni cwActi nr 1

Sunday at 9:30 and at 10:45: Services, wit
pastor preaching on the subject, "When C
Was Called to Cana." (Holy Communi
both services) .

27

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