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January 11, 1955 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-11

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FOUR

T19E MICB Ii GAN DAILY

FO~ THE MICIUGAN DAILY

I

SOLUTIONS SCARCE:
'U' Classroom Shortage
May Affect Class Hours

By ARLIS GARON
Shortage of classroom space
may force literary college students
to select classes at less popular
hours, according to Prof. Paul S.
Dywer of the mathematics depart~-
ment, Chairman of the Commit-
tee on Class Study and Room As-
signment..
He indicated in making room
-ssignments, departments are be-
ing limited in the number of rooms
they can use at the most request-
ed hours of 9, 10, 11, Monday,
Wednesday, and Friday. Many de-
partments have been required to
make changes in their schedules,
arranging more 8 a.m., afternoon,
and Tuesday, Thursday classes.
Small Departments Affected
Unpopular hours affect the
smaller departments by creating
difficulty in getting students to
take courses scheduled at these
times, Prof. Dwyer explained.
More required courses during un-
popular hours in larger depart-
ments ease the situation.
Prof. Dywer says "Students Tmust
realize the situation.. As the en-
rollment) continues to increase
with the amount of facilities fix-

ed, we have to learn to make great-
er use of those available. If stu-
dents will cooperate by taking
more 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. classes,
the situation would be greatly re-
lieved,and the possibility of com-
pulsory Saturday classes lessen-
ed."
No Immediate Prospects
According -to Prof. Dwyer, there
are no immediate prospects in the
next few years fdr more space.
The Administration has request-
ed more building funds from -the
State Legislature; however, the
literary college having recently ac-
quired new buildings can't expect
additional ones.
If the University takes over the
old Ann Arbor high school, the
situation will be helped some, ac-
cording to Dean Burton D. Thuma,
assistant dean of the literary col-
lege. However, it would be two
years befo'e it can be put into use.
The committee has also been
studying the size of classrooms in
relation to the number of students
in them. Some large, classrooms
may be divided into two, allowing
more rooms. This has been done
to Rm. 25 Angell Hall and Rm.
1402 Mason Hall.
No More Cut Rooms
However, Josephine K. Hoff-
man, Supervisor of Office Service
and Room Scheduling, says she
doubts any more rooms can be cut
if lectures .stay as large. Large
classrooms are also needed during
exams.
Other proposals have been sub-
mitted to the committee

SL Books
Student Legislature's Inter-
national Exchange Committee
recently received four books,
"European Achievement in the
Homelands of the German Ex-
pelles," "Germany Reports,"
The Tragedy of Silesia," and
"Nothing for Fears," from the
Free University of Berlin.
In return for the books,
which will be put into cirucla-
tion in the main library, SL
is sending the Free University
a book dealing with the Uni-
versity
Research Post
Open in Brazil
A fellowship for graduate study
and research in Brazil during the
1955 academic year is available to
an American student,. according
to the Institute of International
Education.
Uniao Cultural Brasil-Estados
Unidos in Sao Paulo is offering the
award for study in any of the fac-
ulties of the University of Sao
Paulo and in the Portuguese
courses of the Uniao Cultural.
Knowledge of Portuguese or an-
other Romance language is nec-
essary as the recipient will be re-
quired to teach English a mini-
mum of six hours a week at the
Uniao. Candidates must be male
graduate students under 35 years
old, citizens of the United States.
Basis of selection will be aca-
demic ability, moral character,
personality, adaptability and
health.-'
Applications may be obtained
from the United States Student
Department of the Institute, 1
East 67th St., New York, N.Y.
Daiches To Speak
On Shakespeare
David Daiches, co-editor of
"Poems in English, 1930-1940,"
used by English 31 classes, will
speak on "Guilt and Justice in
Shakespeare" at 4:10 p.m. today'
in Auditorium A Angell Hall.

Law Course
Inadequate
In English
Lawyers and law students have
trouble expressing themselves well
in writing, according to Carl V.
Weygandt, Chief Justice of the
Supreme Court of Ohio.
In his article, "English, More
English," in the Journal of the
American Judicature Society, Chief
Justice Weygant quoted instances
which indicated that the main
complaint against Law School ed-
ucation is that not enough em-
phasis is placed on knowledge of
English and grammar. .
Admitting that the problem is
shared by practicing attorneys as
well, he quoted several examples
which illustrated the lack of gram-
matical knowledge among barris-
ters and even judges.
Several of the faculty at the
University Law School were of the
opinion that, while no special law-
English courses are taught here,
the problem is not so prevalent as
at the Ohio schools which Chief
Justice Weygandt used for refer-
ence.
The minimum 2.5 average from
an accredited college, as a require-
ment for entrance to the Univers-
ity Law School should provide suf-
ficient training in English, they
thought.

By DICK SNYDER
"Congressional investigations
have become the tool of clever pol-
iticians capitalizing on hysteria,"
G. Bromley Oxnam, Bishop of the
Washington Area of the Methodist
Chrurch, said in a speech given
in Ann Arbor Sunday night.
The bishop continually hit at the
"gross incompetency and irrespon-
sibility" of the House Un-Ameri-
can Activities Committee.
Bishop Oxnam drew consider-
ably on his experiences with the
Committee to illustrate his words.
In July 1953, he voluntarily went
before the group to deny charges
against him contained in files of
the Committee. During six hours
of testimony, the Bishop said the
Committee carried on "a new kind
of Ku Kluxism.
Produced Threat
In his speech, given at the First
Methodist Church as part of the
Henry Martin Loud lecture series,
the bishop said that the files of
investigating committees "instead
of contributing to security have
produced a very real threat to free-

dom." He referred to the files as
"government by dlossier."1
"To illustrate," Bishop Oxnam
said, "take the recent Ladejinsky
case. How can one uphold a system
which accuses a man of subversive
tendencies and with the same in-
formation clears him moments la-
ter?
The bishop stated that the
House Un - American Activities
Committee now has the names of
some million, Americans in its files.
Bishop Oxnam also attacked in-
vestigations of the teaching pro-
fession. "Why should this one
group be singled out for investi-
gation? ... why not doctors and
bankers as well?"
McCarthy-wasm"
At one point in his speech, Bish-
op Oxnam drew laughter when he
said "many people are hailing the
arrival of McCarthy-wasm." He
then soberly reminded the audi-
ence that there was a still exist-
ent threat to individual freedom
in this country.
In 1953, Bishop Oxnam told the
audience, it was not until he warn-
ed the Committee that he would'

'TOOL OF POLITICIANS':
Oxnam Calls Probes 'Irresponsible'

use influential power that he
gained a hearing. The Committee
chairman told the bishop that the
Committee did not vouch for the
accuracy of its files and would not
stand back of them.
If the committee would not sup-
port this "unverified and unevalu-
ated" material, the bishop ques-
tioned, "how can: they stamp on
it the official seal of the United
States Government and then pro-
ceed to pass it out to such organi-
zations as the American Legion?"
Definition of Communism -
In his speech, Bishop Oxnarn
ridiculed the committee's defini-
tion of Communism as "intellec-
tually stimulating." After giving
his own brief description of the
political, economic and social fac-
tor of Communism, the bishop
posed the question, "Wouldn't you
think that if this great body knew
anything at all, it would know
what Communism is? Here," he
continued, "is their enlightening
definition of it: 'a system by which
one small group seeks to rule the
world.'"

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Student-written one-act plays
will be presented by the speech
department at 8 p.m. Thursday
and Friday at the Lydia Mendel-
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"A Connecticut Comedy" by Leo
Rockas, of the English department,
ment, will be directed by Gladys
Riddle;
"The Foolish One" by Paul Re-
billot; directed by th- author;
"Careless Wilderness" by form-
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Reserved tickets at 30 cents each
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the Lydia Mendelssohn box office.

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