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January 11, 1955 - Image 2

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TWO

THE MICHIGAN , DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1955

TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JANUARY 11. 1955

.__ _ ..___ Y_ _ _

Congressional Irresponsibility
Behind Lattimore Case

THE OLD 83rd Congress earned itself a neat
piece of fame as the Congress that cen-
sured McCarthy, but unfortunately the work
of the ubiquitous Senator isn't removed that
easily.
The most serious ingredient of McCarthyism
was a rampant sense of irresponsibility. While
proclaiming himself as the only American with
enough responsibility to stand up against Com-
munism, McCarthy was nevertheless encour-
aging all brands of immorality that suited his
purpose. Federal employes were urged to bring
him secret documents, wire-tapping became
instituted as a popular Washington sport, a
rash claim became better than no claim at all.
WITH DRAMA played up and facts played
down, McCarthy capitalized on hysteria
to make a name for himself. It was with the
Lattimore case back in 1950 that the Senator
established his formula. Claiming 57 Commu-
nists in the State Department and 205 bad
security risks, he pulled out the name of
Johns Hopkins Professor Owen Lattimore as
the "top Russian espionage agent".in the Unit-
ed States.
The point is that McCarthy created an at-
mosphere. of irresponsibility that extended
beyond his own work. This was the atmosphere
in which Senator Flanders shouted vehement
anti-McCarthy insults that almost beat the
Wisconsin senator at his own game-and it
wasn't a good game.
* In the early days of the new Congress a
sober look at past mistakes seem to be in or-
der. The Lattimore case typifies McCarthy's
heritage. It stands out as a colosal fumbling
of an important investigation in foreign pol-
icy. As an example of Congressional action it
should rank as a neon warning to the young
84th.
BEHIND THE initial investigation of Latti-
more was the cold fact that China had fall-
en to the Reds. One of the important organi-
zations dealing with the Far East was a pri-
vate research group founded by educators and
businessmen known as the Institute of Pa-
cifle Relations. There was some question as to
how large a part the Institute had played in
influencing State Department policy on the
Far East and Lattimore, not only as a mem-
ber of the Institute, but also as one-time editor
of its Journal "Pacific Affairs," would natur-
ally figure in any inquiry on the IPR.
The China Lobby, protagonists of all-out
aid to Chiang Kai-Shek, had been taking the
more violent view that the IPR and Owen Lat-
timore were Communist-infected agents di-
rectly responsible for the State Department
Far Eastern policy and the subsequent loss of
China.
However, despite-the pressure of private in.
dividuals, there was a chance for sane probing
into China policy. The Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Subcommittee under Senator Millard
Tydings (D-Md.) had a chance to perfoim a
service-but all it succeeded in doing was set-
ting the dismal pattern of the Grand Circus
hearing which kicked up a lot of smoke, and
nothing else. The exploration of Far Eastern
policy became instead a run-down of pro-
fessional ex-CommunistsThe analysis of the
role of the Institute in influencing State De-
partment policy was almost entirely obscured
by cloak-and-dagger charges against Latti-
more.
THE WASTEFUL effort of the Tydings com-
mittee was practically inevitable as soon as
McCarthy came out with his charges of "top
.Russian espionage agent." Starting out in an
atmosphere of sensationalism, so successfully
generated by the Wisconsin senator, construc-
tive action was almost automatically ruled
out. The hearings became a succession of
charges and denials, with the atmosphere ne-
cessary for objective analysis clearly missing.
The Tydings committee finally ruled that the
charges against the IPR and Lattimore could
not be sustained. But what could be sustained,
as the McCarran Committee demonstrated in
1952, was Communist hysteria. Under the di-
rection of the late Senator Pat McCarran (D-
Nev.), the committee was out to prove that
Lattimore was a Communist-and if they

couldn't get him for Communism at least they
could nab him on a perjury charge.
McCarran's subcommittee on Internal Se-
curity found Lattimore guilty of perjury in his
testimony before them. The counts were taken
before the Grand Jury and Lattimore was in-

dicted for perjury in Dec., 1952 on the grounds
that he lied when he said:
1. He had never been a sympathizer or any
other promoter of Communism or Communist
interests.
2. He had not known until 1950 that Ch'ao-
ting Chi was a Communist.
3. He had not known in the late '30's that the
writer "Asiaticus" was a Communist.
4. He had not knowingly published articles by
Communists in Public Affairs.
5. He had met with the Russian Ambassador
after the Hitler-Stalin pact, not before as he
had testified.
6. He had not handled mail for Roosevelt
aide Lauchlin Currie during World War II.
7. His trip to Chinese Communist headquar-
ters had not been made by pre-arrangement
with the Communist Party.
Lattimore pleaded not guilty before the Grand
Jury and the Federal District Court presided
over by Judge Luther W. Youngdahl, former
Republican governor of Minnesota.
UDGE YOUNGDAHL is the one point of san-
ity in the entire case. He dismissed four
counts of the seven-point perjury charge, dis-
missing the first charge on the grounds that
it was "nebulous and indefinite" and in viola-
tion of the First Amendment. "When public
excitement runs high as to alien ideologies,"
said Youngdahl, "it is the time when we must
be particularly alert not to impair the ancient
land-marks set up in the Bill of Rights."
With the Justice Department's case consid-
erably weakened by Youngdahl's dismissal (de-
spite later restoration of 2 minor counts by the
Court of Appeals), it was decided to file a new
brief. A re-indictment of Lattimore was then
obtained on the following two counts:
1. That Lattimore had lied when he denied
being a follower of the Communist line."
2. That he had lied when he denied being a
"promoter of Communism or of Communist
interests."
The new charges were designed to overcome
Youngdahl's objections that "a jury should not
be asked to determine an issue which can be
decided only on conjecture."
At. the time of the second indictment, U.S.
Attorney Lee A. Rover filed an affidavit ask-
ing Youngdahl to disqualify himself from pre-
siding over the trial on the ground that his
former decision had shown "personal bias and
prejudice" It was an unusual interference
with judicial authority, but characteristic of
the comic-opera quality of the Lattimore case.
Youngdahl met the attack courageously,
sharply criticising the Justice Department in
a memorandum opinion which said in part:
"This is a ... hit-and-run attack which touch-
es any judge of the United States who here- .
after undertakes to hear this case." At pres-
ent, Youngdahl is trying Lattimore on the
second perjury indictment.
But what has the Lattimore case proven?
It has been a long down-hill progression from
an investigation of foreign policy to a perjury
trial on testimony submitted before a con-
gressional committee. However, the expense of
a perjury charge is only undertaken when
there is strong indication of disloyalty to the
country, but not enough evidence for a con-
viction. Thus McCarthy started out by accus-
ing Lattimore of being the "top Russian es-
pionage agent" in the United States and then
settled for a perjury charge when nothing else
could be proven against Lattimore.
BUT THERE IS no indication of disloyalty
in the case of Lattimore. There is no rea-
son to drag out a perjury charge on technical
points of testimony before the Committee un-
less Lattimore had been sabotaging the coun-
try-or in this case, influencing Far Eastern
policy along dangerous lines. Lattimore is being
tried on the grounds that he lied when he de-
nied being "a follower of the Communist line"
or a "promoter of Communist interests." And
yet there is nothing illegal in following Com-
munist policy, even if the charges of perjury
were true, unless there is also criminal espio-
nage involved. Nothing in the charges of per-
jury against Lattimore and nothing in the
facts of his case indicate any type of disloyalty
to the country.
Owen Lattimore finds himself in the un-
comfortable position of being involved in a
four-year character smear. He is part of a

long trial that has no other reason behind it
than to discredit his name. What the case does
show is congressional responsibility gone
wrong-it is up to the new Congress not to
make the same mistake.
-Debra Durchslag

DREW PEARSON:
McCarthy
Report
Dull
WASHINGTON - Pugnacious
Sen. Herman Welker of Idaho and
handsome Sen. George Smathers
of Florida returned on the same
boat together from South Ameri-
ca and almost got into a fistfight.
Welker, sometimes called the
"Junior Senator McCarthy" and
whose picture is currently featur-
ed on the cover of Gerald L. K.
Smith's magazine, "Cross and
Flag," was sore as a boil over the
Senate vote to censure his friend
from Wisconsin. All during the
voyage he was loud and raucous
in his defense of McCarthy and his
castigation of Joe's critics.
He especially taunted Smathers
on the fact that the Democrats
voted in a bloc against McCarthy.
"I understand that you people
decided to make it uanimous at
a secret meeting," Welker chided
his Democratic Colleague from
Florida.
Smathers denied this, said Dem-
ocrats votedhtheir own convictions.
"Ha ha ha!" laughed the Idaho
senator sarcastically. "How do you
know they didn't have a secret
caucus, since you were in South
America at the time?"
Smathers replied that he was
sure of it because he knew how
the Democrats operated, and he
was certain no secret caucus had
been called.
"Are you calling me a liar?"
snarled Welker.
By this time the conversation
had become loud and bitter. Ab-
ruptly Welker squared off ready
to fight. Smathers squared off, too,
but Sen. Andrew Schoeppel of
Kansas stepped in. The two men
separated.
Joe's Last Report
SENATOR McCarthy won't like
it, but this column is scooping
him on his final report as Chair-
man of the Government Opera-
tions Committee.
Though McCarthy hit the head-
lines almost every day of his ca-
reer as chairman, his report is as
dull as dishwater. Obviously his
flair for the spotlight is consider-
ably greater than his desire to
make a constructive record of his
committee's accomplishments. The
report also shows that McCarthy
devoted scant time to his over-all
committee, chiefly concentrated on
his subcommittee on Communism.
Portions of his report are so ab-
rupt and deadpan as to be amus-
ing. For instance, his only men-
tion of the famous Army-McCar-
thy hearings, which absorbed the
nation for weeks; is a complaint
over the cost.
"A special subcommittee was
appointed on April 20, 1954, to con-
duct hearings on charges and
countercharges involving Secre-
tary of the Army Robert T. Ste-
vens, John G. Adams, H. Struve
Hensel; and Senator Joe McCar-
thy, Roy M. Cohn and Francis P.
Carr," observes the McCarthy re-
port, deadpan.
"This subcommittee was autho-
rized to expend funds (approxi-
mately $25,000) for its investiga-
tive activities. A resolution pro-
viding for reimbursement of these
funds to the Senate Permanent
Subcommittee on Investigations
was reported favorably on July 28,
1954, but no action was taken, and
the Subcommittee was not reim-
bursed for these extraordinary ex-
penditures."

ASIDE FROM this, the final Mc-
Carthy report ranges over a
lot of miscellaneous subjects irl-
eluding money spent on bathing
beaches and recreation in Hawaii
-by the armed forces.
(Copyright, 1955, by the Bell Syndicate)
Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of
the University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig ......Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers.............City Editor
Jon Sobeloff.........Editorial Director
Pat Roelofs ......Associate City Editor
Becky Conrad .........Associate Editor
Nan Swinehart......Associate Editor
Dave Livingston ..... ...Sports Editor
Hanley Gurwin ... Assoc. Sports Editor
Warren Wertheirner
..r.e....r... Associate Sports Editor
Roz Shimovitz .......Women's Editor
Joy Squires ..Associate Women's Editor
Janet Smith . Associate Women's Editor
Dean Morton ..... Chief Photographer
Business Staff
Lois Pollak........Business Manager
Phil Brunskiil, Assoc. Business Manager
Bill Wise.........Advertising Manager
Mary Jean Monkoski .Finance Manager

0

.:, U

#'You Mean Little O' Me?"

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FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SECHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC,
January 17 to January 27, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time of
class is the time of the 'first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

.t

*

TODAY AND TOMORROW:
Message Shows Ike's
Shift Toward Reality
By WALTER LIPPMANN
AS BETWEEN his first message delivered two years ago just after
he became President and the message of last week, there is a mark-
ed change in the President's thinking. The change is not in his moral
aims but in his ideas about high policy. He has changed his concep-
tion of what can be done in foreign policy, of what must be done in
the management of the national economy, and of what should be
done in regard to what is often called the welfare state.
* * * *
IN 1953 HE BELIEVED that Mr. Dulles and he could define "a new
positive foreign policy" which would put an end to what he called
"the posture of paralyzed tension." This was to be done by what was
then known as psychological warfare. It was hoped and believed that
by public propaganda, diplomatic declarations, the signature of pacts,
the holding of conferences, and by clandestine non-military operations,
the Western world would begin to roll back the Communist empire.
There is no trace of that notion remaining in the 1955 message.
Its aim is to find and if possible to stablize a modus vivendi with the
Communist world.
THE 1955 MESSAGE is notably different from 1953 in its theory of
the government's relation to the ups and downs of the national econ-
omy. In 1953 the President's mes-
sage sounded as if he believed that 1955 is copying the Democrats.
the balancing of the budget was The great realities of foreign pol-
the paramount consideration. In icy, of the national economy, and
1955, with a balanced budget not of the welfare measures of a dem-
yet in sight, he has recommended ocratic state are not a private pos-
a program which puts the national sion of the Democrats. The truth
defense and the expansion of the of the matter is that the Demo-
economy and the welfare state crats came to power some twenty
ahead of the balancing of the bud- years ago when the very survival
get. of the democratic government

MONDAY
TUESDAY

(at
(at
lat
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday, January 19
Saturday, January 22
Tuesday, January 25
Monday, January 17
Tuesday, January 18
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Monday, January 24
Wednesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursdiay, January 20
Monday, January 17

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5



SPECIAL PERIODS
Literature, Science and the Arts

English 1, 2
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 31, 32
Russian 1
Political Science 1
Sociology 1, 54, 60
Spanish 1, 2, 31, 32
German 1, 2, 11. 31
Chemistry 1, 3, SE, 20, 23
Psychology 31

Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 26

i
T
t

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

In regard to welfare legislation
the difference between the two
messages is not, strictly speaking,
in the theory. The difference is in
the scope and the amount of the
welfare measures. Whereas two
years ago the President seemed to
feel that welfare measures were
something to be conceded reluct-
antly, in 1955 they kindle his en-
thusiasm. This difference in de-
gree is so considerable that it is
really a difference in kind.
* * *
DO NOT believe that the evo-
lution of President Eisenhower's
thinking is explained fairly or tru-
ly by saying that he has become
interested in politics and is bid-
ding for Democratic and inde-
pendent votes. The real reason for
the change is that in 1953 he was
still a theorist without practical
experience in these matters. He
had only recently begun to think
seriously about the problems of
high policy. In 1955 he has had
two years tdl test his theories by
the hard realities.
In 1955 the theories have had to
give way to the facts of life. He
had found that in spite of what
the advertising blurbs promised,
psychological warfare is not a way
of causing the great Communist
imperial coalition to break down
and to recede. He has found, too,
in his practical experience with
Indo-China last spring, what it is
like to look over the rim of hell
into the abyss of total war. He has
felt it in himself, who had the
awful responsibility of the deci-
sion, he knows how Congress and
the people really feel about it, how
our allies feel. In these two years
he has adjusted his aims, which
were dreamed up before he took
office, to the real nature of the
world and of the times we live in.
Practical experience, too, has
taught him that the paramount
consideration at home is not the
balancing of the budget but the
balancing of the national econ-
omy. There has been just enough
recession to reveal how disastrous
it would be if the recession were
allowed to become worse. And this
has made him more than willing
to listen to those of his advisers
who belong to the modern school
of economics
* * *
THERE is not much sense in

against upheaval within and
against aggression abroad demand-
ed governments which could ad-
just themselves to the realities of
this century. There is no escaping
these realities.
The real trouble with the so-
called right - wing Republicans,
who deplore the present Eisenhow-
mistakes, which were many and
serious, made by the Democrats,
they prefer to think that somehow
the modern realities should never
have come
(Copyright. 1955, N.Y. Her. Trib., Inc.)

English 11
Drawing 3
M.I.E. 136
C.E. 23, 151
Drawing 1
M.I.E. 135
C.M. 107
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54,
101, 153
Drawing 2
E.E. 5
P.E. 31. 32
E.M. 1, 2
C.M. 113, 115
Chemistry 1, 3, 5E, 20, 23

Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Priday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
Tuesday, January 25

DAILY
OFFICIAL
13ULLE TIN

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Literature, Science and the Arts
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building before January 7 forinstruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board.

INTERPRETING THE NEWS

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editortal responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1955
Vol. LXV, No. 78
Notices
1955 Parking Permits: Will all those
whose cars now carry the 1955 license
plate please apply for and affix the
1955 parking permit decalcomania. Any
cars bearing 1955 license plates which
do not carry 1955 parking permits will
be subject to parking violation on and
after January 15, 1955.
Union Speech Contest Feb. 16. Entry
forms and rules can be obt~tined at
the Union Student Offices from 3:00
to 5:00 p.m. Mon. thru Fri. Deadline
for entries is Feb. 11. Prizes will be
awarded 1st, 2nd,and 3rd place win-
ners.
Choral Union Members are reminded
of the full rehearsal tonight at 7:00
p.m. sharp. Members are requested to
come early enough to be seated on
time. Also, members with good attend-
ance records are reminded courtesy
passes to the vienna Choir Boys' con-
cert (Sun. afternoon, Jan. 16) will be
issued on Fri. of this week, between

4,

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP Foreign News Analyst
T WILL be surprising if UN Secretary Gen-
eral Hammarskjold returns from Peiping
without some offer of'a deal from the Red Chi-
nese for liberation of the -American airmen
they hold as spies. That indicates there is a
chance the airmen will be freed.
The intensification of Red bomb attacks on
Nationalist-held islands and the violence of
Peiping's broadcast tirades against the United
States seem to be setting the stage for driving
a bargain through which Peiping can, in its
estimation, come off the winner.
If Peiping is to make a gesture, this is the

the West has no interests in common with the
East. More than that, it indicates Asian lead-
ers still believe firmly in the bogey of Western
colonialism, connect the United States with
such colonialism, and are convinced Asian
and African peoples, acting in concert, can rout
colonialism from its last strongholds.
Peiping, fully aware of the fears, frustra-
tions and hallucinations of Asian leaders, has
done little to ease their minds. Instead it has
stepped up its bombing of the Nationalist is-
lands
ALL THIS sets the stage. Tension is in-
creased. Peiping is in a good position to
pna +hatt +naain_ Evn mithout anv maior

or Mechanical Engineer, Junior Elec-
trical Engr., Dentist, Assist. Dir. of
Group Work and Recreation, Mech. E.
Draftsman, Elect. E. Draftsman, Health
Officer Grade 4, Health Publicity Assist.,
and Assist. Dir. of Youth Guidance. For
further information regarding educa-
tion and experience requirements con-
tact the Bureau of Appointments, Ext.
371, Room 3528 Admin. Bldg.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
A representative from the following
will interview at the Bureau of Appoint-
ments. For appointments contact the
Bureau, Ext. 371, 3528 Admin. Bldg.
Thurs., Jan. 13
Sunbeam Corp., Farmington, Mich.-
Feb. men in LS&A and BusAd for Sales
Positions anywhere in country.
Argus Camera Co., Ann Arbor, Mich.
-Men in LS&A and BusAd for Sales
and General Administration.
Lectures

Room 248, West Engrg. Bldg. This pub-
lication contains valuable information
on engineering and other types of in-
dustrial employment opportunities. It
is recommended that all engineers grad-
uating in 1955 obtain a copy for pres-
ent and future reference.
Important meeting of the Lit. School
Steering Comm. at 4:00 p.m. in Dean
Robertson's office.
Seminar: Dr. Donal4 Merchant,
"Quantitation in tissue culture studies
as applied to long term cell cultiva-
tion." Room 2501 East Medical Building,
Wednesday, Jan. 12, at 11 o'clock.
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memorial
Hall.Michigan Printmakers Society, Jan.
3-23; Contemporary Folk Art of Japan,
Jan. 8-25. Hours: 9:00-5:00 p.m. week-
days, 2:00-5:00 p.m. on Sundays. The
. h 4oisiwfn

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