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January 05, 1955 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-05

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

EDwr..R, nAV'_ TAVTTARY rt_ tAK!E

Civil Union
Hails Court
Declaration
By DONNA HANSON
American Civil Liberties Union
has pointed to the Supreme Court
decision ending segregation in pub-
lic education as the major civil
liberties gain in the past year.
In the Union's 34th annual re-
port, "America's Need: A New
Birth of Freedom," other import-
ant civil liberties successes were
listed as the Senate's Watkin's
Committee condemnation of Sen-
#tor Joseph R. McCarthy (R-Wis.)
for abuse of witnesses, and the
counterattack by educational
groups "against the assorted or-
thodoxies which seek to dictate
educational content, method and
personnel."
Anxious About Discrimination
These three developments, ac-
cording to the Union's report, pro-
duced more advances for civil lib-
erties in the last six months than
in any corresponding period for
several years.
The defenders of civil liberties,
however, are anxious about such
,trouble spots" as "organized dis-
crimination" attacks.
Although the Supreme Court's
anti-segregation decision will re-
quire much more thought, work,
and forbearance for some years
to come, it is an historic decision
meant to put an end to anti-Ne-
gro discrimination.
Nails Watkins' Report
Fairness in legislative inquiry
has taken a new lease on life, ac-
cording to the ACLU, since the
Senate's condemnation of Sen.
McCarthy. Its report hailed the
Watkins' report as the basis for
this condemnation.
The Union's report stressed that
the shock and outrage expressed,
by Americans should not trap
them into urging police and courts
toward wholesale arrests and in-
discriminate toughness, or intot
sanctioning the censorship of
books and motion pictures and
television programs.
Wilder Gains'
New Position
After serving for one year as1
president-elect, Prof. Raymond L.1
Wilder of the mathematics de-
partment assumed office as presi-
dent of the American Mathemati-
cal Society on Jan. 1.
Prof. Wilder, who will hold his
post for two years, now heads the
5,000 member society which is de-1
voted to research organization.
AMS members include almost all
research mathematicians in the
United States and also members
from Canada and other foreign
countries.
The society will hold its sum-
mer meeting in Ann Arbor for the
first time since 1935.r
I L
7!bEAR JERRY
KATILL E I
ISH A L W A L K SLIT V 1 I S N
U mA m 9'
w.rrTECHICLOR
ARAM IRUSE

Also . . . Walt Disney's
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Matinees 50c Nights 80c
For Schedule Information
DIAL NO 2-2513
Saturday -
Humphrey Avo
BOGART GARDNER
in
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I_

Old Coat Ha

RELIC FROM DAYS GONE B
has been hanging on a coat ra
Bldg. for at least three years.I
as any, since a nameplate insid
be Alan Reid, who graduated fr
1952. Reid was chief photograp
year and is now employed by th
forestry student may some day
is now slightly out of shape foll
ONE-SEMESTER JOB:
Students Prac
In Ann Arbor
By MARGE PIERCY
"It comes as a shock to student-
teachers that high school students
don't do things as well as college
students," Prof. W. Robert Dixon
of the education school, co-ordi-
nator of student teaching in sec-
ondary education, commented.
About 50 students practice teach
in University High School, Prof.
Dixon explained, for one semester
of their senior year, most work-
ing 16 hours a week for eight hours
credit. Others work in public
schools in Ann Arbor or surround-
ing school districts.
In 'U' High School, four student
teachers are assigned to a regular
teacher, two in the morning and
two in the afternoon. In partici-
pating schools, only one or two
are assigned each critic teacher.
Stage fright is avoided, Prof.
Dixon elaborated, by having the
student teacher begin by helping
individual youngsters who have
problems in the subject, then work
with small groups before under-
taking a whole class.
An evaluation system has been
set up with the supervising teach-
Music Conference
To Begin Friday
The tenth annual Midwestern
Conference on School Vocal and
Instrumental Music will start at
9:15 a.m. Friday in the Union
Ballroom.
Virgil Thomson, music critic of
the New York Herald Tribune,
will speak on "Memoirs of a Mu-
sic Critic." The Conference will
last through Saturday.
r r

ings Limply Army Legal
To Be Taught
Army legal training for ROTC
students enrolled in the Law
School and local attorneys was
approved yesterday by the Judge
Advocate Division of the Army in
Washington, D.C.
The school will prepare those
seeking to enter the Army's ju-
dicial branch, the Judge Advocate
General Corps, by holding week-
ly classes in military law. The first
20 members of the school will
meet tomorrow at 7:30 p.m. at the
National Guard Armory Fourth
and Ann Sts.
Jack Dulgeroff, Ann Arbor at-
torney and major in the Army Re-
* serve, will conduct the school. The
school is designed primarily for
lawyers belonging to an active re-
serve unit and law students in the
ROTC, but provision will be made
to enroll any practicing attorney.
The school will be divided into
Y-This blue wool sport jacket two sections. Both advanced and
ack in the Student Publications elementary courses will be con-
Three years is as good a guess ducted, including military justice,
e the collar shows the owner to military and civilian affairs and
rom the University in February, new court-martial procedures. The
her for The Daily in his senior section starting tomorrow night
her or Te Dily n hs seior will meet weekly until June.
he United States Army. The ex- Pesonsenrolle nec
return to claim his coat, which Persons enrolled in the course
will be required to spend two
lowing its long hanging. weeks , during the summer at
Camp Sheridan, Chicago.
tice Teaching DAILY C
High Schools
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
ers. In addition, the pupils them- official publication of the University
selves may be asked to fill out of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
questionaires rating student teach- bility. Publication in it is construe-
ers. It's been found as a rule that tive notice to all members of the
they're popular with pupils, Prof. University. Notices should be sent in
Dixon recalled. TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
Anne Millegan, '55, commented, the day preceding publication (be-
"The first thing that struck me fore 10 a.m. on saturday). Notice of
about student teaching was get- lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published of tener
ting down to their level. Words we than twice.
take for granted like 'concise' or R.
'obscure' they've never e v e n WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 5, 1955
heard."I Vol. LXV, No. 73
Miss Milligan teaches begin-
ning Spanish and social English,
which she described as a remedial February Teacher's Certificate Candi-
course primarily for students not dates: The Teacher's Oath will be ad-
giingdto college, Appraising the ministered to all February candidates
going for the teacher's certificates during the
student - teaching program, she week of Jan. 3, in Room 1437 U.E.S. The
said, "It's great for what it is- office is open from 8 to 12 and 1:30 to
a transition between being taught 5. The Teacher's Oath is a requirement
and teaching." for the teacher's certificate.
Arlene Gottesman, '55, remark- Registration material for students in
ed that the practice was import- the College of Literature, Science and
the Arts is available at Window 1 of the
ant for changing perspective. "You Records Office, 1513 Administration
see the classroom differently, even Bldg. To obtain material student re-
from a physical point of view, with ceipt or I.D. Card must be presented.
30 faces staring at you." Veterans in training under Public
Outlines of the course look com- Law 550 must sign VA Form 7-1996,
pletely different, Miss Gottesman MONTHLY CERTIFICATION, for Dec.
continued. "I've found I'm apt to before 5:00 p.m. Thurs., Jan. 6, in the
be much more critical of my own Officeof Veterans' Affairs, 555 Admin-
teachers now." Miss Gottesman istration Building.
has been working with history Members of the Faculty are invited
classes. to apply for a visiting teachers grant
"Putting yourself into the stu- offered through the Carnegie Corpora-
dent's shoes," is the biggest prob- tion. The undergraduate colleges at
Chicago, Columbia, Harvard and Yale
lem, according to Hugh Grey, are collaborating in a Joint Program
Grad, "that and learning how to for Internships in General Education.
present the materiail most effec- Colleges and Universities may nomi-
tively." Grey is a student teacher nate one of their own staff members to
in civics and social problems spend a year at the institution of his
choice as a visiting teacher in the gen-

OFFICIAL STATEMENT:
Science Group Urges
Security Plan Revision

CLASSIFIEDS

Security programs by the gov-
ernment where scientists are con-
cerned should be reworked says
the American Association for the
Advancement of Science.
This was the first official state-
ment made by the scientific or-
ganization. More than 256 socie-
ties are affiliated with the AAAS,
a membership of more than two
million.
Emphasis on positive achieve-
ment for national security rath-
er than the negative bottling up
of secrets was called for by the
Board of Directors of the AAAS.
Maximize Gains
The strength of the United
States, the Board said in the Dec.
10 issue of Science, can be "en-
hanced by changing our basic con-
cept of internal security from one
that attempts almost exclusively
to minimize our losses to one that
places greatly increased emphasis
on maximizing our gains."
Speaking out mainly against in-
terference with the natural flow of
scientific investigation by govern-
ment screenings, the AAAS noted
that scientific knowledge cannot
be kept secret by the "security
practices that serve to safeguard
military information."
Is Accumulative
As the Science News Letter put

it "progress in science is a culm-
ulative process in which each sci-
entist builds upon what is already
known, adding to it through re-
search and intellectual effort."
The article continued that the
guarding of the nation from in-
ternal subversion by screening
government employees and persons
having access to classified infor-
mation is "necessary, but poses a
serious dilemma."
The Dilemma
This dilemma reads: "The more
completely we succeed in reduc-
ing the danger that information
now in our possession may leak
to a potential enemy, the more risk
we run of interfering with scien-
tific progress and of reducing the
technologic superiority and the
moral and physical strength upon
which victory in the ultimate test
would depend."
Secrecy, the degree of secrecy;
and the conditions under which
secrecy is desriable and the risk of
losing secrecy, the AAAS said,
should be considered in terms of
"their contribution to the devel-
opment and maintenance of the
military, industrial and moral
strength which are our ultimate
protection against effective at-
tack."

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M, daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST: Braided gold watch chain, South
University near Forest or Church. Re-
ward, NO 2-1365. )57A
LOST: Social Science 154 Notebook.
Urgently needed. Ken Stoumen, NO
2-3191. )58A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1950 FORD, two door, one owner, low
mileage, good tires, radio, heater. Only
$475. NO 2-7884. )166B
1938 PLYMOUTH, runs good, $65.
1948 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, $245.
Fitzgerald-Jordan. Inc.
607 Detroit Phone NO 8-8144
)183B
NEVER USED-$140 1954 Zenith Trans-
oceanic portable for $89. NO 3-2569.
)156B
LEICA IIIC, F 3.5 Elmar, new case.
Best offer, NO 3-5862.
'47 TWO DOOR FORD. Many new
parts, Going to Army, must sell.
Phone NO 2-8797. 1315 Cambridge..
)197B
1947 MERCURY Club Coupe, excellent
motor $140. NO 3-5339. )1998
'39 PONTIAC COUPE. Excellent con-
dition. Tim Leedy, NO 2-5514. )200B
1951 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater-Green and Real Nice. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )205B
1950 CHEVROLET Bel-Aire Sport Coupe,
radio,heater, powerrglide-SHARP.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )204B
1940 PONTIAC, two door, new rubber
and clean. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)203B
1952 CHEVROLET four door, radio,
heater, low mileage. The big lot
across from downtown carport. Huron
Motor Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO
2-4588. )202B
1953 CHEVROLET Station Wagon, ra-
dio, heater, one owner, very clean.
The big lot across from downtown
carport. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )201B
FOR RENT
FURNISHED - Two bedroom campus
apartment. Available Jan. 15 for 3-4
adults. Private bath. $140. NO 3-8454.
)17C

ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. )23D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male student,
double rooms and suite, cooking
privileges. Half a block from Cam-
pus, 417 E. Liberty.. 127D
NICE, QUIET FURNISHED ROOM on
Washtenaw Road, bus service, 3 miles
from Ann Arbor, garage available.
Phone Ypsi 307, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. daly.
)29D
ROOM FOR RENT in private home In
residential section. Preferably to
young faculty man or graduate stu-
dent. Note: no chain smoker neeld
apply. No drinking allowed. $50 per
month. Call NO 2-0826. )28D
HELP WANTED
WANTED-Graduate home economist.
Preferably with foods major for home
service work. Experience. preferred.
Apply to Mrs. Steward. Michigan Con-
solidated Gas Co. )27H
BUSINESS SERVICES
R.A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)101
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
sox washed also. )81
TYPING -- Thesis, Term Papers, etc.
Reasonable rates. Prompt Service. 8305
S. Main, NO 8-7590. )181
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
Hallicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1% blocke east of East Eng. )473
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787

Fri., Jan. 7, 1955-Wyandotte, Michi-
gan-Teacher Needs: Early Elementary.
Tues., Jan. 11, 1955-Cleveland, Ohio--
Teacher Needs: Kdg., Elementary, Spe-
cial & Secondary Education (particular-
ly, Mathematics, Science, Industrial
Arts and Business Education.
Thurs., Jan. 13, 1955 & Fri., Jan. 14,
1955-San Diego, California -- Teacher
Needs: Mathematics, Science, Home
Economics, Industrial Arts, Girl's Phys-
ical Education, English, Social Studies,
Early and Later Elementary.
Wed., Jan. 26, 1955-La Mesa, Califor-
nia-Teacher Needs: Elementary & Sec-
ondary-all fields.
For appointments, contact, Bureau of
Appointments, 3528 Administration
Bldg., NO 3-1511 ext. 489.
PERSONNEL REQUESTS:
Plymouth Cordage Co., Plymouth,
Mass.-Organic Chemist for Research
Lab., man with degree in Organic
Chemistry, industrial research experi-
ence helpful but not necessary.
The United States Graphite Co.,
Saginaw, Mich.-Sales Representative,
would prefer a man who is an Engi-
neering graduate, but will take other
college graduate to train.
St. Louis Dept. of Public Health
(Civil Service), Clayton, Mo.-Clinical
Psychologist. Exam is open to both
men and women with a combination
of training & experience equivalent to
completion of two years of university
graduate work in clinical psychology,
including an acceptable internship.
Mademoiselle Magazine, New York,
N.Y.-announces an art contest open
to any woman under twenty-six years
old, enrolled in a college or art school.
The deadline is March 1, 1955.
Farnsworth Electronics Co., Fort
Wayne, Ind.-Engineering positions for
E.E., M.E., and Aero E.-advanced de-
grees desirable but B.S. acceptable, ex-
perience required. Men wanted to work
in research and development of air-
borne microwave equipment and of
other electronics equipment.
U.S. Air Force, St. Louis, Mo.- Car-
tographer, Cartographic Aid, Carto-
graphic Draftsman, Air Navigation
Technician. BA in Cartography, Engi-
neering, Mathematics, Physics, Geog-
raphy (preferred), Geology, Geodesy,
Astronomy, Photogrammetry, or four
years experience.
U.S. Civil Service, positions in Wash-
ington, D.C. area for Physicist, Elec-
tronic Scientist, Mathematician, Elec-
tronic Engr., Physical Chemist, Bio-
chemist, Physical Science Aid, and
Engrg. Aid. B.S. and/or graduate de-
gree in appropriate fields. Positions
also open in the field of Radioisotopes
for Biologist, Physicist, and Biochem-
ist with degrees in Physical or Biologi-
cal Science and varying amounts of ex-
perience.
U.S. Civil Service, Treasury Dept.,
Chicago, Ill. area-Tax Collector for
district offices in Chicago, Springfield,
Detroit, Milwaukee. Three years Bus-
Ad, Accounting or Legal experience, or
CPA certificate, or membership in Bar
of state, territory or District of Colum-
bia. BA degree in Accounting, Business
Econ., Finance, or Business Law. First
exam date Jan. 29, 1955.
Mich. State Civil Service Commission
announces examinations for-Veterin-
arian 111A and Veterinarian 111 for 1)
in assigned district responsible for well-
.If

being of live-stock; 2) serve as stock-
yard inspector. Must possess Michigan
veterinary license, plus a degree in vet-
erinary medicine. Closing date Jan.
19, 1955.
Highway Designing Engineering 11--
B.S.E., plus one year experience in sur-
vey, design, construction or research or
one year experience as Engineer Trainee
I. Application closing date is Ja'n. 19,
1955. Written exam given Feb. 26, 1955.
Hearings Transcribing Operator A,
to transcribe verbatim hearings or con-
ferences. Graduation from high school
plus one year of full-time experience
in transcription machine work. Closing
date Jan, 19, 1955. Written exam Feb.
26, 1955.
Forest Fire Lookout B, Park Ranger
C, Park Ranger B, men only. Forest
Fire Lookout B and Park Ranger C po-
sitions are filled on seasonal basis only.
Completion of the eighth grade and/or
high school, plus some experience for
Park Ranger B. Closing date Feb. 23,
1955. Written exam Feb. 12, 1955 and
March 12, 1955.
Boys Supervisor A and Housemother
Cl, must be man and wife. Applica-
tions will be accepted only from mar-
ried couples, both must pass the exam.
Graduation from High School. Closing
date Jan. 19, 1955. Exam given Feb. 26,
1955.
California State Personnel Board,
Sacramento, Calif.-Junior Civil En-
gineer for work with Division of High-
ways. B.S. in Civil Engineering. Closing
date Jan. 28, 1955.
For further information on any of
the above contact the Bureau of Ap-
pointments, room 3528 Admin. Bldg.,
ext. 371.
PERSONNEL INTERVIEWS:
Representatives from the following
will interview at the Bureau of Ap-
pointments. For interview appoint-
ments contact the Bureau at ext. 371,
room 3528 Ad. Bldg.
Thurs., Jan. 6, 1955--
Mich. Bell Telephone Co.-Women in
all fields for Management Training
Program. Feb. grads.
Wayne County Bureau of Social Aid
-will interview men and women who
are interested in doing social work any-
(Continued on Page 4)

for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2783 )20

a

: Y'

s-

THE DRAMATIC ARTS CENTER
A PROFESSIONAL ARENA THEATRE
Presents
THE FINAL FOUR PERFORMANCES OF
"SHE STOOPS TO CONQUER"
BY OLIVER GOLDSMITH
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY EVENINGS at 8:15
SUNDAY MATINEE 2:30 P.M.
ADMISSION 1.65
For Reservations, Call NO 2-5915 MASONIC TEMPLE
Box Office Open 10 A.M. to 8 P.M. 327 So. Fourth Ave.

classes.
Grey called student teaching ex-
cellent preparation. "If a person
doesn't like it in this somewhat
protected situation, he won't like
it when he gets out. You couldn't
just go out cold and start teach-
ing."
Discussing critic teachers, Grey
said it is not a matter of the crit-
ic teacher forcing his patterns on
the student teacher. "In fact," he
went on, "one big reason regular
faculty members accept student
teachers is because of the new
ideas they pick up."

eral education program. Assistant pro-
fessors and associate professors are
urged to apply. A leave of absence will
be granted for one year and the visit-
ing teacher's salary will be paid by the
host institution from funds provided by
the Carnegie Corporation. Remunera-
tion will be based on the individual's
regular salary with appropriate allow-
ances for transportation, increased liv-
ing costs, etc. Further information and
application blanks may be obtained in
the Graduate School Office.
The following student sponsored so-
cial events are approved for the com-
ing week-end. The calendar is closed to
student sponsored activities for the
current semester beginning Jan. 10.
Jan. 8-
Acacia
Alpha Epsilon Phi
Delta Tau Delta
Kappa Sigma
Phi Alpha Delta
Phi Delta Phi
Sigma Nu
Theta Delta Chi
TEACHER PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS:
-Thurs., Jan. 6, 1955-Lansing, Michi-
gan-Teacher Needs: Elementary &
Secondary-all fields.

m

r,

BUY AS
YOU RENT!
ANN ARBOR
OFFICE MACHINES
211 East Liberty
Phone NO 8-8727.

-whatever
your major,
you can o on
to an
with Micnigan Bell

Pao-

I

4--

You'll be able to use your college
education to full advantage in a
telephone career. Michigan Bell's
women's management training program
prepares you for an important
executive position with the telephone company.
You'll be earning a good salary from
the start and promotions to more responsible
and higher paid jobs are frequent.
There is every opportunity for bright
young -women to advance rapidly to top positions.
Find out more about your opportunities

I

ii

11

mm

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