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January 04, 1955 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1955-01-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'7

GE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 4, 1$55

0

JAN. 31 DEADLINE:

/1

President's Edict To End
Korean Veteran Benefits

By DICK SNYDER'
Veterans' benefits under bills
passed during the Korean War will
be terminated Jan. 31 by executive
order of President Eisenhower.
Most seriously affected by the
order will be servicemen with less
than 90 days of active duty prior
to Feb. 1 and men entering the
service after that date.
They will lose such benefits as
education and training aid, mus-
tering-out payments, unemploy-
ment compensation, loan guaran-
ties and hospitalization based on
wvar veteran, status.
Lessens Benefits
The presidential directive also
lessens benefits received by serv-
icemen recruited since Jan. 31,
1953. GI programs concerned with
men having less than two years
active service will benefit the in-
dividual according to the length of
time of his enrollment in the
armed forces. ..
For instance, a man will still be
able to receive one and a half days
of college schooling, not exceeding
a period of three years, for every
day of active duty he has per-
formed through Jan. 31.
The recent directive further
calls for complete termination of
education and training benefits on
Jan. 31, 1963. Loan guaranty pro-
grams are scheduled to end on
Jan. 31, 1965.s
1400 Korean Veterans
According to the University Vet-
eran Service Bureau, approxi-
mately 1400 Korean veterans are
in attendance on campus, while
about 100 are enrolled in exten-
sion courses.
Concert Cancelled
Stanley Quartet's sixth and fi-
nal concert in the Beethoven
Cycle scheduled for Sunday has
been cancelled because Prof. Ro-
bert Courte of the music school,
violist, has been ill with pneumoi-
ia since Dec. 16.
The concert will not be played
at a later date, as Prof. Oliver
Edel of the music school, cellist,
will be on sabbatical leave.

On campus, reaction to the ex-
ecutive order was mixed. Many
students who had planned to take
advantage of the education and
training benefits under the outgo-
ing law were disappointed in the
President's action.
A spokesman from one of the.
ROTC units on campus stated that
although the directive would have
some detrimental effect on en-
listees counting on the free school-
ing available to them at present,
it also would make possible tax
reductions.
Order Expected
Marjorie Uren, supervisor of the
Office of Veterans Affairs in the
Administration Building, said that
the Office had been expecting the
presidential order for some time.
She stated that benefits to vet-
erans of World War II were ended
by a directive of former President
Truman.
Mrs. Uren also said enlistments
dropped seriously after the latter
directive, necessitating Congres-
sional extension of the GI Bill for
12 months.
Spokesmen for the Eisenhower
administration have emphasized
the fact that the executive order
will not take away substantial
peacetime benefits now available
through the Veterans Administra-
tion, the Department of Defense
and other government agencies.
Speech Group
Appoints Two
Prof. H. Harlan Bloomer, direc-
tor of the University Speech Clin-
ic, and Prof. Gordon E. Peterson
of the speech department have as-
sumed positions in the American
Speech and Hearing Association.
Prof. Bloomer took office Sat-
urday as president of the group,
while Prof. Peterson was appoint-
ed editor of the Journal of Speech
and Hearing Disorders by the exe-
cutive council of the association.

Big College
Enrollment
Predicted
Michigan colleges will enroll
200,000 students by 1970-double
the present enrollment-Univer-
sity President Harlan H. Hatcher
predicted during a recent radio
broadcast over station WUOM-FM.
The problem of increased en-
rollments is due to the "baby
boom" of World War II, the Presi-
dent said.
Requirements High
"Students of 1970 now are in our
elementary schools," he pointed
out. "In a few more years they
will be enrolling in our colleges.
Entrance requirements are already
as high as I should like to see them
go.
"I believe the solution lies in
recognizing the need for increased
facilities and meeting that need,"
President Hatcher said. "We must
make sure that these students will
have a chance to get as far as
their, abilities will take them."
President Hatcher said there is
no feature to determine the maxi-
mum size of the University. "No
one knows where the limit is," he
said.
"It varies in the 15 schools and
colleges that make up the Univer-
sity. The limit is rigid in medicine
and flexible in the arts and edu-
cation. When good teaching can
no longer be provided, the limit
will have been reached."
Three Factors
President Hatcher based his
statement on increased enroll-
ments on three factors:
1) American population is on
the increase. By 1970 it will be up
57 per cent over the present popu-
lation.
2) A greater percentage of the
total population is going to col-
lege. In 15 or 17 years the ratio
may be as high as 25 college stu-
dents per 100 persons, while it is
now about 15 per 100.
3) More students who come to
college are remaining two or three
years beyond the normal four-
year course for advanced degrees.
Former Russian
Officer To Speak
On Native Country
Former Russian army officer
and president of the Young Men's
Christian Association for Russian
youth in America, Nicholas T.
Goncharoff will lecture on condi-
tions in Russia at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day in Kellogg Auditorium.
Sponsored by Lane Hall, the
program will include a talk by
Prof. Frank R. Barnett of Wabash
College, Indiana.'
Prof. Barnett will describe the
organization's activities of inte-
grating Russian escapees into Eu-
ropean society and of providing fi-
nancial and psychological support
to the 240,000 refugees in West
German concentration camps.
Bennett Gets Post
Dean Wills I. Bennett of the
College of Architecture and De-
sign has been elected a fellow of
the American Institute of Manage-
ment, the organization has an-
nounced.

IUARY I

Petitions
Tomorrow is the deadline for
second semester engineering
freshmen to submit petitions
for a position-on the Sopho-
more Engineering Class Board.
Petitions are available in the
Engine Arch lobby and out-
side Rm. 348, West Engineering
Building.
Groups Okay
China Debate
Debate in colleges and .univer-
sities on whether the United
States should extendhdiplomatic
recognition to Communist China
was approved by the Speech As-
sociation of America and other
speech organizations during, a re-
cent meeting in Chicago.
Other groups attending the
meeting were the National Society
for the Study of Communication,
National University Extension As-
sociation and American Forensic
Association.
According tp one of the persons
at the meeting, Prof. N. Edd Mill-
er, Jr., of the speech department,
the question of recognition of Red
China was determined by an an-
nual nation-wide poll of, debate
coaches as the most popular cur-
rent debate subject in colleges
Two thousand teachers of
speech and allied subjects in col-
leges and high schools attended
the meeting.

THE CIT
By JIM DYGERT
As the deadline for entering the
16 contests in Ann Arbor's April
4 elections arrived yesterday, only
two battles had developed for the
Feb. 21 primaries.
Both contests are in the Re-
publican ranks. Bruce J. Maslin
has announced his candidacy for
the Second Ward City Council seat
now held by Ald. Ronald E. Hin-
terman, who is seeking re-election.
In the other primary contest,
Prof. A. D. Moore of the .engi-
neering school and Ralph C. Keyes
are seeking the Republican nomi-
nation for council president.
Democrats Complete Slate
The Democrats yesterday com-
pleted their slate for the coming
primaries. Prof. George Herman
of the speech department announ-
ced his candidacy for the First
Ward council post, while Alex Can-
ja and Jack C. McCollum entered
the race for seven seats on the
County Board of Supervisors.
During the Christmas vacation,
Dr. Albert J. Logan, Ann Arbor
dentist, announced his candidacy
for mayor on the Democratic
t i c It e t. Republican incumbent
Mayor William E. Brown, Jr., had
previously announced he would
run for reelect.ion.
Prof. John Weimer of the Eng-
lish department last week entered

the Democratic primary for the
Sixth Ward council post.
Earlier, John W. Conlin became
the third man to announce his
candidacy for council president. A
Democrat, Conlin is unopposed in
the primary.
Republican Ruth, M. Dana and
Democrat James W. McFall have
entered their names for the Board
of Supervisors primary. Mrs. Dana,
wife of Dean Samuel T. Dana of
the natural resources school, has
been a member of the board from
the Sixth Ward since 1948..McFall
is seeking the Second Ward post.
Voters have until 8 p.m., Jan. 24,
to register for the primary elec-
tions. Voters who were registered
for the November, 1952 election
and who have not balloted since
then must register.
Charter Meeting
One of the two scheduled pub-
lic hearings on the proposed re-
vision of the city charter has been
cancelled, leaving a single public
meeting to be held at 7:30 p.m.
Thursday in the City Hall council
chambers.
The change was designed to
speed up completion of the final
draft of the document so that it
can be included on the April 4
ballotbaccording to Charter Study
Commission Chairman Lawrence
H. Ouimet. He said there will be
no announced changes in the pro-
posal until after the meeting.

Y BEAT

#:

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
ROBERT KINGSTON (left) as Hastings and Ralph Drischell as
Mr. Hardcastle offer a toast in Oliver Goldsmith's "She Stoops to
Conquer," current production at the Dramatic Arts Center. At-
tendance at the play has been increasing and was very good on
New Year's Eve, although student attendance has been poor,
DAC officials said yesterday.

Nr

r-.r..... .. . ~r.
C C,
a
ar 1
"
__.._.._

LOOK
HERE!
THE NEW YEAR BABY
BROUGHT US AN IDEA
FOR BETTER SERVICE
TO YOU

Group Accepts
Gifts, Grants
(Continued from'Page 1)
The Scottish Rite Committee on
Research in Dementia Praecox,
through the National Association
for Mental Health, Inc., of New
York, has given $4,000 to cover the
Childhood Schizophrenia Research
Project, which is under the di-
rection of Dr. Ralpha D. Rabin-
ovitch.
Peter Arnell, '41, gave $3,858.19
in honor of his father, Dominic
Antonelli. The Money is to be use-
ed for purchase of equipment for
the University Broadcasting Serv-
ice.
From Oreon E. Scott, '94L, of
St. Louis, Mo., the Regents ac-
cepted an offer to guarantee the
permanent continuation of the
Oreon E. Scott Awards and the
Oreon E. Scott Regents-Alumni
Honor Awards. The University will
receive $3,000 a year to meet the
cost of the dictionaries that rep-
resent the awards.
Included in the total of gifts and
grants accepted was $94,361.56 giv-
en during the past six months to
27 differenut funds already es-
tablished. Largest amount was
$72,373.76 given by miscellaneous
donor to the Michigan Alumni
Fund.
Commission's Resolution
Other gifts accepted by the Re-
gents included manuscripts and
books valued at $5,250 for the Wil-
liam L. Clement Library and 19
etchings and lithographs valued
at $3,575 given to the Museum
of Art by Edwin M. Otterbourg, of
New York City.
The Soo Locks Centennial Cel-
ebration Commission expressed its
thanks to the University for help
being given it in the observance of
the 1955 centennial of the opening
of the locks.
George A. Osborne, chairman
of the commission, presented the
Regents with the resolution adopt-
ed by the commission.
In other business, the Regents
appointed Stan Levy, '55, and Ha-
zel Frank, '56, as student represen-
tatives on the Board of Governors
of Residence Halls. Their terms
will expire June 30.
Twenty-two University faculty
members were granted leaves by
the Regents, most of them for re-
search studies.
Music Officers
Prof. Louise Cuyler of the
School of Music was recently
elected secretary of the American
Musilogical Society for the next
two years.
Prof. Hans David of the music
school was also elected to serve
one year on the executive board
as member-at-large.
SClean
* New
e Modern
bboi'1" (otel
8170 Jackson Rd. Ph. HA 6-8134
3-A Approval

as.i

'54

will save yooeu
CC.0 SUPER-RIGHT SMALL, LEAN
pareRibs ... LB. 39c

Union Cards
Life membership cards in the
Union are available to all stu-
dents who have paid full tui-
tion for the equivalent of eight
semesters.

FLORIDA DUNCAN 45-54 SIZE
Grapef ru it

3 for

29c

Super-Right Center Cut
PORK CHOPS ...
Super-Right Guaranteed Fresh
GROUND BEEF..
Cut from Boston Butts
PORK STEAKS".
All Good Brand
SLICED BACON.

lb. 77c
lb. 39c
lb. 49c
lb. 49e

CAMPUS AREA DELIVERY
ON THE HOUR -5 P.M. THRU 1 A.M.
from the
ie/MtrUna RESTAURANT
Near Packard on S. State ... NO 2-2028
OPEN ALL NIGHT
Small delivery fee on orders less than $5.00...
Minimum order of $2.50

U.S. No. . 1 1 5 lb. bag
MAINE P 67c
Florida, Yellow Hybrid
FRESH CORN .5 ears 39c
Tender Young Shoots
BROCCOLI ...bunch 29c

1.
i

Super-Right, Skinless
FRANKFURTERS lb. 43c

Outdoor Grown, Red Ripe
FRESH TOMATOES

14-oz. pkg.
. 19c

Always a Favorite!
HALIBUT STEAKS
Highliner: Cod, Haddock or Ocean Perch
FISH FILLETS..

lb.
45c

10-oz. pkg.
.33c

Libby's Fresh Frozen
ORANGE JUICE .760z*95c

Cap'n John's 10-oz. pkg.
FANTAIL SHRIMP .. 55c

Stokely's Meat or Tuna
FROZEN PIES

23c each
.4 for 89c

4-Fishermen Brand
FISH STICKS .

10-oz. pkg.
. . . . . 45c

I

i

THREE TASTY VARIETIES
Ann Page Beans
2 SANS25C
Sultana Brand qt. jar
SALAD DRESSING . . 35c,
A&P Whole Kernel
GOLDEN CORN . 4;;45c
Jane Parker 1-lb. box
POTATO CHIPS ... 49c

DELICIOUS TART-SWEET
A&P Apple Sauce
4 16-Oz.C
CANS '1
Florida Thrift-Priced
ORANGE JUICE 2 cans 49c

f

*,.
f

The most important
regular stocks. All

sale of
of our

the year. All items from
traditional high quality.,

BERNUARDUS
CALCANIUS
VIOLIN

Save upto
Coats - Suits - Dresses - Skirts - Jackets - Sweaters
Blouses - Handbags - Gloves - Costume Jewelry

14.95

This man, who worked in Genoa
during the period 1710-1750,
has always been regarded as a
first-class maker by experts all
over the world. His models are
that of Joseph Quarneri del
Gesu, and the fact is that there
are several Calcanius violins
that are owned as suppnoselyv

Sure Good Brand
MARGARINE...2

S-lb.
ctns.

41c

COATS

originally priced

DRESSES originally

Just Bake and Eat 3 pkgs. of 10
BORDEN'S BISCUITS 29c

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