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December 16, 1954 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-16

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I

THE M1.t1.liHl MAIN RAIL V

T HUR$DAY, DECEMBER 16, 1954

EK FOUR

C~E OUR III ftICIIGAN ~it

......

NEW YALE 'CELL'
A Club for 'Conservatives':
Island in a Sea of Pink?

TT SEEMS that in today's society the only way
youth can rebel against present trends is
by adopting a "conservative" attitude.
A recent editorial in The Chicago Tribune
quotes Felix Morley, former president of Haver-
ford college, as saying "Students are naturally
revolutionary. Innovation, experimentation,
iconoclasm-it is right and proper that all
young men should lean toward these question-
ing attitudes. In later years one comes to ac-
cept the dictates of authority. But on the canie
pus, surely, they may and should be question-
ed."
Morely was defending a Conservative society
organized at Yale Law School. His theory is
that nowadays, with the most popular political
trends tending toward the radical, the only
feasible way by which rebellion can be dem-
onstrated is by turning to conservatism.
SINCE THE "New Deal," governmental pol-
icy has gotten more and more away from
the old school of thought which shied clear of
any kind of liberalism. Now, with Communism
so close to us and socialism a controversial is-
sue rather than the "hot potato" of yesterday,
the Yale students apparently are taking the
only possible way of questioning and refuting
current practice.
It is now the fad on many campuses to fight
avidly for some kind of reform. The Yale stu-
dents have denied the necessity of extremist
methods in good government. .By doing this
they are actually exercising their traditional
right to rebel against present conditions. They
are taking the stand that rebellion lies in a
"middle road," protesting against the regimen-
tation, investigation and the prevailing feeli-g'
that a man must be charged with patriotic
fire and wonderful new plans to be an effective
politician.
THEIR SOCIETY is expressing their rebellion.
But this rebellion is a sensible one; it is
one based on practicality rather than idealism.
The Yale students have chosen the most in-
telligent way of exercising their prerogative.
They are advocating a workable, unified gov-
ernment and they are doing this through tlWe
unfortunately almost-forgotten medium of con-
servatism.
-Lou Sauer

THE ULTRA-CONSERVATIVE Chicago Tri-
bune has taken note, in an editorial, of a
Conservative Society formed at Yale Law
School. "The Yale society is exercising the tra-
ditional prerogative of youth to rebel," says the
Tribune, rationalizing their statement by claim-
ing, "Socialism, misnamed 'liberalism', the
New Deal and all other manifestations of the
left wing spirit are in the ascendant."
Of course, to the Tribune, the censure of
Wisconsin's Junior Senator, the defeat of Mi-
chigan's Kit Clardy and SAC approval of the
Common Sense Party must all seem to point
towards rising "manifestations of the left wing
spirit."
The "America-for-Americans" Chicago daily
further states, quoting former President of
Haverford College, Felix Morley, "Lectures and
libraries are alike slanted toward the left and
the campus traditionalist is almost as lonely
as was the Marxist in my own undergraduate
days." Although the editorial doesn't mention
it, we can imagine the writer's dismay and
contempt at the formation of the "Robin Hood
Clubs" last Spring. Remember "Robin Hood's
Merry Men?" They were formed in protest
against right wing attempts to ban left-wing
literature from libraries.
ALTHOUGH WE'D like to agree with the Tri-
bune that liberalism is in the ascendant,
that once again after a brief flurry of hysteria
we can speak out without the DAR, VFW, Mc-
Carthy and the Tribune investigating us, we
are not so optimistic.
For instance, we find it hard to concur with
their belief, "At most American colleges doc-
trines misleadingly called 'liberal' are in the
saddle." Perhaps the "liberals" referred to were
the regents of Georgia University who last
year suspended the student newspaper because
it printed an editorial supporting anti-discrim-
ination polces. Or perhaps they were the re-
gents of any state supported Unversity, in-
fluences largely by conservative business in-
terests and state legislatures.
The basic problem, perhaps, is one that has
plagued the Chicago Tribune for quite some
time-they have little conception of what the
terms "liberal" and "conservative" really mean.
To the Tribune, "liberalism" is "left-wing spir-
it" while "conservatism" is "Americanism."
This, it strikes us, is false.
Justifying the Yale society, Mr. Morley ob-
served, "Students are naturally revolutionary."
The Tribune, no doubt thinking of the sup-
posed acceptance of socialism, New Dealism,
and misnamed "liberalism," adds, "To be in
rebellion against orthodoxy, one must turn to
conservatism."
IT IS TIME the common myth that students
are rebellious and revolutionary was exploded
--polls have shown students generally tend to
follow their parent's political views and we
would hazard a guess that political feelings
on this campus are decidedly conservative.
We wonder how far the Tribune would go in
upholding youth's prerogative to rebel if the
rebellion came from the left rather than the
right. What, for instance, would their reaction
be to Labor Youth-League?
--Lee Marks

Free Speech
Not a Red
Invention

Key Nations
Should Get
Most Aid
By WALTER LIPPMANN
IN WORKING out an economic
policy for the under-developed
countries, which is what the Ad-
ministration is now doing, the
least dfficult of the questions is
whether the United States can
afford it. If the United States
could afford to spend $80,000,000,-
000 in the year 1945 to fight a war,
it can afford two or three billion
dollars a year to help keep the
peace.
The real bottleneck is not what
the United States and the other
capital exporting countries can af-
ford. It is what each of the m'ny
under-developed countries can ef-
fectively use. For it would be easy
enough, of course, to squander
unlimited sums of money. But it is
quite a different thing to find
ways of investing and of lending
money in ways which produce so-
cially desirable benefits.
There are, in fact, countries
which are under-developed and
poor, wanting the sheerest neces-
sities of life, and yet so ineffec-
tively and corruptly governed that
a large part of the money given to
them never reaches the people for
whom it is intended.
IN FORMING our new policy it
will be useful, I believe, to
adopt as a principal criterion the
capacity of each under-developed
country to use efficiently inves-
ment and aid. Under this principle
we would give the highest prior-
ity to, we would lend and invest
the most money in, those countries
which can use money the most
effectively.
We should keep separate in our
minds the contributions we make
for humanitarian reasons and
those which we make for political
and strategic reasons.
The more sharply the two op-
erations are distinguished, the,
better. For the client states, which
have to be subsidized, are in fact
so weakly governed that they can-
not be aided except under some-
thing very like a protectorate. But
all suspicion of a protectorate
must be removed if the new pol-
icy is to work well among the in-
dependent nations.
T HERE WILL be suspicion that
the new policy is not new at
all, that it is only a new version
of the policy of mutual security
and the arming, the fortifying,
and the committing to the West-
ern coalition of the weaker nations.
The best way to deflate that sus-
picion is to found the new policy
on the principle not of helping
where the need is greatest and the
weakness the most obvious, but of
lending and investing where the
prospects are the best.
The prospects are best in the
countries which have reasonably
strong and effective governments,
and also kind of modern industrial
base and some technological ex-
perience. The practical common
sense of approaching the problem
in this way will do much to re-
move the suspicion, which our ene-
mies will certainly do their best
to spread, that we are shopping
around the world for client states.
By giving priority to the stronger,
-and therefore to the more in-
dependent governments, we can do
much to show that our real object
is what we say it is-namely, to
promote as rapidly as possible un-
der conditions of freedom the pro-
gressive development of the under-
developed nations.

THE PRINCIPLE I have been
arguing for may be describe4
as the key-country approach.
This is in the realm of high
policy a sound conception: not to
think of ourselves as engaged pri-
marily in building, plugging, and
holding a damn of small states
around the periphery of the Com-
munist world-but to think of our-
selves as one among several cen-
ters of free power and influence
in all the vast regions of Europe,
Asia, Africa, and South America,
that are not in the Communist
world.
Our difficulties in southern In-
do-China illustrate these points.
In order to pump substantial eco-
nomic help into Viet Nam, there
is need of a Vietnamese govern-
ment that can administer the aid.
But there is not now such a gov-
ernment in Saigon, and only if
and when one is put together, can
we hope to take serious construc-
tive measures for the improvement
of the conditions of life.
Moreover, though we are quite
able to give substantial material
help, it is not easy for the United
States, dealing directly or in con-
cert with France, to respect the
sovereign independence of Viet
Nam and at the same time to do
anything efective about bringing
into existence a government that
can govern.
We are in a difficult and deli-
cate dilemma. We must realize
fht - ~a " o if m i tP.C tothe

DREW PEARSON:.

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- a lw3&e-n cM-

FIRST SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
University of Michigan
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
January 17 to January 27, 1955
For courses having both lectures and recitations, the time of
Blass is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitations only, the time of class is the time of
the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined at
special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict
is resolved by the class which conflicts with .the regular schedule.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.
REGULAR SCHEDULE

Ike May
Seize Red
vessels

MORE AND MORE everyday, it seems, peo-
ple tend to associate pleas for free speech
with Communism. If one mentions that a par-
ticular group is defending civil liberties or
opposing loyalty oaths, he usually hears, "Oh,
one of those 'pinko' organizations."
It isn't really so surprising that such false
associations are made. Lazy thinking does it
all the time. But it is distressing that free
speech is being smeared with red paint.
There is absolutely nothing in communistic
theory, practice of psuedo-communism, or Com-
munist Party ideology that even vaguely touch-
es on the principle of free speech. Freedom of
speech is an Anglo-Saxon heritage. To asso-
ciate free speech with Communism is to credit
Communism with a principle to which it
unequivocably opposed.
THE ONLY thing for which we should credit
Communism is its ability to confuse the
American people into their pres'ent attitude of
misunderstanding those who argue for free
speech.
Confusion is not a good thing, especially if
we do not realize we are confused. The Com-
munists have brought it about by shouting for
free speech in tune with those who really be-
lieve in it. And America, as the Communists
no doubt planned, chose to believe that those
who were sincere were copying the Communists
when it was actually the other way around.
This realization reduces the problem to one
of differentiating between those who want
free speech so as to confuse the issue on Com-
munism and those who want free speech for its
own sake. These latter realize, too, that Com-
munism can destroy itself with its own illo-
gical words and utopian promises,
A PREREQUISITE to making any headway
with the problem is to call a halt to the
present confused thinking and hasty asso-
ciations. Next resolve never to associate one
who argues for free speech with Communism.
If he intends to practice the free speech he
asks, we'll soon know whether or not he is a
Communist.
If he is, let him keep on talking. Though you
disagree with him profoundly, defend to the
death his right to make a fool of himself. If
it looks like people are believing his foolishness,
stand up, take advantage of the freedom of
speech you have helped preserve, and point out
why he is foolish,
Supposing he doesn't take advantage of the
free speech he asks. Still let him alone. Pre-
vent further confusion: don't call him a Com-
munist, or even a 'pinko.'

MUSIC

At Hill Auditorium ..
University Choir, Maynard Klein, conductor.
Soloists: Phyllis McFarland, soprano; Arlene
Sollenberger, contralto; Harold Haugh, tenor;
Philip Duey, bass. Nelson Hauenstein, flute.
Accompanist: William Doppmann. Brass quar-
tet: Donald McComas, Wesley Measel, Jo-
seph Moore, James Harrington.
THE UNIVERSITY CHOIR'S annurl Christ-
mas concert consisted of sacred music in
diversified styles, but with a prevailing serious
tone. Whatever flaws might have been present
in the performance, the general impression was
that the choir members loved singing and were
enthusiastic about the music they were pre-
senting. The Victoria motet which opened the
program was sung effectively, with the tricky
tempo change near the end well executed. The
Gabrieli Omnes Gentes was also given a good
performance, although it was not easy to un-
tangle the contrapuntal structure of the work.j
The Bach motet, Sing Ye to the Lord, is a short
but powerful composition in a bright major to-
nality, and with some of the most florid writing
I have ever heard in a choral work. Here lay
the difficulty in the performance. The passage-
work in fast note values tended to become so
much undulating sound, without the definition
that it ideally should have had. However, much
of the work came off very well, and it was not
really a weak point in the concert.
The Hymn to the Virgin by Benjamin Brit-
ten is a simple and rather touching piece, with
skillful choral writing. This was the second time
I had heard Vaughan Williams' Magnificat, and
I must say that it improves on rehearing. It's
a rather curious and quite subjective setting of
the famous text. But Vaughan Williams' never-
failing sincerity and workmanship carry it
through. It was a fine performance, with excel-
lent co-operation from Miss Sollenberger and
Messrs. Hauenstein and Doppmann. The Bruck-
ner Te Deum brought from the choir its most
ardent and full-voiced singing of the program,
and the solo quartet contributed effectively to

W ASHINGTON-President Eis-
enhower has made one im-
portant concession to military ad-
visers who have been pushing him
to take strong steps in China.
These military men are chiefly
Adm. Arthur Radford, Chairman
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and
Gen. James Van Fleet, the Korea
commander whose letter on troop-
training contributed to Ike's elec-
tion.
What the President has agreed
to is the use of the U.S. Navy to
seize Red Chinese merchant ves-
sels-if the United Nations fails
in its attempt to free the 11 Am-
erican airmen and two American
civilians.
Eisenhower's concession on this
point came only after a long ser-
ies of debates inside the National
Security Council and the White
House. During most of these de-
bates the President leaned over
backward against his military ad-
visers.
The man who chiefly backed him
up was General Matt Ridgway,
Army Chief of Staff, who has so
emphatically disagreed with Eis-
enhower on reducing the strength
of the armed forces that he will
probably be retired on his birth-
day in March. But, on the ques-
tion of getting bogged down in a
possible war in China, the two
spoke the same language.
Admiral Radford, however, is
one of the most charming and per-
suasive military men in the Pen-
tagon. Very much in the doghouse
with the Truman administration
because of his open battle against
the Air Force, Radford sweet-
talked himself into Ike's good
graces during one short hour when
Ike's plane refueled at Iwo Jima
during the December, 1952, trip
to Korea.
Ike then took Radford on the
rest of the trip and he's been with
him ever since.
Easy To Seize Reds
RADFORD therefore, was able
to talk Eisenhower into a pro-
mise that the U.S. Navy would be
used to seize Commnist China
shipping-if the UN negotiations
break down. He did this in part
by showing how easy it has been
for Chiang Kai-shek's navy, rein-
forced by U.S. observation planes
and using former U.S. warships, to
capture Red Chinese shipping
Red shipping has to pass
through the relatively narrow wa-
ters between the Chinese main-
land and Chiang's Formosa, where
it is easy for Chiang to lay in wait
and pick off ships almost at will,
Thus, without a blockade, Red
China would not be able to com-
municate between the vitally im-
portant seaports of the south and
those of the north,
Washington Pipeline
THE STATE Department has
drawn up a secret list of 526
missing Americans-472 service-
men, 54 civilians-who have dis-
appeared behind the bamboo cur-
tain. The State Department is
morally certain many are alive in
Communist prisons, has asked
Central Intelligence to locate them
. . . If our agents in China can
find proof these men are alive,
Uncle Sam will make a vigorous
protest in the United Nations, then
follow up with military pressure if
necessary . . . . The French are
missing 20,000 troops that the
Reds were supposed to repatriate
under the armistice agreement in
Indo-China . . .. The recent East
German elections revealed that
the number of voters has dropped
by 238,181 in the last four years.
Most are refugees who fled to the
west . . . . The Administration is
rmietly trving to arrange for Chief

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
(Child Welfare), Senior Social Case
Worker (Public Assistance), Chief Di-
etitian, Junior Sanitary Engineer, and
Junior Public Health Engineer. Appli-
cations must be in by Jan. 21.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, Room 3528
Administration Bldg., Ext. 371.
Academic Notices
Zoology Seminar. Dr. James D. Ebert,
associate professor of zoology, Indiana
University, will speak on "Some As-
pects of Protein Biosynthesis in Devel-
opment," Thurs., Dec. 16, at 4:15 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheater.
401 interdisciplinary Seminar on the
Application of Mathematics to Social
Science will meet Thurs., Dec. 16, Room
3401 Mason Hall, 4:00-5:30 p.m. C. H.
Coombs and S. Komorita will speak on
"Measuring the Utility of Money."
Seminar in Applied Mathematics will
meet Thurs., Dec. 16, at 4:00 p.m. in
Room 247 West Engineering. T. B, Curtz
of WRRC will speak on, "Inequalities
Involving Cylindrical Functions."
Seminar in Mathematical Statistics.
Thurs., Dec. 16, at 4:00 p.m., in Room
3201. Angell Hall. Miss Irene Hess will
discuss Chapter VI in Cochrane's Sam-
pling Techniques.
Fluid 'Mechanics Colloquium, spon-
sored by Dept. of Aeronautical Engi-
neering. Thurs., Dec. 16, 2:00 p.m.,
Roorm 1504 East Engineering Bldg. Ed-
ward Spiegel of the Astronomy Depart-
ment will discuss "Theory of Turbu-
lence" recently developed by Chandra-
sekhar.
Logic seminar will not meet this week
Biological Chemistry Seminar: Car-
nosine and Anserine, under the direc-
tion of Dr. A. A. Christman; Room 319
West Medical Building, Fri., Dec. 17
at 10:15 a.m. Please note change in
time.
Doctoral Examination for Seymour
Lieberman, Psychology; thesis: "The
Relationship between Attitudes and
Roles: A Natural Field Experiment,"
Fri., Dec. 17, 6625 Haven Hall, at 1:15
p..Chairman, Daniel Katz.
Doctoral Examination for George A.
Bell, Political Science; thesis: "The
Michigan Municipal League:An Analy-
sis of Policies and Services," Fri., Dec.
17, East Council Room, Rackham Bldg.,
at 2:30 p.m. Chairman, A. W Bromage
Doctoral Examination for Albertina
Adeheit Abrams Education: thesis:
"The Policy of the National Education
Association toward Federal Aid to Edu-
cation (1857-1953)," Fri., Dec. 17, 4024
University High School, at 1:00 p.m.
Chairman, C. Eggersten.
Doctoral Examination for Clayton
James Pilcher, Business Administration;
thesis: "Convertible Bonds and Pre-
ferred Stocks: an Analysis and Evalua-
tion of their Role as Capital Raising
Instruments," Mon.. Dec. 20, 816 School
of Business Administration, at 9:00
a m, Chairman, M. H. Waterman.
Doctoral Examination for Andrew
Turner, Chemical Engineering; thesis:
"The Polymerization of Normal Octene-
1 with Anhydrous Aluminum Chloride,"
Wed., Dec. 22, 3201 East Engineering
Building, at 9:00 a.m. Chairman, D. W.
McCready.
Doctoral Examination for Elizabeth
Jane Lipord, Education; th esais:
Teachers' Beliefs about Health Ap-
praisal," Mon., Jan. -, East Council
Room, Rackham Bldg., at 3:15 p.m.
Chairman, M. E. Rugen.
Doctoral Examination for Ben Clifford
Markland, Speech; thesis: "Evasiveness
in Political Discussion Broadcasts dur-
ing the 1952 Election Campaign," Tues.,
Jan. 4, 4202 Angell Hall, at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, E. E. Willis,
Concerts
Student Recital, Mary Patricia Hanes,
cellist and violist, will be heard at 8:30
p.m. Thurs., Dec. 16, in Auditorium A,
Angell Hall, in a program 'presented in
partial fulfillment of the requirements
for the Bachelor of Music degree. Miss
Hames studies cello with Oliver Edel

and viola with Robert Courte. Her re-
cital will include works by Boccherini,.
Handel, and Brahms.
Ev~ents Today
Christian Science Organization Testi-
monial Meeting, 7:30 p.m. Thurs., Fire-
side Room, Lane Hall.

MONDAY
TUESDAY

SPECIAL PERIODS
Literature, Science and the Arts

English 1, 2
Zoology 1
Botany 1, 2, 122
Economics 51,5
101, 153
French 1, 2, 11,
Russian 1
Political Scienc
Sociology 1, 54,E
Spanish 1, 2, 31
German 1, 2, 11
Chemistry 1, 3,
Psychology 31

Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
2 Wednesday, January 19
52, 53, 54, Thursday, January 20
12, 31, 32 Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
e 1 Saturday, January 22
60 Saturday, January 22
, 32 Monday, January 24
, 31 Monday> January 24
5E, 20, 23 Tuesday, January 25
Wednesday, January 26
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Monday, January 17
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
Wednesday, January 19
2, 53, 54, Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Friday, January 21
Saturday, January 22
Monday, January 24
Monday, January 24
5E, 20, 23 Tuesday. January 25

(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at
(at

8
9
10
11
12
1
2
3
8
9
10
11
1
2
3

Wednesday, January 19
Saturday, January 22
Tuesday, January 25
Monday, January 17
Tuesday, January 18
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
Thursday, January 20
Friday, January 21
Monday, January 24
Wednesday, January 26
Tuesday, January 18
Thursday, January 27
p Thursday, January -20
Monday, January 17

English 11
Drawing 3
M.I.E. 136
C.E. 23, 151
Drawing 1
M.I.E. 135
C.M. 107
Economics5
101, 153
Drawing 2
E.E. 5
P.E. 31, 32
E.M. 1, 2
C.M. 113, 1
Chemistry 1

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

51, 5
15
1, 3,

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS
Literature, Science and the Arts
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the con-
sent of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts be-
tween assigned examination periods must be reported for ad-
justment. See bulletin board outside Room 301 West Engineer-
ing Building before January 7 for instruction.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board in the School of Music.
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
SCHOOL OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Courses not covered by this schedule, as well as any neces-
sary changes, will be indicated on the School bulletin board,

f

A

Department are invited to participate
in the discussion.
La P'tite Causette will meet Thurs.,
Dec. 16 from 3:30-5:00 p.m. in the left
room of the Michigan Union cafeteria.
Venez tous et parlez francais.
Episcopal Student Foundation. Stu-
denit Breal fast at Canterbury House,
Thurs., Dec. 16, after the 7:00 a.m. Holy
Communion. Student-conducted Even-
song at 5:15 p.m., Thurs., Dec. 16, in
the Chapel of St.Michael and All An-
gels. Caroling Party at 7:30 p.m. Thurs.,
Dec. 16. Will leave from Canterbury
House.
Christmas Vespers will be held in the
sanctuary of the Presbyterian church
at 5:10 p.m.
Michigan Dames and their families
will be special guests at the Interna-
tional Center Tea Thurs., Dec. 16 from
4:00-6:00 p.m. in the Rackham Bldg.
Sailing Club. Meeting Thurs., 7:30
p.m. 311 W. Engineering.

Sixty-Fifth Year
Edited and managed by students of
thez University of Michigan under the
authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
Editorial Staff
Eugene Hartwig .... ..Managing Editor
Dorothy Myers............City Editor
Jon Sobeloff ........Editorial Director
Dave Livingston .........Sports Editor

0
Lois
Phil
Bill

Business Staff
Pollak.........Business Manager
Brunskill, Assoc. Business Manager
Wise .........Advertising Manager

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