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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 16, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1601954

Year of '54
Reviewed
(Continued from Page 1)
ideas." Later, she claimed in an af-
fidavit, she went to the FBI on
the advice of Robert Klinger, As-
sistant Counselor of the Inter-
national Center, who denied urg-
ing her to do so.
On the same day the coed-FBI
story ran in The Daily, a bigger
headline announced the appoint-
ment of James A. Lewis, as the
new Vice-President in charge of
Student Affairs. Director of the
University's Bureau of School Ser-
vices at the time, Lewis was to
assume his new post July 1.
Clardy Committee Hearings
Less than two weeks later, the
Clardy committee made the Daily's
headlines again when it was learn-
ed that a faculty member from
the University had testified in
secret session in Detroit.
After a week of hearings in
Detroit, Clardy took his commit-
tee to Lansing where three, Uni-
versity faculty members appeared
before it. All three refused to tes-
tify about alleged Communist as-
sociations under either the fifth
or first amendment. They were
Prof. Clement L. Markert of the
zoology department, Prof. Mark
Nickerson of the pharmacology de-
partment and H. Chandler Davis
of the mathematics department.
Following their Lansing appear-
ance, President Hatcher suspend-
ed the three from their teach-
ing positions "without prejudice"
and set into motion the machinery
that had been set up to handle
such cases.
Amid much controversy, the
University's investigation of the
three cases got under way. During
the summer, PresidentrHatcher
recommended to the Board of Re-
gents that Prof. Nickerson and
Davis be dismissed and Prof. Mar-
kert be reinstated. The Regents
followed the recommendations.
SGC Developed
Back in May before the semes-
ter had ended, President Hatcher
had been presented with a pro-
posal for reorganization of stu-
dent government, the Student
Government Council. The plan
resulted from several months of
study by a Student Affairs Com-
mittee subcommittee chairmanned
by Prof. Lionel H. Laing of the
political science department.
Early in the summer, three
years of negotiations came to an
end in a joint announcement by
the Regents and the Michigan
Press Association that Regents
meetings would be open to mem-
bers of the accredited press be-
ginning in September.
Rooming House Fire
First big story of the new school
year came near the end of Oc-
tober when a rooming house at
508 Monroe went up in flames.
Two women perished in the fire
-Elizabeth R. Vandegrift, a grad-
uate student, and Mrs. Florence
E. Hendriksen, owner of the home.
Although the cause of the fire
was never determined, the disast-
er touched off a re-evaluation of
the city's building inspection set-
up. Thomas H. Ryan, city build-
ing inspector, said the dilapidated
100-year-old structure was typical
of about half of Ann Arbor's
roolring houses.
As student eyes were on Mich-
igan's surprising football team,
traditional rival Michigan State
provided the next big event of the
year. Twenty students from the
up-state school were apprehended
while smattering green and white
paint on the University campus.
Rounding out thTe list of ten was
the surprising record rolled up

by the Michigan football squad
that found itself going into its
final game-'Ohio State--with a
chance of returning to the Rose
Bowl once again.
Predicted to finish low in the
Big Ten standings before the sea-
son opened, Michigan went into
the OSU game with a Big Ten
record marred only by a close loss
to Indiana. But the Buckeyes came
out on top and won the California
trip, while the Wolverines counted
the juniors and sophomores among
themselves and said, "Wait 'til
next year."

Dean Moore
Set To Attend
Conference
By DAVID KAPLAN
Dean Earl V. Moore of the
School of Music and Prof. James
B. Wallace, music school secretary,
will represent the School at the
30th annual meeting of the Na-
tional Association of Schools of
Music.
Sessions will be held Dec. 29,
30 and 31 in Los Angeles.
One of the major items of dis-
cussion at these meetings will
be the problem of regional accre-
diting of transfer students in mu-
sic schools.
Aspects of Study
Other important aspects of mu-
sic study will be considered, in-
cluding the study programs which
should be devoted to teacher-
training, those devoted to profes-
sional training and those concern-
ed with general culture.
The NASM is comprised of more
than 200 leading schools of music,
universities and colleges through-
out the country.
In addition to being the official
representative of the School of
Music, Dean Moore is a past presi-
dent of NASM and for more than
a decade served as Chairman of
the Commission on Curricula.
NASM Beginnings
The NASM was founded in 1924
by a small group of leading schools
in an effort to solve many prob-
lems then facing educators.
Today, its position in the edu-
cational field is such that the
Commission on Accreditation has
designated the NASM as the As-
sociation responsible for approval
of music standards on a national
basis. The University's School of
Music was a charter member of
the Association in 1924.

ToELRUIFI l/ld

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M, daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Class Register on North Uni-
versity or East University. Call NO
8-7651 immediately. )55A
LOST: Braided gold watch chain, South
University near Forest or Church. Re-
ward. NO 2-1365. )57A
LOST: Social Science 154 Notebook.
Urgently needed. Ken Stoumen, NO
2-3191. )58A
LOST-Blue Ronson lighter with gold
fleurdelis. Initials N.E.B. Finder call
NO 3-1531, Ext. 105. )59A
DO YOU HAVE MY COAT? Man driv-
ing car with Wisconsin license who
picked up students thumbing to To-
ledo Nov. 19 would like to recover
Tan Tweed Kuppenheimer Coat taken
by mistake. Call NO 8-8887 or leave
coat at 1209 S. University. )60A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Box,1
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington.')26B
1950 FORD, two door, one owner, low
mileage, good tires, radio, heater. Only
$475. NO 2-7884. )166B
CHRISTMAS TREES-$1.00 up. Drive
in Pontiac Road at R.R. track, one
block west of Broadway signal light.
We don't want all the business, just
yours. )20L
1938 PLYMOUTH, runs good, $65.
1948 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, $245.
Fitzgerald-Jordan, Inc.
607 Detroit Phone NO 8-8144
)183B
1953 FORD V-8 VICTORIA HARDTOP
$1395
Two-tone flamingo and ivory
Matching vinyl upholstery
White-sidewall tires
Chromium wheel covers
Automatic transmission
Fresh-air heating system
Windshield washers
Push-button radio
A one-owner car. Will arrange terms.
For a demonstration drive, call
NO 3-3233. )187B
1938 CHEVROLET, beautiful shape,
private sale by elderly lady. NO 3-3267.
Call after 6 p.m. )185B
1948 DODGE, four door, radio, heater,
one owner. The big lot across from
downtown carport. Huron Motor
Sales, 222 W. Washington, NO 2-4588.
)194B
1950 PLYMOUTH, four door, radio
heater, snow tires, very clean. The
big lot across from downtown car-
port. Huron Motor Sales, 222 W.
Washington, NO 2-4588. )193B

FOR SALE
NEVER USED-$140 1954 Zenith Trans-
oceanic portable for $89. NO 3-2569.
)156B
MARTIN TROMBONE-First line in-
strument, excellent condition, $90.
Call NO 3-8661. )195B
LEICA IIIC, F 3.5 Elmar, new case.
Best offer, NO 3-5862.
TAPE RECORDER T.D.C. Columbia,
new $189.95; Webster-Chicago Wire
Recorder $69.95, no down payment.
Hudson Electronic, 200 N. 4th, NO
8-6822. Tape Recorder Sales and Ser-
vices. )196B
FOR RENT
FURNISHED - Two bedroom campus
apartment. Available Dec. 15 for 3-4
adults. Private bath. $140. NO 3-8454.
!)170
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, ,518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. )23D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male student,
double rooms and suite, cooking
privileges. Half a block from Cam-
pus, 417 E. Liberty. )27D
WANTED TO RENT
THREE WOMEN GRADUATES desire
private apartment for Feb. NO 3-5938.
)8K
TRANSPORTATION
RIDERS WANTED to Florida. Five cars
(Three Brand New) leaving Dec. 17
or 18-$20, helping drive appreciated.
NO 3-8177, after 6 p.m. )34G
DRIVER for private car to Florida,
gas, oil, and guaranteed plane fare
home provided. NO 2-6750, Mrs. Web-
er. )26H
WANTED-2 riders, trip to Florida, one
way or return, '54 convertible, leav-
ing on or about the 18th. Call NO
2-3589. )37G
WANTED-Riders to Florida, leaving
Saturday A.M. Contact Chuck Illi,
Ypsi 1648 W. )38G
PERSONAL
YES
we'll handle all your last second
gifts. Student Periodical, NO 2-3061,
days, eves. (pay after Christmas) )51F

HELP WANTED
DRAFTSMAN WANTED for consulting
engineering office. Part time or full
time. Familiarity with piping and
chemical machinery desirable but not
necessary. No Saturday work. Box 3.
)23H
DRIVERS WANTED-I need new Fords
delivered to West Palm Beach, Flor-
ida. Vacation in Florida on my at-
tractive offer. Call Bill, Petro for
details. Days Detroit, Vermont 6-9087,
nights Detroit Kenwood 3-8321. )25H
BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY-VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
)1OI
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
soxs washed also. )81
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND T.V.
"Student Service"
Hallicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1%. blocks east of East Eng. )47E
PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS - accurate,{
concise informational guide to the
western European medical schools-
Isting admission requirements, ap-
plication procedures, etc. Write
"Guide," Box No. 122, Williamstown,
N.J., $2.30 prepaid or COD plus post-
age. )161
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
so d2x8 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20

Y

1.

I

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

Buy and Use
Christmas Seals

'

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construe-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 71
Notices
Instructors' signatures for the month
of December may be obtained before
Dec. 17. DEAN'S MONTHLY CERTIFI-
CATION must be returned to Dean's
office no later than Jan. 3. VA Form 7-
1996a will be filled in and signed in the
Office of Veterans' Affairs during the
week of Jan. 3.
The General Library will observe the
following schedule during the holiday
period:
Open: Fri., Dec. 17, 8:00 a.m.-6:00 p~m.
Mon. - Thurs., Dec. 20-23, 8:00 a.m.-
6:00 p.m. Mon. - Thurs., Dec. 27-30,
8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m. Fri., Dec. 31, 8:00
a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Closed: Fri., Dec. 24. Sat., Dec. 18
(*Dec. 25, and Jan. 1). Sun., Dec. 19,
26. and Jan. 2.
*Christmas Day and New Year's Day.
The Divisional Libraries will be open
on shortened vacation schedules on the
days that the General Library is open.
The hours are 10:00-12:00 a.m. and 2:00-
4:00 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Sched-
ules will be posted on the.door of each
individual library and information as
to hours of opening may be obtained
by calling University Ext. 652.
PERSONNEL REQIESTS:
New York State Civil Service Depart-
ment announces exams to be held Feb.
19, for the positions of Senior Physi-
cian, Assistant Director of Psychologi-
cal Services, Psychological Assistant,
Senior Mechanical Stores Clerk, Senior
Clerk (Maintenance), Parole Officer,
Thruway Promotion Rep., Factory In-
spector, Game Protector, Assist. in Test
Development. These are open to legal
residents of New York State. The fol-
lowing positions are open to any quali-
fied citizens of the United States: Sen-
ior Clinical Psychologist, Clinical Psy-
chologist, Senior Social Case Worker
(Continued on Page 4)

a

rI

p

(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)
The Students' International Travel Association offers a
wide variety of tours bound for Europe, South America,
Hawaii, Mexico, Around the World, etc. With the stu-
dent especially in mind, SITA offers everything from
lowcost cycling trips to more comfortable rail and bus
tours. Out-of-the-way places are explored as well as
large cities. For detailed SITA booklets and complete
information, please call any evening or weekend: Homer
and Patricia Cooper, 1024 Hill; NO 3-1511, extension
544'

4

(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)

I

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ENDING FRIDAY
CecilR
MIGHTY
SPECTACLE
OF LOVE
AND VIOLENCE!
31,31'
A ig
f0)
e /
-EHioO

WEBERS SUPPER CLUB
will close Dec. 22
and will reopen
January 28,
p1

i

}

It's Light -
Smooth II
_' ' Really Mell

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1

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