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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 15, 1954 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15,195'4

THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1954

Prof. Edel Plans Country-Wide Tour

Education Films Offered
By Audio-Visual Center

'SIFIEDS

-U
PROF. OLIVER EDEL ... new1
"Ann Arbor is a complex, fruit-
ful place, full of varied activities
at a high cultural level," he said.
"But, the things of permanence
that I love here I sometimes want
to get away from."
"My background is one that is
familiar with movement," Prof.
Edel explained. "Although I lived
in New York, I concertized a great
deal and now miss the freedom and
delights of travel."
Born in Yonkers, N.Y., Prof.
Edel received his musical educa-
tion at New York's Manhattan
School of Music. He continued his
studies in Europe under Andre
Hekking and Diran Alexanian.
He made his c'oncert debut in
New York's Steinway Hall in 1925,
and three years later made his
chamber music debut in Town Hall
with the Manhattan Quartet. He
toured Europe and the United
States with the Quartet from 1928
to 1937.
He first came to the University
in 1943 as part of a trio group. Aft-

-Daily-Dick Gaskill
insight and greater perspective.
er a two-year position as a cham-
ber music and orchestral perform-
er on a New York radio station, he
again made concert appearances at
the University.
In 1946 he became professor of
violon cello here, after a teaching
career in New York, New Jersey,
Massachusetts and Utah.
Musically Active
While on campus, he has been ac-
tive in numercus musical groups,
notably the Stanley Quartet. He has'
been a member of the Quartet
since its inception in 1947 and has
remained with them ever since.
Quartet concerts for 1954-55 have
been scheduled for only the first
semester, although the usual pro-
gram of 25 concerts will be per-
formed this semester.
Prof. Edel has also been Board'
of Directors chairman of the Arts
Theatre, chairman of the music
school's scholarships and awards
program and president of the mich-
igan chapter of the American
String Teachers Association.

By ARLIS GARON
"We're having a movie in class
today!" generally comes as a wel-
come break from the usual lecture.
Any department of the University
as well as various campus groups,
Michigan schools, and state organ-
izations has access to 3,084 film
titles through the services of the
Audio-Visual Education Center.
Operating on the idea that "pic-
tures speak louder than words,"
the Center includes its functions in
three major areas: distribution of
audio-visual materials, production
and educational services.
Facilities Used
Students in foreign countries in-
cluding Canada, Guatemala, Pak-
istan, and the Philippines and
throughout the United States have
taken advantage of the more than
8,000 prints of motion pictures
available.
The Center has facilities for the
production of 16-millimeter silent
and sound pictures, filmstrips, re-
cordings, and exhibits.
Last year 500 speech students
making use of these facilities, had
the opportunity to see themselves
perform in sound motion pictures.
The project may be tried again
in the future.
Films in Productiton
According to Director Ford L.
Lemler, one of the major produc-
tions now under way is a color
film "Locks of Sault Ste. Marie"
to be used in connection with the
Soo centennial celebration.
A film on the care and treatment
of cleft-palate children has been
made in connection with the speech
clinic and a film strip on Parlia-
mentary Rules of Procedure is be-
ing produced in collaboration with
Prof. Frederick G. Stevenson of
the School of Education.
Thousands of words are made un-
necessary by the Center's chart
and graph service. An instructor
or an organization may have a va-
riety of communication devices
such as posters, charts, maps, car-
toons, diagrams, exhibits and other
visual symbols custom-made to suit
their educational purpose.
Literature drama, music and
guidance receive a new twist when
presented on TV and radio right
in the classroom by means of the
Center's new kinescopes and the
more than 300 tape recordirgs of
educational programs.
Information Center
Benefit from audio-visual serv-
ices presupposes a knowledge about
them. Thus the Center distributes
information about audio-visual ma-
terials and methods. Members of
its staff offer their services through
formal course work given in the
School of Education and off campus
through the Extension Service. Nu-
merous conferences, workshops,
and faculty meetings are also de-
voted to audio-visual methods.
Problems seldom remain un-
solved when taken to the field
service maintained by the Center

for consultation. The Center staff
will aid in the selection, purchase
and use of audio-visual equipment
and materials, and help edit and
construct films and film strips.
"Always a good show" and "serv-
ice when you want it" could be con-
sidered the mottos of the Center.
All materials are critically select-
ed to meet the needs of an impor-
tant educational purpose and are
screened and evaluated by staff
members or by teacher commit-
tees. Fast service is guaranteed
by the liberal purchase of dupli-
cate prints of films which are in
great demand.
The Center is rapidly expanding
and increasing its services to meet
the new emphasis being put on "en-
joyment in learning" through au-
dio-visual education.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the University
of Michigan for which the Michigan
Daily assumes no editorial responsi-
bility. Publication in it is construc-
tive notice to all members of the
University. Notices should be sent in
TYPEWRITTEN form to Room 3553
Administration Building before 2 p.m.
the day preceding publication (be-
fore 10 a.m. on Saturday). Notice of
lectures, concerts, and organization
meetings cannot be published oftener
than twice.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1954
Vol. LXV, No. 70
Notices
TIAA - College Retirement Equities
Fund.Participants in the Teachers In-
surance and Annuity Association re-
tirement program who wish to change
their contributions to the College Re-
tirement Equities Fund, or to apply for
or discontinue participation in the
Equities Fund, will be able to make
such changes before Dec. 15. Staff
members who have % or 3 of the con-
tributions to TIAA allocated to CREF
may wish to change to a 1'2 basis, or
go from the latter to a % or % basis.
Social Chairmen of house groups and
campus organizations are notified that
the calendar is closed to student spon-
sored activities for the seven days prior
to the beginning of a final examination
period. Final examinations for the pres-
ent semester begin Jan. 17. This means
that no approvals may be given for
events scheduled after Jan. 9. It is
suggested that social chairmen planning
to register events for the week-end of
Jan. 7, 8, 9 do so before leaving for
the Christmas holidays.
Holiday Regulations. While University
Offices and departments will be open
during the regularly scheduled hours
on the Fridays before Christmas and
New Years, staff members may choose
one of the 2 Fridays as an additional
holiday. It is expected that each office
and department will operate with a
skeleton force, and staff members who
are off on the Fri. before Christmas
will work on the Fri, before New Years
and vice versa.
(Continued on Page 4)

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone NO 23-24-1
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .66 1.47 2.15
3 .77 1.95 3.23
4 .99 2.46 4.31
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily.
1:00 A.M. Saturday
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Class Register on North Uni-
versity or East University. Call NO
8-7651 immediately.. )55A
LOST: Braided gold watch chain, South
University near Forest or Church. Re-
ward. NO 2-1365. )57A
LOST: Social Science 154 Notebook.
Urgently needed. Ken Stoumen, NO
2-3191. )58A
LOST-Blue Ronson lighter with gold
fleurdelis. Initials N.E.B. Finder call
NO 3-1531, Ext. 105. )59A
DO YOU HAVE MY COAT? Man driv-
ing car with Wisconsin license who
picked up students thumbing to To-
ledo Nov. 19 would like to recover
Tan Tweed Kuppenheimer Coat taken
by mistake. Call NO 8-8887 or leave
coat at 1209 S. University. )60A
FOR SALE
ARMY-NAVY type Oxfords-$6.88. Sox,
39c; shorts 69c; military supplies.
Sam's Store, 122 E. Washington. )26B
1950 FORD, two door, one owner, low
mileage, good tires, radio, heater. Only
$475. NO 2-7884. )166B
CHRISTMAS TREES-$1.00 up. Drive
in Pontiac Road at R.R. track, one
block west of Broadway signal light.
We don't want all the business, just
yours. )20L
1938 PLYMOUTH, runs good, $65.
1948 PLYMOUTH SEDAN, $245.
Fitzgerald-Jordan. Inc.
607 Detroit Phone NO 8-8144
)183B
1953 FORD V-8 VICTORIA HARDTOP
$1395
Two-tone flamingo and ivory
Matching vinyl upholstery
White-sidewall tires
Chromium wheel covers
Automatic transmission
Fresh-air heating system
Windshield washers
Push-buttonwradio
A one-owner car. Will arrange terms.
For a demonstration drive, call
NO 3-3233. )187B

FOR RENT
FURNISHED - Two bedroom campus'
apartment. Available Dec. 15 for 3-4
adults. Private bath. $140. NO 3-8454.
)17C
ROOMS FOR RENT
BY DAY-WEEK-MONTH - Campus
Tourist Home, 518 E. William (near
State). NO 3-8454. )23D
ROOMS FOR RENT-Male student,
double rooms and suite, cooking
privileges. Half a block from Cam-
pus, 417 E. Liberty. )27D
WANTED TO RENT
THREE WOMEN GRADUATES desire
private apartment for Feb. NO 3-5938.
)8K
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED: RIDERS to Maine, via Bos-
ton. Leave Dec. 17, return Jan. 2.
Call NO 8-8457. )16G
RIDERS WANTED to Florida. Five cars
(Three Brand New) leaving Dec. 17
or 18-$20, helping drive appreciated.
NO 3-8177, after 6 p.m. )34G
DRIVER for private car to Florida,
gas, oil, apd guaranteed plane fare
home provided. NO 2-6750, Mrs. Web-
er. )26H
WANTED--2 riders, trip to Florida, one
way or return, '54 convertible, leav-
ing on or about the 18th. Call NO
2-3589. )37G
PERSONAL
LOOKING FOR A JAGUAR in your
stocking? Why not treat him to a
subscription? He'll remember you all
year round. Phone Student Period-
ical, NO 2-3061, days, eves. Pay after
Christmas. )49F
HELP WANTED
DRAFTSMAN WANTED for consulting
engineering office. Part time or full
time. Familiarity with piping and
chemical machinery desirable but not
necessary. No Saturday work. Box 3.
)23H
HELP WANTED
DRIVERS WANTED-I need new Fords
delivered to West Palm Beach, Flor-
dia. Vacation in Florida on my at-
tractive offer. Call Bill Petro for
details. Days Detroit, Vermont 6-9087,
nights Detroit Kenwood 3-8321. )25H
Buy Christmas Seals

BUSINESS SERVICES
R. A. MADDY--VIOLIN MAKER. Fine
instruments, Accessories, Repairs. 310
S. State, upstairs. Phone NO 2-5962.
10I
WASHING-Finished work and hand
ironing. Rough dry and wet washing.
Also ironing separately. Free pick-up
and delivery. Phone NO 2-9020. Wool
soxs washed also. )8I
WEBCOR
3 Speaker Musicale
The first truly hi-fidelity table model
phonograph. Hear it and
compare it at
ANN ARBOR RADIO AND TV.
"Student Service"
Hallicrafters Radios and Television
1217 So. University Ph. NO 8-7942
1% blocks east of East Eng. )47E
PRE-MEDICAL STUDENTS - accurate,
concise informational guide to the
western European medical schools-
1sting admission requirements, ap-
plication procedures, etc. Write
"Guide," Box No. 122, Williamstown,
N.J., $2.30 prepaid or COD plus post-
age. )16I
REAL ESTATE
CALL WARD REALITY
NO 2-7787
for 2x3 bedroom homes-priced for
students. Evenings call:
Mr. Hadcock NO 2-5863
Mr. Rice 3YP 2740-M
Mr. Garner NO 3-2761
Mr. Martin NO 8-8608
Mr. Schoot NO 3-2763 )20
MISCELLANEOUS
YOU CAN still order mags by day or
night from Student Periodical, NO
2-3061. )50F
MARCH OlF DIME

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4

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JANUARY 3-31

(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)
The Students' International Travel Association offers a
wide variety of tours bound for Europe, South America,
Hawaii, Mexico, Around the World, etc. With the stu-
dent especially in mind, SITA offers everything from
lowcost cycling trips to more comfortable rail and bus
tours. Out-of-the-way places are explored as well as
large cities. For detailed SITA booklets and complete
information, please call any evening or weekend: Homer
and Patricia Cooper, 1024 Hill; NO 3-1511, extension
5'14.
(PAID ADVERTISEMENT)

A

Au I M,G.M'S v"'A HCE

NOW

Save on Holiday Travel
Vulcans Offer REDUCED RATES
to
Chicago, New York, Buffalo
And Other Points East

'THE
LAST TIME
I SAW
PARI39
starring
Elizabeth TAYLOR
Van JOHNSON
Walter PIDGEON
Donna REED
IACADEMY AWARD WINNER OF "FROM HERE TO ETERNITTY,
itn EVA GABOR - KURT KASZNAR

1.

j.

JOHN SUSAN
WAYNE -IHAYWYARD

I

MATS.
50c
EVES.
75c

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C

also WALT DISNEY'S "ONCE UPON A WINTERTIME"

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For Your Tickets
to the
CHICAGO PERFORMANCE
of
"HAIL TO VICTOR"
January 1
r-----__-- --------------
Leonard Nemerovski
175 West Jackson Blvd.
Chicago, Illinois
I enclose $ for the Chicago perform-
ance of "Hail to Victor!" at the Eighth Street
Theater for the number of tickets indicated below,

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