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December 14, 1954 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1954-12-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1954

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACF TRei,

'P a ferpw .A J .8. AAI'

i

COORDINATOR:
Baldwin Pioneers Religious Fellowship

By DONNA HANSON
Besides being in Rangoon, Burma
for 10 years as an educational mis-
sionary, De Witt C. Baldwin, Co-
ordinator of Religious Affairs, and
his wife have traveled twice around
the world, learning about other
cultures and peoples. _
Since leaving graduate school,
Baldwin has been working among
students. In 1948 he came to the
University because he felt that
since our campus has students from
every part of the world, he recog-
nized an opportunity for working
out methods of cooperation and hu-
man understanding.'
Village' Schools
Throughout his 10 years in south
Burma where he had charge of
village schools and churches of the
Methodist mission viork, he had
constant contacts with people of
Buddhist, Hindu, Moslem, Parsee,
and similar faiths found in South-
ern Asia.
In learning to get along with
these people of varied religions,
Baldwin began to understand how
to work with students of all faiths,
such as the opportunity that Lane
Hall offers here on campus.
"As- one of the foremost univer-
sities of our country in working out
a cooperative pattern of inter-reli-
giol - vork, Michigan offers an un-
exelled opportunity to meet and
talk with student groups of every
faith," Baldwin said.
During any week, Lane Hall pro-
vides facilities for committee meet-
ings of various religious groups on
campus. Students from every na-
tional and cultural group are wel-
come in any one of the 20 to 30
different types of programs and
projects through SRA and the Lane
Hall staff.
It was because of this opportu-
nity of pioneering in this field of

Ceremonies
Will Honor
Navy Group
Naval Security Group Division
9-12 will receive special honors at
7:45 p.m. today during a special
ceremony in North Hall.
University President Harlan H.
Hatcher and Captain Charles A.
Bond, commanding officer of the
University NROTC program will
be at the ceremony. Captain Bond
will. present a flag bearing the
Navy emblem, to Lt. William F.
Danielson, commanding officer of
the division,
The unit, a division of the Uni-
ted States Naval Reserve, was es-
tablished in Ann Arbor in 1950
and has been located at North Hall
since that time. Its purpose is the
special training of communications
technicians.
The award to be presented to-
day comes as a result of the
groups' outstanding rating achiev-
ed during an annual inspection
last year.

Roundtable
George Louis Rebattet, Secre-
tary General of the European
Movement, will address the Po-
litical Science Roundtable on
"France's Political Situation"
at 8 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheater.
Ford To Give
Fellowships
Abraham Weisblat, Ford Foun-
dation representative, will be on
campus today and tomorrow to
discuss the Foundation's foreign
study and research fellowship pro-
gram.
According to Prof. William D.
Schorger of the Near Eastern stu-
dies department, Weisblat will dis-
cuss area training fellowships for
individuals planning to specialize
in the Near East, Soviet and East
European areas and Africa.
Appointments may be arranged
through the secretary of the Near
Eastern Studies department in
Haven Hall.

(Continued from Page 1)
have testified that Boggie was not
the murderer if she had been so
asked. The prosecution handled her
carefully because a deputy prose-
cutor had tried to force her 12-
year-old son to identify Boggie,
which had much irritated her. And
the defense had evidently feared a
trap by the prosecution.
Skeletons Uncloseted
Here was the first intimation that
the Court of Last Resort was go-
ing to dig up some pretty nasty
stories, and open a lot of closets
full of skeletons. Argosy published
the available facts and America be-

gan to take notice. Authorities in
Washington took notice of the pub-
licity also.
Washington's attorney general's
office took up the investigation,
suspecting the evidence had not
warranted a conviction.
Gardner found the moan in whose
store Boggie had claimed to have
bought the overcoat. The man had
substantiated Boggie's story at the
trial, but the prosecution had
sought to discredit his testimony
on the grounds that he could not
identify the coat after two years.
Yet, prosecution witnesses were
identifying Boggie two years after
the murder.

The attorney - general's office
gave the Governor the facts and
stated it was ready to make a defi-
nite recommendation. The Gover-
nor wanted it in writing, and it
was agreed to do so.
Gardner considered the case
closed and returned to California.
But nothing happened.
It began to look as if someone
with considerable political influ-
ence in Washington did not want
Boggie pardoned.
But under constant pressure
from the Seattle Times and Argosy,
Washington's governor finally re-
leased Boggie.
Next: Public reaction

'Court' Secures Pardon for Boggie

-Daily-Lynn Wallas
DE WITT C. BALDWIN
.. .From Rangoon to Ann Arbor

'CARMINA BURANA':
U' Musical Society Schedules
Oriffwork in May Festival

inter-religious cooperation t h a t
Baldwin feels a challenge in his
work as Coordinator of Religious
Affairs.
When Baldwin and his wife start-
ed the International Institute of
Human Relations of the Lisle Fel-
lowship in 1936, there was no idea
that this "extra-curricular" inter-
est in intercultural affairs would
increase as it has through the
years.
Like the opportunity to work with
all faiths which Lane Hall provides
at the University, the Lisle Fellow-
ship similarly is an avenue for the

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appreciation of nationalities and
cultures the world over It also
presents an opportunity to experi-
ment through group-work in adult
education for world citizenship.
German Fellowship
As a part of that program, Bald-
win spent most of August in Ger-
many, meeting .German educators
and making groundwork for estab-
lishing the first Lisle Fellowship
unit in that country. This paist
summer there were five such pro-
grams of Lisle Fellowships, three
in the United States, one in Den-
mark, and one in Germany.
"Although recognizing that we
live in a world of great national
and international disorder, there
are enough indications that the
human family may be able to work
out its problems for us all to be op-
timistic," Baldwin stated. "The
fact that more people today have a
higher. standard of living than was
true when I left Burma in 1937.
The fact that atomic power has
been discovered and that even we
at the University recognize its
peaceful potential as one of its
great research projects.
These facts offer promise that
in learning to work together, we
may achieve enough human under-
standing to come out of this dark
period of human history."

Carl Orff's' "Carmina Burana,"
to be performed in the May Festi-
val "should be of particular in-
terest to modernists," Charles
Sink, Musical Society president
commented recently.
The choral work, written for so-
prano, baritone, tenor, chorus and
orchestra, is made up of five
movements. The Prologue be-
moans man's ever-changing fate
as the ruthless wheel of Fortuna,
the Goddess of Destiny, evolves.
The first part sings of the de-
lights of Spring, followed by pleas-
ures in a tavern, the gaming tab-
les and revelry. A series of love
poems follows in a movement
called "The Court of Love." The
Postlude repeats the plaintive be-
moaning of the ruthless wheel of
Fortuna.
Johnson Conducts
Since its performance a year
ago in Cincinnati, with Thor
Johnson conducting the Cincinna-
ti Symphony Orchestra, the work
has created a great deal of inter-
est among musicians.
"Carmina Burana" is conceived
for three varied kinds of perform-

ances. It can be sung in concert
form purely as abstract music. Or,
the words and music can be of
equal importance. Still another
version is to use a stage set, add-
ing a dancing group, and framing
the chorus and orchestra around
the dancers.
Stokowski Comments
Leopold Stokowski, the noted
conductor has said that "in the
world of music, Carl Orff is an
arresting phenomenon, a daring
modernist and master of all rich
musical resources from the past,"
Orff was born in Munchen, Ger-
many in 1895 where he received
his education and started compos-
ing. Later he conducted orchestras
at Munchen's Opera and Ballet
Houses. He also managed to find
time to cooperate in the formation
of a dancing school.
Other Compositions
He composed music played dur-
ing Berlin's 1936 Olympics and a
few years later wrote "Carmina
Burana." Other compositions writ-
ten between 1941-1954 include,
"Antigonae" based on Sophocles'
drama, a Bavarian Historic Drama
"Die Bernauerin" and the "Tri-
umph of Afrodite."
Season tickets for the May Fes-
tival, May 5, 6, 7 and 8 are now
on sale at the offices of the Uni-
versity Musical Society in Burton
Tower.Priced at $13, $10, $9 and
$8, tickets will be mailed March 1.

MEAL TICKETS
OR $25 CASH
BLIMPY RACE
December 14 - January 14... 8-10 P.M.
KIAZy JIM
112 East Huron

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For Unlimited Enjoyment

-I"

--

RCA VICTOR LYa RECORDS
Choose from this Star-Studded List of Suggestions
TOSCANINI, NBC SYMPHONY, ASSISTING GROUPS

Symphonies, 1 - 4 (Brahms)
Symphonies, 1 - 9 (Beethoven)
Requiem Mass (Verdi)
Symphony in C "Great" (Schubert)
Pictures at an Exhibition (Moussorgsky)
Otello-complete opera (Verdi)
La Mer (Debussy),

Fidelio-complete opera (Beethoven)
Missa Solemnis in D. Op. 123 (Beethoven)
Falstaff-complete opera (Verdi)
La Boheme-complete opera (Verdi)
Grand Canyon Suite (Grofe)
A Midsummer Night's Dream (Mendelssohn)
Symphony No. 5 in E minor (Dvorak);

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OTHER GREAT RCA VICTOR RECORDING ARTISTS
Gaite Parisienne (Offenbach)-Boston "Pops" Orchestra-A. Fiedler
Mass in G (Schubert); Short Selections (Brahms)-Shaw Collegiate Chorale-Robert Shaw
Ein Heldenleben; Also Sprach Zarathustra (R. Strauss)-Chicago Symphony-Fritz Reiner
Piano Concerto in D minor. Op. 16 (Brahms)-Artur Rubinstein, Chicago Symphony-Reiner
Aurora's Wedding Ballet Suite (Tchaikovsky)--Symphony Orchestra-Leopold Stokowski
Midsummer Night's Dream-complete (Shakespeare-Mendelssohn) -Old Vic Company
La Vida Breve-complete opera in Spanish (Falla) -De Los Angeles, Spanish Singers, Orchestra
L'Elisir d'Amore-complete opera (Don izetti) -Rome Opera Company-Santini
Damnation of Faust-complete (Berlioz)--Soloists, Chorus, Boston Symphony-Munch
Violin Concerto in D, Opus 35 (Tchaikovsky)-Milstein, Boston Symphony-Munch
Mr. Strauss Comes to Boston: Johann Strauss Favorites-Boston "Pops" Orchestra-Fiedler
-FOR THE "POPS" FAN-

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GLENN MILLER, Volume H (Limited Edition of over 60 Previously-Unreleased Recordings)

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The Boy Friend-Original Cast The Nearness of You (and others)--G. Miller
New Faces of 1952-E. Kitt and Original Cast Moods in Music-The Melachrino Strings
Carmen Jones-Movie Sound Track Outstanding Sauter-Finegan Arrangements

ARROW SHIRTS & TIES
UNDERWEAR s HANDKERCHIEFS 9 CASUAL WEAR

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